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The snow kimono / by Mark Henshaw.

By: Henshaw, Mark, 1951- [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Melbourne, Victoria : Text Publishing, 2014Copyright date: ©2014Description: 396 pages ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781922182340 (pbk.).Subject(s): Authors -- Fiction | Deception -- Fiction | Detectives -- Fiction | Life change events -- Fiction | Australian fiction -- 21st century | Paris (France) -- Fiction | Japan -- FictionGenre/Form: Thrillers (Fiction) | Detective and mystery fiction.DDC classification: A823.4 Summary: Paris: 1989. Recently retired Inspector of Police Auguste Jovert receives a letter from a woman who claims to be his daughter. Two days later, a stranger comes knocking on his door. Set in Paris and Japan, this novel tells the stories of Inspector Jovert, former Professor of Law, Tadashi Omura, and his one-time friend, the writer Katsuo Ikeda. All three men have lied to themselves, and to each other - and these lies are about to catch up with them.
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Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Fiction Collection
Fiction Collection HEN 1 Checked out 09/06/2020

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Winner of the prestigious Christina Stead Prize for Fiction, NSW Premier's Literary Awards 2015

'From Algiers to Tokyo, Henshaw creates indelible images...An intriguing contemplation on the nature of storytelling itself.'--Booklist Online

'Henshaw creates a world of psychological complexity and emotional subtlety in a story that moves from Paris to Japan and back again...Henshaw's prose shimmers as his narrative becomes ever more nuanced, complex, and misleading.'--Kirkus Reviews

'Casts a spell from the start...A highly original book full of small sensations with the bonus of being a joy to read.'--Shots Magazine, UK

'A novel of exquisite beauty.'--The Times [UK]

'A superb read.'--Bookmooch

'Complex, lucid and engrossing.'--Weekend Australian

'Gripping...Like a Japanese puzzle, prized for their infinite solutions and depth of revelation, each chapter builds on the one before, unfolding through levels of story to unpack deeper and deeper truths.'--Guardian Australia

'A work of extraordinary subtlety, excitement and intelligence...clever and exquisitely executed fiction.'--The Hoopla

'The writing is beautiful: pellucid and wonderfully visual, painting memorable landscape cameos.'--Adelaide Advertiser

'An exquisitely written puzzle.'--Australian Women's Weekly

'Stunning and hypnotic...Henshaw has rather written a deep reflection on life, memory, love and loss...You won't read another novel like The Snow Kimono this year, or perhaps for many to come.'--Asian Review of Books

Paris, 1989. Recently retired police inspector Auguste Jovert receives a letter from a woman who claims to be his daughter. Two days later, a stranger knocks on his door. His name is Tadashi Omura, and he is a former law professor. He tells Jovert stories about his life, and about a man named Katsuo Ikeda, whom he met when they were both children and who later became a successful writer.

Set in France, Japan, and Algeria, The Snow Kimono is a jigsaw puzzle of a novel. The stories that Jovert and Omura tell each other fit together in unpredictable ways. Each new story changes the possibilities of what might happen next. Little by little we glimpse how these men have lied to themselves and to each other. These lies are about to catch up with them.

A quarter of a century after the best-selling, multi-award-winning Out of the Line of Fire , Mark Henshaw returns with a novel that is both a psychological thriller and an unforgettable meditation on love and loss, memory and its deceptions, and the things that bind us to others.

Mark Henshaw has lived in France, Germany, Yugoslavia, and the United States. He currently lives in Canberra. His debut, Out of the Line of Fire (1988) was one of the biggest selling Australian literary novels of its decade and was published in France, Germany, and Italy.


Paris: 1989. Recently retired Inspector of Police Auguste Jovert receives a letter from a woman who claims to be his daughter. Two days later, a stranger comes knocking on his door. Set in Paris and Japan, this novel tells the stories of Inspector Jovert, former Professor of Law, Tadashi Omura, and his one-time friend, the writer Katsuo Ikeda. All three men have lied to themselves, and to each other - and these lies are about to catch up with them.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

Booklist Review

In this circuitous novel, Australian writer Henshaw brings together a Japanese law professor and a Parisian police detective, who slowly reveal themselves to one another through the stories they tell. Are the two mens' tales of estranged daughters born continents apart a coincidence, or do they connect? And what of Professor Omura's constant talk of an amoral friend who gained great power and took what he wanted? Is he sharing this with Inspector Jovert as a cautionary tale or a confession? From Algiers to Tokyo, Henshaw creates indelible images. Just as the two men get caught up in one another's stories, so too can the reader almost feel the cold on the road down a snowy mountain in Japan or smell the smoke-stained remains of a bombed-out house on the Mediterranean. Twenty-five years after publishing his award-winning Out of the Line of Fire, Henshaw has written an intriguing contemplation on the nature of storytelling itself.--Keefe, Karen Copyright 2010 Booklist

Kirkus Book Review

Henshaw creates a world of psychological complexity and emotional subtlety in a story that moves from Paris to Japan and back again. Auguste Jovert has been retired only a few months as inspector of police in Paris when he's startled to receive a letter and photograph from his daughter, Mathilde, who only recently discovered her father's identity. Thirty years earlier he'd worked in Algeria, where he met Mathilde's mother. His immediate impulse is to crush the photograph and think it's "too late," and for a while, this particular mystery is put aside. Shortly thereafter, however, Jovert meets a neighbor, Tadashi Omura, a law professor at the Imperial University of Japan now living in Paris, who comes with his own cryptic issues about fathers and daughters. He spins a mesmerizing story about his relationship with Fumiko, whom he treats as a daughter though he claims she is not. In a series of detailed flashbacks he presents their relationship, on which one lie is piled onto anotherfor example, that Sachiko, Fumiko's mother, died in childbirth. In the interstices of his long conversations with Omura, Jovert takes tentative steps to find Mathilde by using some of his contacts at police headquarters. Eventually the narrative of Omura's past becomes ascendant and throws Jovert's story into the background. We learn particularly lurid details about Omura's friendship with Katsuo Ikeda, a brilliant student and friend of Omura's, who becomes a writer and lives a profligate and amoral life, culminating in a murder. But with Omura, nothing is at it seems, and we find Ikeda's life has also been constructed of elaborate fabrications. Henshaw's prose shimmers as his narrative becomes ever more nuanced, complex, and misleading. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.