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What once we loved : a sisterhood of friendship and faith / Jane Kirkpatrick.

By: Kirkpatrick, Jane, 1946-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Kirkpatrick, Jane, Kinship and courage historical series: bk. 3.; Kirkpatrick, Jane, Kinship and courage historical series: 3.; Kirkpatrick, Jane, Kinship and courage historical series: 03.; Kinship and courage series : book 3: Publisher: Colorado Springs, Colo. : WaterBrook Press, 2001Edition: First edition.Description: 390 pages ; 21 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 1578562341 (pbk.).Subject(s): Female friendship -- Fiction | Women pioneers -- Fiction | Oregon -- FictionGenre/Form: Historical fiction. | Christian fiction.DDC classification: 813/.54
Contents:
Paperback -The most romantic of the three Kinship and Courage titles by award-winning author Jane Kirkpatrick, What Once We Loved beautifully illustrates the truth that neither the past nor the future need be feared as God heals old wounds and prepares a way for those who seek Him, call on His name, and surrender to His service. Readers will love this satisfying conclusion to the series, which follows Ruth Martin and the other turnaround women as they travel to arenas of untested promise, wherein they find hope that sustains them and relationships they'll cherish all their days.
List(s) this item appears in: Christian Fiction
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Fiction Hakeke Street Library
Fiction Collection
Fiction Collection KIR 1 Checked out 20/06/2019

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

A CIRCLE OF COURAGEOUS WOMEN DISCOVERS THE MEANING OF INDEPENDENCE, FORGIVENESS, AND LOVE Ruth Martin had a dream: to become an independent woman and build a life in southern Oregon for herself and her children. But when her friend Mazy's inaction results in a tragedy that shatters Ruth's dream, Ruth must start anew and try to heal her tender wounds.

Her friends are also moving on. Mazy wrestles with her understanding of what faith and family really mean; Tipton discovers that marriage requires more than she's ready to give; and Suzanne's challenge is to keep seeing with new eyes. Together, the turn around women travel to arenas of untested promise where they'll find a hope that sustains them and relationships they'll cherish all their days.
THE FINAL BOOK IN THE KINSHIP AND COURAGE SERIES

Paperback -The most romantic of the three Kinship and Courage titles by award-winning author Jane Kirkpatrick, What Once We Loved beautifully illustrates the truth that neither the past nor the future need be feared as God heals old wounds and prepares a way for those who seek Him, call on His name, and surrender to His service. Readers will love this satisfying conclusion to the series, which follows Ruth Martin and the other turnaround women as they travel to arenas of untested promise, wherein they find hope that sustains them and relationships they'll cherish all their days.

11 18 61 89 100 131 138 154 175

Sequel to: No eye can tell.

Excerpt provided by Syndetics

W h i p p e d - c ream clouds danced across a stage of blue before an audience of oak. Shadows softened the sun's glare on the water, allowing Ruth Ma rtin to peer beneath the river's surface. She'd seen that wily trout . Today she'd catch him without getting her feet wet . She retied the bent sewing needle at the end of the butcher's twine. California morning sun glinted on beads of water dotting the wet string like pearls. "Just one more little nibble and I'll have you," she said. Firm yet slender as a whip handle, Ruth sat astride her horse. Old miner's pants cove red her legs. Ju mpe r, her horse, wiggled his ears, lifted a back leg to scratch at a fly, splashed when he set his hoof down. "Don't lose concentration now, Jum per," she whispered, more to herself than the horse . Certain the needle was firmly attached, she flicked the willow fishing pole and watched as the breeze picked up the string, then set it and the makeshift hook adrift along the riffle. A reddish leaf broke loose from a willow, gentled in the stream following her line to the shaded pool. She eased the hook across the water. Waiting. Sh e'd have to head back soon. She still had pack boxes only half filled. Flannels needed steaming and hanging, and the wagon w a s n't nearly loaded. Then there was that Joe Pepin to contend with. T he wrangler'd said he'd take them north, but he'd been acting scarce of late. Still, Ruth Ma rtin could make it happen on time. She was sure. She just wanted to bring in this last big trout before she headed back. Astrid e Jumper, she could do it without getting wet. She smiled. Redwing blackbirds chirped in the tall grasses drooping with their weight. Sun warmed her face. Her eyes closed. She felt a tug. Sitting straight, she jerked the willow and set the hook. "Gotcha," she said. Skillfully she lifted the pole up and over the horse's head, changed hands, then back again as the trout twisted and tired in the water before her. He was a big one. When it felt right, she said, "Back, Jumper." She barely touched the reins and squeezed her knees, easing the big animal back toward the riverbank. "Just a little more," she said. Then with perfect timing, she slid the trout out of the water and onto the grassy bank. "We did it!" The horse lifted its head up and down as though to agree. With one leg raised over his mane, Ruth slid off, still holding the pole. She stunned the fish with the hard end of her whip that usually hung coiled at her hip, then slipped the fish into the canvas bag with the others. She had over a dozen. This one alone weighed as much as a pork roast. A good morning's catch. Plenty for them all at the big affair Elizabeth had planned. She tightened the strap of the bag, then draped it over the horse's neck. "You're a good fishing partner," she told Jumper, hugging him and inhaling his scent before gripping his mane in her hands and pulling herself up and astride. "The best I've ever had." She pressed her knees and set a fast pace back to Poverty Flat . Riding always invigorated, took away any agitation or worry. It was one of the few luxuries she permitted herself, a woman with responsibilities. Today, with so much yet undone, she needed that burst of power. A flock of geese lifted from the Sacramento as they raced by. She ducked beneath the oaks and through the pines embracing the meadow known as Poverty Flat and home--but not for much longer. She squinted. Matthew Schmidtke and the children were pushing something on a cart. Coopered barrels. They were all laughing. Surely they had n't already gotten all their chores completed. She did n't see any blankets on the line, Excerpted from What Once We Loved by Jane Kirkpatrick All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.