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Far as the eye can see : a novel / Robert Bausch.

By: Bausch, Robert [author.].
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York ; London : Bloomsbury, 2014Description: 307 pages : map ; 24 cm.Content type: text | cartographic image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781620402597 (hardback); 1620402599 (hardback); 9781408844304 (paperback).Subject(s): Military deserters -- Fiction | Swindlers and swindling -- FictionGenre/Form: Action and adventure fiction. | Western stories. | Historical fiction. DDC classification: 813/.54
Contents:
A Union veteran several times over, Bobby Hale has repeatedly deserted and re-enlisted under different names to earn the enlistment bonus. After the civil war, he sets his heart on California, but only makes it as far as Montana. Now after shooting the wrong people he has to evade not only the US Army but also the native population. Across ten years and thousands of hard-won miles, Bobby comes to understand the wilderness through those he encounters.
Summary: A Union veteran several times over, Bobby Hale has repeatedly deserted and re-enlisted under different names to earn the enlistment bonus. After the civil war, he sets his heart on California, but only makes it as far as Montana. Now after shooting the wrong people he has to evade not only the US Army but also the native population. Against the growing conflict of the Great Sioux War, Bobby is travelling across the harsh horizon to make it back to Eveline, a poker-playing wagon owner who has taught him that he does not have to spend his life alone. Within miles of the woman he believes can save him, Hale's trigger finger lands him in trouble again, changing the course of his journey and setting him on a heart-stopping adventure across the Great Plains. Across ten years and thousands of hard-won miles, Bobby comes to understand the wilderness through those he encounters: the pioneers on the wagon trail who follow the glittering promise of gold; a Crow Brave who shows him meaning of real freedom and strength; and the militia men, still carrying the scars of the recent war, whose hatred of "Injuns" is even stronger than their fear. Far as the Eye Can See is the story of life in a place where every minute is an engagement in a kind of war of survival, and of how two people in the midst of such majesty and violence can manage to find a pathway to their own humanity.
List(s) this item appears in: Book Chat
Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Fiction Collection
Fiction Collection BAU 1 Available T00577142
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

<p>Bobby Hale is a Union veteran several times over. After the war, he sets his sights on California, but only makes it to Montana. As he stumbles around the West, from the Wyoming Territory to the Black Hills of the Dakotas, he finds meaning in the people he meets-settlers and native people-and the violent history he both participates in and witnesses. Far as the Eye Can See is the story of life in a place where every minute is an engagement in a kind of war of survival, and how two people-a white man and a mixed-race woman-in the midst of such majesty and violence can manage to find a pathway to their own humanity.</p> <p>Robert Bausch is the distinguished author of a body of work that is lively and varied, but linked by a thoughtfully complicated masculinity and an uncommon empathy. The unique voice of Bobby Hale manages to evoke both Cormac McCarthy and Mark Twain, guiding readers into Indian country and the Plains Wars in a manner both historically true and contemporarily relevant, as thoughts of race and war occupy the national psyche.</p>

A Union veteran several times over, Bobby Hale has repeatedly deserted and re-enlisted under different names to earn the enlistment bonus. After the civil war, he sets his heart on California, but only makes it as far as Montana. Now after shooting the wrong people he has to evade not only the US Army but also the native population. Across ten years and thousands of hard-won miles, Bobby comes to understand the wilderness through those he encounters.

A Union veteran several times over, Bobby Hale has repeatedly deserted and re-enlisted under different names to earn the enlistment bonus. After the civil war, he sets his heart on California, but only makes it as far as Montana. Now after shooting the wrong people he has to evade not only the US Army but also the native population. Against the growing conflict of the Great Sioux War, Bobby is travelling across the harsh horizon to make it back to Eveline, a poker-playing wagon owner who has taught him that he does not have to spend his life alone. Within miles of the woman he believes can save him, Hale's trigger finger lands him in trouble again, changing the course of his journey and setting him on a heart-stopping adventure across the Great Plains. Across ten years and thousands of hard-won miles, Bobby comes to understand the wilderness through those he encounters: the pioneers on the wagon trail who follow the glittering promise of gold; a Crow Brave who shows him meaning of real freedom and strength; and the militia men, still carrying the scars of the recent war, whose hatred of "Injuns" is even stronger than their fear. Far as the Eye Can See is the story of life in a place where every minute is an engagement in a kind of war of survival, and of how two people in the midst of such majesty and violence can manage to find a pathway to their own humanity.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Two time lines merge in Bausch's latest novel: in 1876 Bobby Hale and a mixed-race woman named Diana, aka Ink, struggle to survive in the beautiful but unforgiving lands of Montana and the Dakota territories. The unlikely pair-Bobby shot Ink and nursed her back to health-are on the run from her warrior husband, the U.S. Army, and Native Americans. Flashback to 1869: at various turns a trapper, a scout, and a wagon-train leader, Civil War vet Bobby meets a number of folks-soldiers, settlers, native peoples-in his journey of survival and self-redemption. Bobby faces life and death judgments through both time lines. VERDICT With two novels selected as Washington Post favorites-A Hole in the Earth and Out of Season-Bausch (English, North Virginia Community Coll.) captures the immense measure of the American landscape in his descriptions of the western setting. While the flashback section plods along, once the 1876 trail is picked up again, the tension builds as Bobby and Ink find themselves witnesses to Custer's Last Stand. Not to be missed by historical fiction fans. [For another fictional take on the Battle of the Little Bighorn, see also John Hough Jr.'s Little Big Horn.-Ed.]-Wendy W. Paige, Shelby Cty. P.L., Morristown, IN (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly Review

As expansive as the country it traverses, Bausch's majestic odyssey through the Old West finds rich nuance in a history often oversimplified. After the Civil War, hardscrabble veteran Bobby Hale heads toward California only to find that rampant violence plagues both his dreams and the vast landscape unrolling before him. Learning that trouble is everywhere, he leads a wagon train along the Oregon Trail, spends five seasons as a trapper, then reluctantly puts his knowledge of the land to use scouting for U.S. forces intent on rounding up native tribes. On one mission, he attacks a native peace party under the mistaken belief that they are warriors, violating the codes of whites and natives alike. As he tries to reach his home base near Bozeman, Mont., without incurring retaliation from either side, his encounters with a mixed-race woman, a young Indian boy, and the battling forces at Little Big Horn transform him. The novel's patient, searching first-person narration is finely balanced, with a voice at once straightforward and lyrical, grand and particular. Bausch's (Almighty Me!) characters defy facile judgments; each is sharply distinctive, yet all struggle to find a footing amid the clash of human difference that is, in Bobby Hale's words, the "most spacious war of all." (Nov.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Booklist Review

Bausch's eighth novel follows Civil War veteran Bobby Hale as he works his way through the American West. Bausch's voice is more Mark Twain than Larry McMurtry, and Hale shows more sympathy for the natives than do many lead characters in traditional westerns. The novel offers an admirably panoramic view of the Plains Wars, presenting all sides decently without unduly glamorizing any individual or group. Bausch is perceptive without being preachy, and he grants Hale a wide range of emotions while preserving a recognizable strand of stoic masculinity. Some of the historical elements, particularly Custer's Last Stand, feel like cameos, and, even in the world of the picaresque, Hale's journey grows aimless. The story crests when Hale stops to consider a frontier existence both familiar and unfamiliar: It ain't easy being on this earth for none of us because we know about future things and what we want or don't want, or we can be pretty damn confused by both wanting and not wanting. --Clouther, Kevin Copyright 2014 Booklist

Kirkus Book Review

Bausch (Out of Season, 2005, etc.) rides into frontier America for a tale of a Civil War veteran weary of "trouble and slaughter."Bobby Hale was a Union soldierseveral times. He "skedaddled"enlisted, took the bonus, deserted and enlisted again. Even so, Hale was in the ranks at bloody Fredericksburg and Chickamauga. Bausch's battle descriptions flash and roar"I shot into smoke and noise...wounded men caught fire where they lay...even now the screams keep echoing in my skull." In 1869, equipped with a Colt Dragoon, an Evans repeater rifle, and his mare, Cricket, Hale hooks onto a pioneer wagon train led by a man named Theo and his Crow scout, Big Tree, "six and a half feet tall and solid as stone." En route to Oregon, they winter in Montana. Hale and Big Tree head into the Rockies to trap, an adventure lasting years. Then a Sioux woman, who'd latched onto Hale, decides she prefers Big Tree. Hale repairs to Fort Ellis, Montana, and winters in a Conestoga wagon with widows Christine and Eveline"Those two women give me respite from strife and struggle"before enlisting as a scout. Bausch's research makes real the violent periodsowbelly and hardtack, militias murdering Indians, freezing blizzards. Scouting, Hale kills White Dog, a warrior who'd earlier killed Big Tree. But White Dog was part of a peace party, and Hale deserts. On the run, Hale accidentally wounds Ink, a half-breed captive fleeing her husband. The pair stumble onto the Battle of Little Big Horn, "ground...littered with dead horses and dead soldiers and a few Indians," before trekking into the "land of the Nez Perce...where Ink is certain we can be happy, and live in peace." With a setting gleaming with historical accuracy and a protagonist whose voice is right out of Twain, Bausch's novel is a worthy addition to America's Western literary canon, there to share shelf space with The Big Sky, Little Big Man and Lonesome Dove. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.