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Let's count goats / words by Mem Fox, goats by Jan Thomas.

By: Fox, Mem, 1946-.
Contributor(s): Thomas, Jan, 1958- [illustrator.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Camberwell, Vic. : Penguin/Viking, 2010Description: 1 volume (unpaged) : illustrations color ; 23 x 26 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780670075058.Other title: Let us count goats.Subject(s): Goats -- Pictorial works -- Juvenile fiction | Counting -- Pictorial works -- Juvenile fictionGenre/Form: Stories in rhyme. | Picture booksDDC classification: A823.3
Contents:
Rhyming text that will have children smiling as they count the ever increasing goats.
Summary: The inimitable Mem Fox draws the young child into a world of discovery, through simple, evocative, rhythmic words.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

This wonderful picture book by acclaimed author Mem Fox has a wonderful, rollicking, rhyming text reminiscent of Where is the Green Sheep? And just like the super successful Green Sheep, early readers will be memorising the simple text  - as well as honing their numeracy skills with all the crazy goats to count!

Rhyming text that will have children smiling as they count the ever increasing goats.

The inimitable Mem Fox draws the young child into a world of discovery, through simple, evocative, rhythmic words.

For pre-school age.

Ages 2+.

6 7 8 9 15 18 20 22 27 62 89 104 109 114 115 138 149 159 162 177

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Publishers Weekly Review

This animated counting book uses irreverent couplets and a screwball cast of goats for its humor. As if Thomas's goats weren't entertaining enough just to look at (and they are), Fox (Ten Little Fingers and Ten Little Toes) pairs random and often mischievous goat activities with invitations for readers to count the wide-eyed animals. "Here we see a fireman goat climbing through the smoke./ But can we count the RESCUED goats trying not to choke?" And when the narrator says, "Here we see an over goat. And this one's going under," a page turn reveals the question, "But can we count the CROSSING goats, terrified of thunder?" (The goats are seen nervously rowing a boat during a storm.) Thomas (the Dust Bunny books) sets her taupe goats against bright, solid backdrops; whether they are pricking up their ears, jumping off monkey bars, huddled in the snow, or blasting their trumpets, they exude personality and slapstick humor. The only number that shows up in the text is "one," (the book goes up to 10), giving kids the opportunity to practice counting without any hints. Ages 2-6. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

School Library Journal Review

PreS-K-The title says it all. Fox and Thomas draw viewers in through catchy phrases and amusing pictures of goats that appear in a variety of shapes, sizes, and numbers. As they romp across the bright, colorful pages, their antics will make children giggle; more importantly, the text encourages listeners to look carefully at what is happening. For example, the number of goats increases as the pages turn, and the author's questions concerning them will motivate viewers to examine the images and figure out the answers. A clever counting lesson.-Barbara Elleman, Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, Amherst, MA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Booklist Review

Bright electric colors (tennis-ball green, sky blue, and sunny yellow) outlined in thick black create just the right look to attract very young readers, who are also often just learning to count. The silly-looking, appealing cartoon goats sport more natural colors in shades of brown, and they do goaty things, such as eat inedible stuff, but beyond that, reality's suspended, and imagination takes over. These goats play trumpets, fly planes, throw snowballs, and more. Scenes showing a goat doing something a kid might be familiar with alternate with spreads asking listeners to count a specific set of goats doing a related activity ( Here we see an airport goat looking for her cases. But can we count the PILOT goats with goggles on their faces? ). This is a bit more challenging than some counting books; beginning counters may not yet be familiar with the concept of adjectives, which indicate which goats are to be tallied. But this adds to the appeal, providing a fun learning opportunity for kids with varying skill sets.--Foote, Diane Copyright 2010 Booklist

Horn Book Review

Lilting rhymes urge readers to count goats throughout this silly-for-silliness-sake book: "Here we see an airport goat looking for her cases. / But can we count the pilot goats with goggles on their faces?" Cartoonish bold-hued illustrations of the goats, boldly outlined in black line, reflect the story's carefree absurdity. (c) Copyright 2011. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Kirkus Book Review

The traditional counting format receives a charming update as playfully expressive goats mimic human behavior. While these floppy-eared, flat-nosed animals may play the trumpet or throw a snowball, the lure of hot sandcastles or crunchy umbrella stands prove delicious distractions for the frisky friends. The lilting rhymes nicely capture the building energy. As the growing menagerie frolics across each page, pointed questions encourage audience participation. "Here we see a soccer goat roaring at the ref! / But can we count the CHEERING goats who must be going deaf?" Fox, an early-literacy specialist to the core, gets each rhyme just right, though this hasn't the sublime predictability of her spectacular Where Is the Green Sheep? (illustrated by Judy Horacek, 2004). Thomas's trademark digital spreads provide punch through chunky, dark outlines and zany off-kilter expressions: The slant of an eyebrow or the turn of an ear--not to mention all those beards--makes for some seriously funny faces. The distinctive Grenadine type, which allows each all-uppercase word to pop dramatically, suits the bold backdrops. These wacky goats guarantee a goofy good time. (Picture book. 2-5)]] Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.