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German voices : memories of life during Hitler's Third Reich / Frederic C. Tubach with Sally Patterson Tubach.

By: Tubach, Frederic C.
Contributor(s): Tubach, Sally P. (Sally Patterson), 1946-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Berkeley : University of California Press, c2011Description: xvii, 273 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780520269644 (hbk.); 0520269640 (hbk.).Subject(s): National socialism -- Social aspects | World War, 1939-1945 -- Social aspects -- Germany | World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, German | Germany -- History -- 1933-1945 | Germany -- Social conditions -- 1933-1945 | Germany -- Social life and customs -- 20th century | Germany -- History -- 1933-1945 -- BiographyDDC classification: 943.086
Contents:
Jobs and the Olympic games -- Jungvolk and Hitler youth -- War and the Holocaust -- In search of individuals -- German soldiers write home.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction
Non-Fiction 943.086 TUB 1 Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

What was it like to grow up German during Hitler's Third Reich? In this extraordinary book, Frederic C. Tubach returns to the country of his roots to interview average Germans who, like him, came of age between 1933 and 1945. Tubach sets their recollections and his own memories into a broad historical overview of Nazism--a regime that shaped minds through persuasion (meetings, Nazi Party rallies, the 1936 Olympics, the new mass media of radio and film) and coercion (violence and political suppression). The voices of this long-overlooked population--ordinary people who were neither victims nor perpetrators--reveal the rich complexity of their attitudes and emotions. The book also presents selections from approximately 80,000 unpublished letters (now archived in Berlin) written during the war by civilians and German soldiers. Tubach powerfully provides new insights into Germany's most tragic years, offering a nuanced response to the abiding question of how a nation made the quantum leap from anti-Semitism to systematic genocide.

Includes bibliographical references.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 263-273).

Jobs and the Olympic games -- Jungvolk and Hitler youth -- War and the Holocaust -- In search of individuals -- German soldiers write home.

11 115

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • List of Figures (p. ix)
  • Preface (p. xi)
  • Acknowledgments (p. xv)
  • Introduction (p. 1)
  • 1 Jobs and the Olympic Games (p. 20)
  • 2 Jungvolk and Hitler Youth (p. 42)
  • 3 War and the Holocaust (p. 60)
  • 4 In Search of Individuals (p. 100)
  • 5 German Soldiers Write Home (p. 198)
  • Notes (p. 263)

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Booklist Review

In An Uncommon Friendship: From Opposite Sides of the Holocaust (2001), Tubach and coauthors made a bold statement of reconciliation by collaborating on a shared memoir of WWII. With his latest book, Tubach further explores the war's impact on average Germans. After a brief set of essays on the rise of Nazism and the trajectory of the war, paying particular attention to Nazi rhetoric and the calculated manner in which the Tubach's generation was manipulated into turning against its elders by the Nazis, Tubach then turns to the main focus: interviews with German war survivors. They were draftees, civilians, children; refugees during the war; they experienced varied levels of hardship during and after the war, but the war determined the trajectories of each of their lives, and Tubach tells their stories with considerable empathy and sensitivity. He also reproduces portions of letters written by German soldiers. A counterpoint to sweeping historical theories that would categorize all Germans as complicit in the evil of Nazism, this is also a powerful and engaging reminder that history is composed of individual human lives.--Driscoll, Brenda. Copyright 2010 Booklist