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Humans of New York / Brandon Stanton.

By: Stanton, Brandon [photographer.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York, N.Y. : St. Martin's Press, 2013Edition: First edition.Description: 1 volume (unpaged) : colour illustrations ; 24 cm.Content type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781250038821 (hardcover) :; 1250038820 (hardcover).Subject(s): Street photography -- New York (State) -- New York | City and town life -- New York (State) -- New York -- History -- 21st century -- Pictorial works | Photography, Artistic | New York (N.Y.) -- Pictorial worksDDC classification: 974.70022/2 Online resources: Cover image Summary: "In the summer of 2010, photographer Brandon Stanton set out on an ambitious project: to single-handedly create a photographic census of New York City. Armed with his camera, he began crisscrossing the city, covering thousands of miles on foot, all in his attempt to capture ordinary New Yorkers in the most extraordinary of moments"-- Provided by publisher.
List(s) this item appears in: 9. Your Best Reads of 2017
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Based on the blog with more than four million loyal fans, a beautiful, heartfelt, funny, and inspiring collection of photographs and stories capturing the spirit of a city


Now an instant #1 New York Times bestseller, Humans of New York began in the summer of 2010, when photographer Brandon Stanton set out to create a photographic census of New York City.  Armed with his camera, he began crisscrossing the city, covering thousands of miles on foot, all in an attempt to capture New Yorkers and their stories.  The result of these efforts was a vibrant blog he called "Humans of New York," in which his photos were featured alongside quotes and anecdotes. 

 

The blog has steadily grown, now boasting millions of devoted followers.  Humans of New York is the book inspired by the blog.  With four hundred color photos, including exclusive portraits and all-new stories, Humans of New York is a stunning collection of images that showcases the outsized personalities of New York.

 

Surprising and moving, printed in a beautiful full-color, hardbound edition, Humans of New York is a celebration of individuality and a tribute to the spirit of the city.
 

With 400 full-color photos and a distinctive vellum jacket

"In the summer of 2010, photographer Brandon Stanton set out on an ambitious project: to single-handedly create a photographic census of New York City. Armed with his camera, he began crisscrossing the city, covering thousands of miles on foot, all in his attempt to capture ordinary New Yorkers in the most extraordinary of moments"-- Provided by publisher.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Stanton, street photographer and creator of the blog humansofnewyork.com, again takes to the streets of Gotham in this -follow-up to his best-selling 2013 book of the same name. This time, the author allows each subject to be examined in a raw state, putting the focus on their inspiring quotes and commandeering the heart of the reader. In this way, Stanton more than succeeds in bringing street life to light, establishing a message that no matter what borough, social, or economic background, and despite age differences, we all have a story-and his subjects are ready to tell theirs. What started in 2010 as a zealous project for the former day trader has resulted in more than 400 pages of sheer inspiration. This is a well-crafted work; each image and story is strategically placed. VERDICT For inspiration seekers and anyone with a pulse. [See Prepub Alert, 5/6/15.]-Tamikka Malloy, Camden Cty. Coll. Lib., Blackwood, NJ © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly Review

The latest from Stanton (Humans of New York), creator of the "Humans of New York" blog, which currently has over 14 million followers, is another rich collection of photographs of people from the streets of New York City and their stories. The strength of his work is the range of perspectives and experiences he captures. His subjects vary in age, nationality, religion, and other demographics, and their individual stories reflect on different facets of the human experience, from struggles to heartbreak to inspiration. Some of his subjects tell him about past experiences steeped in nostalgia, while others consider their present and future predicaments. A powerful four-page spread shares the story of a student from Mott Hall Bridges Academy who named the principal of his school as the biggest influence in his life, inspiring Stanton to visit the school, photograph the principal, and hear her story. Another photo shows the same student and principal with President Obama in the Oval Office, followed by a portrait of the president and the story of his own greatest influence. New readers and seasoned fans can't help but become engrossed with the stories Stanton tells. Color photos. (Oct.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Kirkus Book Review

Photographer and author Stanton returns with a companion volume to Humans of New York (2013), this one with similarly affecting photographs of New Yorkers but also with some tales from his subjects' mouths. Readers of the first volumeand followers of the related site on Facebook and elsewherewill feel immediately at home. The author has continued to photograph the human zoo: folks out in the streets and in the parks, in moods ranging from parade-happy to deep despair. He includes one running feature"Today in Microfashion," which shows images of little children dressed up in various arresting ways. He also provides some juxtapositions, images and/or stories that are related somehow. These range from surprising to forced to barely tolerable. One shows a man with a cat on his head and a woman with a large flowered headpiece, another a construction worker proud of his body and, on the facing page, a man in a wheelchair. The emotions course along the entire continuum of human passion: love, broken love, elation, depression, playfulness, argumentativeness, madness, arrogance, humility, pride, frustration, and confusion. We see varieties of the human costume, as well, from formalwear to homeless-wear. A few celebrities appear, President Barack Obama among them. The "stories" range from single-sentence comments and quips and complaints to more lengthy tales (none longer than a couple of pages). People talk about abusive parents, exes, struggles to succeed, addiction and recovery, dramatic failures, and lifelong happiness. Some deliver minirants (a neuroscientist is especially curmudgeonly), and the children often provide the most (often unintended) humor. One little boy with a fishing pole talks about a monster fish. Toward the end, the images seem to lead us toward hope. But thena final photograph turns the light out once again. A wondrous mix of races, ages, genders, and social classes, and on virtually every page is a surprise. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.