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Lonely Planet guide to experimental travel / Rachael Antony and Joel Henry.

By: Antony, Rachael.
Contributor(s): Henry, Joel.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Melbourne ; Oakland : Lonely Planet, 2005Description: 276 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 20 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 1741044502 (hbk.).Other title: Guide to experimental travel | Experimental travel.Subject(s): Travel -- Guidebooks | Voyages and travelsDDC classification: 910.202 ANT
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

The new phenomenon of experimental tourism, developed by Joel Henry, founder of the Laboratory of Experimental Tourism, has turned the way we travel on its head.Humorous, engaging and practical, Lonely Planet Guide to Experimental Travel encourages travellers to experience different ways of seeing and behaving, to be open to new experiences and to let chance be the guide.Part philosophy, part guide to a new way of travelling, this user-friendly, tongue-in-cheek manual-style book includes 60 practical experiments to follow-great for exploring new places or even for gaining a new perspective on your own city. Experimental Travel comes with helpful, funny illustrations and diagrams, blank pages for notes and protective plastic sleeves for use on the road."Sick of sightseeing? Tired of tour guides? Then why not try experimental tourism, a novel approach to travel that starts with a quirky concept and can lead anywhere from Bora Bora to a bus stop." -CNN.com

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Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • What is Experimental Travel? (p. 4)
  • How to Use This Book (p. 5)
  • Q & A with Rachael & Joel (p. 6)
  • A Potted History of Experimental Travel (p. 13)
  • Latourex: Le Laboratoire de Tourisme Experimental (p. 25)
  • Experimental Quiz (p. 33)
  • Experiments and Laboratory Results (p. 35)
  • 1 Aesthetic Travel (p. 36)
  • 2 Airport Tourism (p. 42)
  • 3 Alternating Travel (p. 48)
  • 4 Anachronistic Adventure (p. 52)
  • 5 Ariadne's Thread (p. 56)
  • 6 Automatic Travel (p. 62)
  • 7 Backpacking at Home (p. 66)
  • 8 Barman's Knock (p. 72)
  • 9 Blind Man's Buff Travel (p. 76)
  • 10 Budget Tourism (p. 80)
  • 11 Bureaucratic Odyssey (p. 86)
  • 12 Chance Travel (p. 90)
  • 13 Confluence Seeking (p. 96)
  • 14 Counter Tourism (p. 100)
  • 15 Dog Leg Travel (p. 108)
  • 16 Domestic Travel (p. 114)
  • 17 Ero Tourism (p. 120)
  • 18 Expedition to K2 (p. 126)
  • 19 Experimental Honeymoon (p. 130)
  • 20 Exquisite Corpse Gad About (p. 138)
  • 21 Fly By Night (p. 144)
  • 22 Horse Head Adventure (p. 150)
  • 23 Human Chess (p. 156)
  • 24 Literary Journey (p. 160)
  • 25 Lyrical Tourism (p. 166)
  • 26 Mascot Travel (p. 170)
  • 27 Monopoly Travel (p. 176)
  • 28 Nostalgia Trip (p. 180)
  • 29 Opus Touristicus (p. 188)
  • 30 Red Carnation Crusade (p. 194)
  • 31 Rent a Tourist (p. 200)
  • 32 Slight Hitch Travel (p. 204)
  • 33 Slow Return Travel (p. 208)
  • 34 Synchronised Travel (p. 212)
  • 35 Taking a Line for a Walk (p. 218)
  • 36 Thalasso Experimental (p. 226)
  • 37 Travel Pursuit (p. 230)
  • 38 Trip Poker (p. 234)
  • 39 Twelve Travel (p. 238)
  • 40 Voyage to the End of the Line (p. 242)
  • Appendices (p. 247)
  • Yellow Arrow (p. 249)
  • The Travel Pie (p. 260)
  • The World's Your Oyster (p. 271)
  • Acknowledgments (p. 274)

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Publishers Weekly Review

Those aching for a relief from packaged tours or Club Med vacations would do well to pick up this out-of-the-ordinary guide. It's a manual for "experimental travel," a "playful" and "pleasingly vague" style of vacation, "where the journey's methodology is clear but the destination may be unknown." For example, Aesthetic Travel (which gets the lowest score for degree of difficulty) has readers creating an artistic record of their trip in a systematic but uncommon way, whether by photographing the fire station in every new town they visit or writing a poem in every main square. Trip Poker is riskier: four people roll the dice, and the winner gets to choose the destination; the loser pays for the weekend. It's a gimmick, but at least it's an entertaining one: for each experiment (and there are more than 40) comes a report written by a contributor or one of the authors, as well as b&w photos and illustrations with a quirky, Victorian bent. Antony and Henry are well-traveled journalists with plenty of experience, and they certainly get points for originality. If nothing else, their unusual book reminds us of the joy of discovery. (June) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved