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Assassination day / Clive Egleton.

By: Egleton, Clive.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London : Hodder & Stoughton, 2003Description: 376 pages ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0340820403.Subject(s): Intelligence officers -- FictionGenre/Form: Thrillers (Fiction)DDC classification: Rental Fiction Review: "Ross Frazer. Ex-Intelligence. Ex-Assassin. And dead - Or is he?" "SIS officer Will Landon assumes he has a simple case ahead of him when asked to investigate the sensational autobiography by the mysterious Ross Frazer." "It gets complicated when two people associated with the book are murdered. With only silence from his superiors and two bogus intelligence officers on his tail, one girl's recollection of the original document is all Landon has to go on. With time running out he needs to start making some connections...and fast."--BOOK JACKET.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Will Landon is tasked with investigating the sensational autobiography of ex-intelligence officer and assassin Ross Frazer. The job seems simple but soon two people associated with the book are dead and with only silence from his superiors and documents disappearing, time is running out.

"Ross Frazer. Ex-Intelligence. Ex-Assassin. And dead - Or is he?" "SIS officer Will Landon assumes he has a simple case ahead of him when asked to investigate the sensational autobiography by the mysterious Ross Frazer." "It gets complicated when two people associated with the book are murdered. With only silence from his superiors and two bogus intelligence officers on his tail, one girl's recollection of the original document is all Landon has to go on. With time running out he needs to start making some connections...and fast."--BOOK JACKET.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

Publishers Weekly Review

If anyone can keep the old-fashioned spy novel alive, it's British veteran Egleton (Cry Havoc; etc.). As usual, he starts things off with a bang: a leading London literary agent receives a tell-all memoir written by an intelligence officer who died in 1989 under highly suspicious circumstances. Before you can say "hot property," the London agent is murdered by two fake cops; the New York bookshop owner who came upon the manuscript is also violently offed; and Peter Ashton-a top SIS officer regarded by his enemies as a loose cannon and by his admirers as a brilliant field agent perhaps unsuited to a desk job-is put in charge. Ashton's wife not only has to help him protect the beautiful young American literary agent who was first offered the memoir but also has to cope with increasing suspicions that Jill Sheridan, Ashton's old flame who was well on her way to becoming head of SIS until she was forced to resign, is somehow behind all the book-related bloodshed. Egleton uses his obvious insider knowledge of intelligence antics to keep his story moving along briskly. Agent, Phyllis Westberg. (Aug.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Kirkus Book Review

The prolific Egleton pits his Brit superspy against a blur of assorted enemies. Inevitably, there's your basic den of fanatical terrorists, but then the list turns motley. Included are the CIA, the FBI, other acronymic entities on both sides of the pond, a vengeful former girlfriend, an ambitious literary opportunist, and, of course, that never-ending supply of bureaucratic back-biters, Peter Ashton's colleagues in Her Majesty's Secret Intelligence Service. A storm is gathering. Ashton (Cry Havoc, 2003, etc.) first encounters it in the form of a manuscript reputedly written by a onetime British intelligence officer. Supposedly, the material in it is explosive, possibly detrimental to SIS and, by extension, to the nation itself. The author is dead, and so, in short order, are two more who knew of the manuscript's existence. Currently, it's in the hands of a young American woman who claims to be a literary agent, a lie. So who is she? Ashton assigns Will Landon, one of his best, to investigate, an effort somewhat impeded by dazzling legs and Landon's susceptibility. In the meantime, Ashton finds himself squaring off against Jill Sheridan, his ex-fiancÉe, who was once on the fast track to becoming SIS's first female Director General until derailed by a series of tactical errors--her own, though she's never stopped blaming Ashton for them. Now a flurry of additional questions: Is the manuscript for real? If so, how does Jill connect to it? More urgently, how does she connect to a certain Telal Asir, paymaster for Islamic Jihad? Enough: Ashton, never a fan of "the Micawber approach to life," decides it's time to step up to proactivity. The Ashton step seems a bit less springy here. Or maybe it's just that the blur of enemies makes it hard for the reader to work up a really good, page-turning hate. Copyright ©Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.