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Americans in Paris : life and death under Nazi occupation, 1940-1944 / Charles Glass.

By: Glass, Charles, 1951-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London : HarperPress, 2010Edition: HarperPress pbk. edition.Description: xvi, 524 pages, [16] pages of plates : illustrations, maps, portraits ; 20 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780007228522 (pbk.); 000722852X (pbk.).Subject(s): Americans -- France -- Paris -- History -- 20th century | World War, 1939-1945 -- France -- Paris | Paris (France) -- History -- 1940-1944 | Paris (France) -- Intellectual life -- 20th century | France -- History -- German occupation, 1940-1945DDC classification: 944.360041309044 | 944/.3610816092313
Contents:
Pt. 1: 14 June 1940. The American mayor of Paris -- The bookseller -- The Countess from Ohio -- All blood runs red -- 'Le Millionnaire américain' -- The Yankee doctor -- Pt. 2: 1940. Bookshop row -- Americans at Vichy -- Back to Paris -- In love with love -- A French prisoner with the Americans -- American grandees -- Polly's Paris -- Rugged individualists -- Germany's confidential American agent -- Pt. 3: 1941. The coldest winter -- Time to go? -- New perils in Paris -- Utopia in Les Landes -- To resist, to collaborate or to endure -- Enemy aliens -- Pt. 4: 1942. First round-up -- The Vichy web -- The second round-up -- 'Inturned' -- Uniting Africa -- Americans go to war -- Murphy forgets a friend -- Alone at Vittel -- The Bedaux Dossier -- Pt. 5: 1943. Murphy vesus Bedaux -- Sylvia's war -- German agents? -- A hospital at war -- The adolescent spy -- Clara under suspicion -- Calumnies -- Pt. 6: 1944. The trial of citizen Bedaux -- The underground railway -- Conspiracies -- Springtime in Paris -- The Marquis to arms! -- Résistants unmasked -- Via Dolorosa -- Schwarze Kappelle -- Slaves of the Reich -- One family now -- The Paris front -- Tout Mourir -- Pt. 7: 24-26 August 1944. Liberating the rooftops -- Libération, not Liberation.
Summary: Acclaimed journalist Glass looks to the American expatriate experience of Nazi-occupied Paris to reveal a fascinating forgotten history of the greatest generation. A moving and deeply thought-provoking book.--"Sunday Telegraph."
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

An elegantly written and highly informative account of a group of Americans living in Paris when the city fell to the Nazis in June 1940.

In the early hours of 14 June 1940, Nazi troops paraded through the streets of Paris, marking the beginning of the city's four-year occupation. French troops withdrew in order to avoid a battle and the potential destruction of their capital. It wasn't long before German tanks rumbled past the Arc de Triomphe and down the Champs Elysees to the Place de la Concorde.

The American community in Paris was the largest in Continental Europe, totalling approximately 30,000 before the Second World War. Although Ambassodor Bullitt advised those without vital business in the city to leave in 1939, over half of the Americans in Paris chose to stay. Many had professional and family ties to the city; the majority, though, had a peculiarly American love for the city, rooted in the bravery of the Marquis de la Fayette and the 17,000 Frenchmen who volunteered to fight for American independence in 1776.

An eclectic group, they included black soldiers from the Harlem Hellfighters, who were determined not to return to the racial segregation that they faced at home, rich socialites like Peggy Guggenheim and Florence Jay Gould, as well as painters, musicians, bankers and businessmen. There were those whose lives went on as if the Germans were ephemera, those who collaborated and those, like Dr Sumner Jackson and Etta Shiber, who worked underground for the resistance movement.

This is a book about adventure, intrigue, passion and deceit, and one which follows its characters into the Maquis, the concentration camps and overseas. Filled with a huge amount of new analysis on the Second World War, 'Americans in Paris' is a fascinating, revealing and moving read.

Originally published: 2009.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Pt. 1: 14 June 1940. The American mayor of Paris -- The bookseller -- The Countess from Ohio -- All blood runs red -- 'Le Millionnaire américain' -- The Yankee doctor -- Pt. 2: 1940. Bookshop row -- Americans at Vichy -- Back to Paris -- In love with love -- A French prisoner with the Americans -- American grandees -- Polly's Paris -- Rugged individualists -- Germany's confidential American agent -- Pt. 3: 1941. The coldest winter -- Time to go? -- New perils in Paris -- Utopia in Les Landes -- To resist, to collaborate or to endure -- Enemy aliens -- Pt. 4: 1942. First round-up -- The Vichy web -- The second round-up -- 'Inturned' -- Uniting Africa -- Americans go to war -- Murphy forgets a friend -- Alone at Vittel -- The Bedaux Dossier -- Pt. 5: 1943. Murphy vesus Bedaux -- Sylvia's war -- German agents? -- A hospital at war -- The adolescent spy -- Clara under suspicion -- Calumnies -- Pt. 6: 1944. The trial of citizen Bedaux -- The underground railway -- Conspiracies -- Springtime in Paris -- The Marquis to arms! -- Résistants unmasked -- Via Dolorosa -- Schwarze Kappelle -- Slaves of the Reich -- One family now -- The Paris front -- Tout Mourir -- Pt. 7: 24-26 August 1944. Liberating the rooftops -- Libération, not Liberation.

Acclaimed journalist Glass looks to the American expatriate experience of Nazi-occupied Paris to reveal a fascinating forgotten history of the greatest generation. A moving and deeply thought-provoking book.--"Sunday Telegraph."

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Once upon a time, historians told stories about the brave and the cowardly, about heroes, villains, and the many whose lives lay somewhere in between. That's what Glass (former chief Middle East correspondent, ABC News; Tribes with Flags) has done in this extraordinary narrative of the lives of the nearly 5000 Americans who lived in Paris during the German occupation from June 1940 to August 1944. For Clara de Chambrun, related by marriage to FDR on one side and the Vichy premier Laval on the other, life went on much as before-dinners at Maxim's, fine wine, dresses from Schiaparelli. But Sumner Jackson, chief surgeon at the American Hospital, was at constant risk for his work with the Resistance, spiriting Allied soldiers out of Paris. Millionaire Pierre Bedaux carried on business as usual, only with Germany now. Eventually arrested by the United States and charged with treason, he killed himself rather than face public humiliation. Glass is scrupulously fair to his subjects: there are no clear-cut villains in this story (although there are some heroes). VERDICT This is outstanding popular history, well researched and told and never oversimplified. It's difficult to conceive of anyone who wouldn't enjoy this exceptional book.-David Keymer, Modesto, CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Booklist Review

When the German army marched into Paris on June 14, 1940, approximately 5,000 Americans remained in Paris. They had refused or been unable to leave for many different reasons; their actions during the course of the German occupation would prove to be just as varied. Glass interweaves the experiences of some of the individuals who belonged to this unique colony of American expatriates living in Paris. Among the stories highlighted are those of Charles Bedaux, an American millionaire determined to carry on with his business affairs as usual; Sylvia Beach, owner of the famous English-language bookstore Shakespeare & Company; Clara Longworth de Chambrun, patroness of the American Library in Paris and distantly related to FDR; and Dr. Sumner Jackson, the American Hospital's chief surgeon. These fascinating tales reflect the complicated network of choices passive compromise, outright collaboration, patient retreat, and active resistance that existed for Americans caught in the German web.--Flanagan, Margaret Copyright 2009 Booklist