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The Alpine traitor [text (large print)] / Mary Daheim.

By: Daheim, Mary.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Thorndike Press large print mystery.Daheim, Mary. Emma Lord mystery: 20.; Daheim, Mary. Emma Lord mystery: Publisher: Waterville, Me. : Thorndike Press, c2008Description: 495 pages (large print ) ; 23 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781410407542 (lg. print : hardcover : alk. paper); 1410407543; 9781408412152 (UK : hbk.); 1408412152 (UK : hbk.); 1408412160 (UK : pbk.); 9781408412169 (UK : pbk.).Subject(s): Lord, Emma (Fictitious character) -- Fiction | Newspaper publishing -- Fiction | Consolidation and merger of corporations -- Fiction | Women publishers -- Fiction | Large type books | Newspaper publishing -- Mergers -- Fiction | Women journalists -- Fiction | Washington (State) -- FictionGenre/Form: Romance fiction. | Detective and mystery fiction. | Mystery -- Fiction. | Large type books.DDC classification: 813/.54
Contents:
"An Emma Lord mystery" -When Alpine's newspaper, "The Advocate, " narrowly escapes a potential hostile takeover, Emma Lord finds herself on the top of the suspect list when the person behind the bid turns up dead.
Summary: When Alpine's newspaper, "The Advocate, " narrowly escapes a potential hostile takeover, Emma Lord finds herself on the top of the suspect list when the person behind the bid turns up dead.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due
Large Print Davis (Central) Library
Large Print
Large Print DAH 1 Checked out 17/12/2019

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

After Emma Lords newspaper becomes the victim of a hostile takeover, the person behind the acquisition winds up dead--and Emma is the prime suspect. It turns out that the victim was not only after Emmas business, he was a front man for the heirs of her longtime lover, Tom Cavanaugh.

"An Emma Lord mystery"

"An Emma Lord mystery" -When Alpine's newspaper, "The Advocate, " narrowly escapes a potential hostile takeover, Emma Lord finds herself on the top of the suspect list when the person behind the bid turns up dead.

When Alpine's newspaper, "The Advocate, " narrowly escapes a potential hostile takeover, Emma Lord finds herself on the top of the suspect list when the person behind the bid turns up dead.

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Excerpt provided by Syndetics

Chapter One A beautiful blonde with a figure that Venus de Milo would've envied walked into my office, sat down on the other side of my desk, crossed her long legs, removed her big, expensive sunglasses, and offered an appealing smile. "I need your help," she said. "I'm in big trouble." "What kind of trouble?" I asked. She ran her tongue over her full, crimson lips. "It's tricky," she said, her voice dropping a notch. "I don't know where to turn." A lilting laugh broke out somewhere in her skimpy red tee's deep cleavage. "You'll probably think I'm an idiot." Had I been a macho private eye with a gun under my jacket and a fifth of Scotch in the drawer, I might have told her she was this idiot's delight. But since I'm also female, the come-hither act flopped. Indeed, at that moment, I was a middle-aged mother and newspaper publisher in a small town with egg salad on my lower lip. I grabbed the paper napkin from the Grocery Basket's deli and wiped my mouth. "Sorry," I apologized, the words covering various flaws, including the egg salad, my lack of a flattering response, and not knowing my visitor's name. "We haven't met." "Oh!" She laughed in a disarming manner. "I'm Ginger Roth. My husband, Josh, and I just moved to Alpine. I love the setting here, with all the mountains and trees. I'm from Phoenix." "This is quite a change for you," I remarked, resisting the urge to gobble a couple of potato chips and cursing my staff for abandoning The Alpine Advocate office during lunch hour. "How can I help you?" "Well." This time Ginger's smile was self-deprecating. "A friend of mine asked me to talk to you about your newspaper." "Okay," I said. "How does that get you in trouble?" She grew serious. "My friend's getting an M.A. at the University of Arizona in Tucson. She's focusing her thesis on weekly newspapers, so when she found out Josh and I were moving to Alpine, she asked me to talk to the local publisher." Ginger grimaced. "I don't know zip about journalism, so I haven't a clue how to go about it." "Your friend didn't give you a list of questions or topics?" Ginger shook her head, the golden, shoulder-length strands glinting in the afternoon light. "She told me to get an introduction first, and see if you'd be willing to cooperate." I shrugged. "No problem. Find out the specifics, and then we can set up a time to talk about whatever she wants to know. Is she planning to go into the print media when she finishes her degree?" "I'm not sure," Ginger replied, her green eyes roaming around the low-ceilinged room. "She worked in an art gallery before going to grad school." "Newspapers are dinosaurs," I pointed out. "Major metropolitan dailies are losing circulation hand over fist. In some ways, small town papers are more viable because they're so localized. I struggle to make ends meet, but owning a newspaper that serves around six thousand readers is better than going out of business in a big city." "Wow." Ginger didn't sound terribly interested. In fact, she looked bored. "I'll pass that along," she said vaguely, handing me a slip of paper with her cell phone number. "I'd better go. I'll let you know when I've got those questions." She smiled again, not quite so delightfully, and sashayed out of my office, through the newsroom, and, presumably, onto Front Street. I took another bite of my sandwich. Two minutes later, my House & Home editor, Vida Runkel, tromped into the newsroom and made a beeline to my office cubbyhole. "Who was that blond girl?" she demanded. "I've never seen her before." " Excerpted from The Alpine Traitor by Mary Daheim All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Publishers Weekly Review

Murder and mayhem once again rock the placid town of Alpine, Wash., in Daheim's 20th cozy to feature newspaper publisher Emma Lord (after 2007's The Alpine Scandal). When the two grown children of Emma's deceased long-ago lover, Tom Cavanaugh, offer to buy her paper, the Advocate, Emma refuses. Soon after leaving for Seattle for the weekend, Emma gets a phone call from Sheriff Milo Dodge, who tells her the driving force behind the attempted takeover, Tom's daughter's husband, Dylan Platte, has been murdered. A suspect herself, Emma joins Milo in the search for Dylan's killer. Not until violence strikes again, this time close to home, can Emma put the pieces together and come to terms with Tom, his family and her own painful past. An intriguing plot and the usual cast of lovable characters make this another winner. (Feb. 26) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Booklist Review

In this twentieth installment in the long-running series, small-town newspaper owner Emma Lord must deal with a buyout attempt from her former fiancé's children as well as train an inept reporter in how to write for her weekly paper. When one of the would-be purchasers is murdered, Emma becomes a suspect and begins her own investigation, which prompts memories of her own fiancé, who left her pregnant and alone years ago. Emma is a likable, principled, caring character and an engaging narrator, and her account of the trials of running a small newspaper provides a fascinating frame.--O'Brien, Sue Copyright 2008 Booklist