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Do I have a daddy? : a story about a single-parent child with a special section for single mothers and fathers / written by Jeanne Warren Lindsay ; illustrated by Jami Moffett.

By: Lindsay, Jeanne Warren, 1929-.
Contributor(s): Moffett, Jami, 1952-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Buena Park, Calif. : Morning Glory Press, c2000Edition: Revised edition.Description: 47 pages : color illustrations ; 23 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 1885356625 (hc).Subject(s): Children of single parents -- Pictorial works -- Juvenile fiction | Paternal deprivation -- Pictorial works -- Juvenile fiction | Single-parent families -- Pictorial works -- Juvenile fiction | Unmarried mothers -- Pictorial works -- Juvenile fiction | Mothers and sons -- Pictorial works -- Juvenile fiction | Paternal deprivation -- Juvenile literature | Children of single parents -- Juvenile literature | Single-parent families -- Juvenile literatureGenre/Form: Children's nonfiction. | Picture booksSummary: A single mother explains to her son that his daddy left soon after he was born. Includes a section with suggestions for answering the question, "Do I have a daddy?"
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due
Childrens Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Children's Non-fiction
Children's Non-fiction 306.8 LIN 3 Available
Childrens Non-Fiction Mobile Library
Children's Non-fiction
Children's Non-fiction 306.8 LIN 1 Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Ages 3 to 8 years. Thousands of children are forced to grow up without their fathers. This book helps kids with absent, deceased, and unknown dads talk about and deal with this difficult situation. In the story, Erik, a preschooler, is teased by other children about not having a dad. His mother explains that there are many kinds of fathers, and not all of them live with their children. The story serves as a conversation starter and can be adapted to meet a childs specific needs. Parents learn the importance of being honest while allowing their children to retain a positive view of the absent parent.

A single mother explains to her son that his daddy left soon after he was born. Includes a section with suggestions for answering the question, "Do I have a daddy?"

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1-While playing house, Erik is prompted by a questioning friend to ask his mother if he has a daddy. She tells him that he had a daddy in the beginning but that he left. She further explains that some parents get married and take care of their children together, but that she and Erik's father never married because they were so young. Erik's mother emphasizes how much she wanted him and how excited his daddy was when he was born. The story ends with the boy's mother reminding him of the important role his uncle and grandfather play in his life. The text is written in a positive and nurturing manner, and lets children know that there are many different types of family situations. An informative section for single parents on ways they can deal with this issue follows the story. The illustrations are somewhat stiff and amateurish, but do an adequate job of visualizing the text for young children. This book should have a place in libraries, counselors' offices, and social workers' collections.-Susan Knell, Pittsburg State University, Pittsburg, KS (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Booklist Review

Ages 4^-7. When Erik is taunted by his friend about not having a father, he goes home and confronts his mother: "Where's my daddy?" She answers his difficult question and others by explaining that there are different kinds of daddies, and Erik's was too young to take on the responsibilities of marriage. She reassures him that she will always be there for him and urges him to spend time with his uncle and grandpa who love him. Following the story is a section devoted to single parents, which, although seemingly geared toward less-experienced single parents, provides good tips for any single parent handling similar questions and emphasizes the importance of being honest and positive. The book will be useful in presenting the concept of single-parent families to a wide audience. --Helen Rosenberg

Horn Book Review

Erik questions his mother about his father and why he doesn't live with them. Straightforward conversation between Erik and his mother addresses the concerns typical of very young children in a single-parent household, while a ten-page section at the back provides additional advice for parents. Although the book may be useful, the story and art are stiff and bland. From HORN BOOK Fall 2000, (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.