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The perfume garden / Kate Lord Brown.

By: Brown, Kate Lord.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London : Corvus, 2012Description: 479 pages ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781848879331 (pbk.); 1848879334 (pbk.).Subject(s): Letters -- Fiction | Memory -- Fiction | Valencia (Spain Region) Fiction | Valencia (Spain) -- Fiction | Valencia (Spain : Region) -- FictionGenre/Form: Domestic fiction. | General fiction.DDC classification: 823.92
Contents:
Guided by a series of letters and a key bequeathed to her, Emma Temple leaves London to restore an old abandoned villa in Valencia, Spain. For her grandmother, this house evokes terrible memories of Spain's civil war. As the house gives up its secrets, Emma is drawn into a story of lost love and families ripped apart by war.
Summary: High in the hills of Valencia, a forgotten house guards its secrets. Untouched since Franco's forces tore through Spain in 1936, the whitewashed walls have crumbled, the garden, laden with orange blossom, grown wild. Emma Temple is the first to unlock its doors in seventy years. Guided by a series of letters and a key bequeathed in her mother's will, she has left her job as London's leading perfumier to restore this dilapidated villa to its former glory. It is the perfect retreat: a wilderness redolent with strange and exotic scents, heavy with the colours and sounds of a foreign time. But for her grandmother, Freya, a British nurse who stayed here during Spain's devastating civil war, Emma's new home evokes terrible memories. As the house begins to give up its secrets, Emma is drawn deeper into Freya's story: a story of crushed idealism, of lost love, and of families ripped apart by war. She soon realises it is one thing letting go of the past, but another when it won't let go of you.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

The Perfume Garden is a sumptuous, escapist story of lost love and family secrets set between modern day Valencia and the Spanish Civil War.

Guided by a series of letters and a key bequeathed to her, Emma Temple leaves London to restore an old abandoned villa in Valencia, Spain. For her grandmother, this house evokes terrible memories of Spain's civil war. As the house gives up its secrets, Emma is drawn into a story of lost love and families ripped apart by war.

High in the hills of Valencia, a forgotten house guards its secrets. Untouched since Franco's forces tore through Spain in 1936, the whitewashed walls have crumbled, the garden, laden with orange blossom, grown wild. Emma Temple is the first to unlock its doors in seventy years. Guided by a series of letters and a key bequeathed in her mother's will, she has left her job as London's leading perfumier to restore this dilapidated villa to its former glory. It is the perfect retreat: a wilderness redolent with strange and exotic scents, heavy with the colours and sounds of a foreign time. But for her grandmother, Freya, a British nurse who stayed here during Spain's devastating civil war, Emma's new home evokes terrible memories. As the house begins to give up its secrets, Emma is drawn deeper into Freya's story: a story of crushed idealism, of lost love, and of families ripped apart by war. She soon realises it is one thing letting go of the past, but another when it won't let go of you.

Kotui multi-version record.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

Booklist Review

Soon after her mother's untimely death, perfumer Emma Temple's fiancé and business partner leaves her for another woman. Pregnant with her first child, Emma leaves England for a run-down house in Valencia, Spain, to regroup. The house was purchased by her mother during the last days of her life, and Emma isn't sure why. As she gets to know the locals, she discovers that this small, close-knit community holds the key to secrets that force Emma to question her identity, but they also provide her with a means to recover from her life's tragic turns. British writer Brown's U.S. debut makes good use of multiple time periods, alternating between Emma's life in 2001 and her grandmother Freya and great-uncle Charles' experiences during the Spanish Civil War. This provides a context for the secret of Emma's ancestry, allowing the reader to understand why her grandparents made such difficult decisions during the war. At its core, this is a love story celebrating both romantic and parental love, a tale that fans of romantic women's fiction will enjoy.--Donohue, Nanette Copyright 2015 Booklist

Kirkus Book Review

The multigenerational story of a family unfolds amid the tumult of the Spanish Civil War and the emotional devastation wrought by 9/11 in this second novel from British author Brown (The Beauty Chorus, 2011).When world-renowned perfumer Liberty Temple dies of cancer, she leaves behind a chest of letters for her daughter, Emma, along with the key to a villa in Spain, mysteriously purchased right before her death. Emma is still grieving the loss of her mother when her lover, Joe, is lost in the World Trade Center attacksand that blow, combined with the fact that she's carrying Joe's baby and the impending sale of the perfume company she built with her mother, is enough to send her off to find the ruined villa in search of a new life. Woven clunkily into the backdrop of Emma's story are the tales of Freya, her grandmother, and her great-uncle Charlestwo young idealists from England who joined the fight against Gen. Franco's fascist takeover of Spain in 1936. In a series of scenes that feel more like vignettes, characters are thrust together only long enough to accomplish the author's agenda, making up their minds and then changing them, often without authentic motivation, their dialogue as tinned as the rations they likely ate. Violence, scent, sensuality, and the lush but devastated countryside of Spain make welcome appearances, but the transparency of Brown's characters is too hard to overlook. Some guile and finesse might have gone a long way in helping the characters come more fully to life, but without it, this novel feels like too much effort for insufficient reward. While the premise of Brown's book certainly has roots in an emotional past, this novel unfortunately fails to take flight. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.