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When two cultures meet, the New Zealand experience / John Robinson.

By: Robinson, John, 1940-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Wellington [N.Z.] : Tross Pub., c2012Description: 280 pages, [8] pages of plates : illustrations (some color) ; 21 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781872970318 (pbk.) :; 9781872970318 (pbk.); 1872970311 (pbk.).Other title: New Zealand experience.Subject(s): Maori (New Zealand people) -- Government relations -- 19th century | Maori (New Zealand people) -- Government relations | Maori (New Zealand people) -- Wars | Noho-ā-iwi | Kōrero nehe | Pakanga | New Zealand -- Race relations | New Zealand -- HistoryDDC classification: 305.8994420993
Contents:
Includes bibliographical references (p. 270-275) and index.
Includes bibliographical references (p. 270-275) and index. -This is a" book that rips apart the treaty orthodoxy that has fuddled governments for the past 30 years, and points a finger at an array of celebrated academics who have dressed up their beliefs as fact, either out of evangelical zeal or for financial benefit. Robinson concludes that "the rewriting of history - with Maori presented as passive victims of massive British wrongdoing, and the glorification of murderous rebels - together with funding of a substantial industry to seek out and amplify an ever-growing list of grievances, have provided the intellectual and ideological platform for armed insurrection."
Summary: "This is the story of the meeting of two very different peoples and the steady building of the one nation promised by Hobson at the first signing of the Treaty of Waitangi ... The conflict between some Māori and the government was a direct consequence of cultural stresses and the rebellion of a few tribes against the new authority, and there was little impact on Māori numbers and health from that fighting or from loss of land. Māori have profited considerably from increasing equality ... and, as this book shows, Treaty grievances are not well founded"--Back cover.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due
Heritage & Archives Alexander Library | Te Rerenga Mai o Te Kauru
Heritage Collections
Heritage Collections (Mainroom) 305.8994 ROB 1 Checked Out
Te Taurawhiri Non-Fiction Alexander Library | Te Rerenga Mai o Te Kauru
Te Taurawhiri
Te Taurawhiri 305.8994 ROB 2 Available
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction
Non-Fiction 305.8994 ROB 1 Checked out 25/08/2020

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Author John Robinson, a former university lecturer and research scientist, contends that the treaty orthodoxy has fuddled governments for the past 30 years, and points a finger at an array of celebrated academics who have dressed up their beliefs as fact, either out of evangelical zeal or for financial benefit. His book is the story of the meeting of two very different peoples and the steady building of the one nation promised by Hobson at the first signing of the Treaty of Waitangi. The Maori were Polynesians who had been moving across the vast Pacific for millennia, separated from the great mass of humanity, and had remained a tribal, Stone Age, people. The British had shared in the considerable advances of civilisation, through the Iron Age to the Industrial Revolution and the growth of cities in nation states. By the end of the eighteenth century they had come to recognise the rights of all peoples and had become concerned with the great harm done by previous European explorers and colonists. That remarkable change, largely carried out consciously, is absent in today's discourse, sadly buried beneath a blanket of denial of positive British intentions and actions, and ignoring the desires of Maori for a change from their dysfunctional traditional culture, from tribalism to rule by a central authority that alone could bring peace and security. The true story is here built on the observations of those who were present at the time, and the often absurd proclamations of revisionist historians are corrected. The comprehensive description here of what did happen includes an understanding of the reasons why the Maori population decreased through the nineteenth century. The conflict between some Maori and the goverment was a direct consequence of cultural stresses and the rebellion of a few tribes against the new authority, and there was little impact on Maori numbers and health from that fighting or from loss of land. Maori have profited considerably from increasing equality in the modern world and, as this book shows, Treaty grievances are not well founded.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 270-275) and index.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 270-275) and index.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 270-275) and index. -This is a" book that rips apart the treaty orthodoxy that has fuddled governments for the past 30 years, and points a finger at an array of celebrated academics who have dressed up their beliefs as fact, either out of evangelical zeal or for financial benefit. Robinson concludes that "the rewriting of history - with Maori presented as passive victims of massive British wrongdoing, and the glorification of murderous rebels - together with funding of a substantial industry to seek out and amplify an ever-growing list of grievances, have provided the intellectual and ideological platform for armed insurrection."

"This is the story of the meeting of two very different peoples and the steady building of the one nation promised by Hobson at the first signing of the Treaty of Waitangi ... The conflict between some Māori and the government was a direct consequence of cultural stresses and the rebellion of a few tribes against the new authority, and there was little impact on Māori numbers and health from that fighting or from loss of land. Māori have profited considerably from increasing equality ... and, as this book shows, Treaty grievances are not well founded"--Back cover.

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