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Woven scarves : 26 inspired designs for the rigid heddle loom / Jane Patrick & Stephanie Flynn Sokolov.

By: Patrick, Jane [author.].
Contributor(s): Sokolov, Stephanie Flynn.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Loveland, Colorado : Interweave, [2014]Copyright date: ©2014Description: 159 pages : color illustrations ; 23 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781620331194; 1620331195.Subject(s): Hand weaving -- Patterns | ScarvesDDC classification: 746.9/6
Contents:
Introduction -- 1. Plain weave (Chunky check ; Windowpane plaid ; Go to work ; Log cabin ; Skwoosh ; Plaid muffler ; Bobble scarf) -- 2. Designing with yarn (Flower power ; Posh plum ; Ladies who lunch ; Midnight in Paris ; Stainless steel scarf ; Stash buster scarf) -- 3. Exploring pattern (Sun shower ; Lavender lace ; Eyelet scarf ; Lattice scarf ; Shaggy scarf) -- 4. Altered surfaces (Spaced and felted scarf ; Gypsy dancer ; Peter Pan collar ; Felt resist bananagram scarf ; Recycled sweater scarf ; Fringy collar ; Metamorphosis ; Steampunk scarf) -- Appendix (Direct peg warping ; Measuring a warop on a warping board ; Hemstitching ; Winding a shuttle ; How much yarn do I have?)
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction
Non-Fiction 746.14 PAT 1 Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Explore and practice weaving techniques for fabulous scarves!

Woven Scarves offers a collection of twenty-six scarves and variations that range in difficulty from advanced beginner to very complex. In highly approachable ways, authors Jane Patrick and Stephanie Flynn Sokolov introduce new weavers to a broad sampling of weaving techniques, exploring various ways of creating cloth on a rigid heddle loom. Weavers learn how to create lovely scarves that are creative, classic, and fun to make and wear. Using various weave structures, color, yarn combinations, and techniques such as felting and embellishment, the authors take you through the basics to a jumping-off point for personal exploration and creation.

Woven Scarves will support new weavers in their desire for appropriate patterns and better skills as well as a deeper understanding of fibers, types of weave techniques, and all the varieties of fabrics that are possible--even to beginners.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 157) and index.

Introduction -- 1. Plain weave (Chunky check ; Windowpane plaid ; Go to work ; Log cabin ; Skwoosh ; Plaid muffler ; Bobble scarf) -- 2. Designing with yarn (Flower power ; Posh plum ; Ladies who lunch ; Midnight in Paris ; Stainless steel scarf ; Stash buster scarf) -- 3. Exploring pattern (Sun shower ; Lavender lace ; Eyelet scarf ; Lattice scarf ; Shaggy scarf) -- 4. Altered surfaces (Spaced and felted scarf ; Gypsy dancer ; Peter Pan collar ; Felt resist bananagram scarf ; Recycled sweater scarf ; Fringy collar ; Metamorphosis ; Steampunk scarf) -- Appendix (Direct peg warping ; Measuring a warop on a warping board ; Hemstitching ; Winding a shuttle ; How much yarn do I have?)

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Patrick (Time To Weave) and Sokolov (columnist, "Yearning To Weave and Spin"), coworkers at Schacht Spindle Company, may be expert weavers, but they see great potential in rigid heddle looms, which are easier to warp than most floor looms. In their first collaborative book, the authors present a collection of scarves-perfect projects for the rigid heddle loom, which limits the project width. The scarves are evenly divided between everyday wearable pieces, such as traditional plaids or finely woven lace, and quirky creations involving novelty yarns, including a collar that bears an unfortunate resemblance to a mop head. Almost all of the scarves are made using readily available knitting yarn, and a clear, full-sized photograph of the project yarn wrapped around a one-inch piece of cardboard helps weavers make appropriate substitutions. Some of the most interesting information is related to finishing, including felting, fulling, resist felting, and discharge dyeing, which adds visual interest to the finished product. VERDICT Inexpensive rigid heddle looms are marketed to knitters and crocheters, and these beginner friendly projects will inspire weavers-and help them use up some of their yarn. (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.