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Impounded : Dorothea Lange and the censored images of Japanese American internment / Dorothea Lange ; edited by Linda Gordon and Gary Y. Okihiro.

By: Lange, Dorothea.
Contributor(s): Gordon, Linda | Okihiro, Gary Y, 1945-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York, N.Y. : W.W. Norton, c2006Description: [ix], 205 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 039306073X (hbk.); 9780393060737 (hbk.).Other title: Dorothea Lange and the censored images of Japanese American internment | Dorothea Lange & the censored images of Japanese American internment.Subject(s): Japanese Americans -- Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945 -- Pictorial works | World War, 1939-1945 -- Japanese Americans -- Pictorial works | Censorship -- United StatesDDC classification: 940.53089
Contents:
Dorothea Lange photographs the Japanese American internment / Linda Gordon -- An American story / Gary Y. Okihiro -- Photographs: Before the evacuation -- The roundup -- At the assembly centers -- Manzanar -- Acknowledgments --Bibliography.
Dorothea Lange photographs the Japanese American internment / Linda Gordon -- An American story / Gary Y. Okihiro -- Photographs -- Before the evacuation -- The roundup -- At the assembly centers -- Manzanar.
Summary: Censored by the U.S. Army, Dorothea Lange's unseen photographs are the photographic record of the Japanese American internment saga. This indelible work of visual and social history confirms Dorothea Lange's stature as one of the twentieth century's greatest American photographers. Presenting 119 images--the majority of which have never been published--this book evokes the horror of a community uprooted in the early 1940s and the stark reality of the internment camps. Nationally known historians Linda Gordon and Gary Okihiro narrate the saga of Japanese American internment: from life before Executive Order 9066 to the abrupt roundups and the marginal existence in the bleak, sandswept camps.--From publisher description.Review: "In the devastating aftermath of December 7, 1941, with America reeling from imperial Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor, political leaders and media outlets throughout the country turned their anger inward, branding all Americans of Japanese ancestry as dangerous potential spies and saboteurs. Government, military, and journalistic spokesmen ratcheted up a racist fever against Japanese Americans." "Dorothea Lange (1895-1965), the noted documentary photographer, was one of a handful of white people impelled to speak out. Already a prominent photographer in the employ of the WPA, she was hired by the U.S. War Relocation Authority to photograph the process of the imprisonment of 110,000 Japanese Americans. Once she had secured her role as witness, she devoted herself to the project, working seven days a week throughout the first half of 1942." "Impounded tells the historic story of internment from the perspective of the internees. There were no charges or even allegations of disloyalty to the United States against the internees, of whom two-thirds were American citizens. Nevertheless they were detained without trial or even hearings, incarcerated in desolate locations, and housed in rough, cramped barracks surrounded by barbed wire."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction
Non-Fiction 940.5308 LAN 1 Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

This indelible work of visual and social history confirms Dorothea Lange's stature as one of the twentieth century's greatest American photographers. Presenting 119 images originally censored by the U.S. Army--the majority of which have never been published--Impounded evokes the horror of a community uprooted in the early 1940s and the stark reality of the internment camps. With poignancy and sage insight, nationally known historians Linda Gordon and Gary Okihiro illuminate the saga of Japanese American internment: from life before Executive Order 9066 to the abrupt roundups and the marginal existence in the bleak, sandswept camps. In the tradition of Roman Vishniac's A Vanished World, Impounded, with the immediacy of its photographs, tells the story of the thousands of lives unalterably shattered by racial hatred brought on by the passions of war.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 201-203).

Includes bibliographical references.

Dorothea Lange photographs the Japanese American internment / Linda Gordon -- An American story / Gary Y. Okihiro -- Photographs: Before the evacuation -- The roundup -- At the assembly centers -- Manzanar -- Acknowledgments --Bibliography.

Dorothea Lange photographs the Japanese American internment / Linda Gordon -- An American story / Gary Y. Okihiro -- Photographs -- Ch. 1. Before the evacuation -- Ch. 2. The roundup -- Ch. 3. At the assembly centers -- Ch. 4. Manzanar.

Censored by the U.S. Army, Dorothea Lange's unseen photographs are the photographic record of the Japanese American internment saga. This indelible work of visual and social history confirms Dorothea Lange's stature as one of the twentieth century's greatest American photographers. Presenting 119 images--the majority of which have never been published--this book evokes the horror of a community uprooted in the early 1940s and the stark reality of the internment camps. Nationally known historians Linda Gordon and Gary Okihiro narrate the saga of Japanese American internment: from life before Executive Order 9066 to the abrupt roundups and the marginal existence in the bleak, sandswept camps.--From publisher description.

"In the devastating aftermath of December 7, 1941, with America reeling from imperial Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor, political leaders and media outlets throughout the country turned their anger inward, branding all Americans of Japanese ancestry as dangerous potential spies and saboteurs. Government, military, and journalistic spokesmen ratcheted up a racist fever against Japanese Americans." "Dorothea Lange (1895-1965), the noted documentary photographer, was one of a handful of white people impelled to speak out. Already a prominent photographer in the employ of the WPA, she was hired by the U.S. War Relocation Authority to photograph the process of the imprisonment of 110,000 Japanese Americans. Once she had secured her role as witness, she devoted herself to the project, working seven days a week throughout the first half of 1942." "Impounded tells the historic story of internment from the perspective of the internees. There were no charges or even allegations of disloyalty to the United States against the internees, of whom two-thirds were American citizens. Nevertheless they were detained without trial or even hearings, incarcerated in desolate locations, and housed in rough, cramped barracks surrounded by barbed wire."--BOOK JACKET.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

Publishers Weekly Review

When America's War Relocation Authority hired Dorothea Lange to photograph the internment of Japanese-Americans in 1942, they put a few restrictions on her work. Barbed wire, watchtowers and armed soldiers were off limits, they declared. And no pictures of resistance, either. They wanted the roundup and sequestering of Japanese-Americans documented-but not too well. Working within these limits, Lange, who is best known for her photographs of migrant farmers during the Depression, nonetheless produced images whose content so opposed the federal objective of demonizing Japanese-Americans that the vast majority of the photographs were suppressed throughout WWII (97% of them have never been published at all). Editors Gordon and Okihiro set this first collection of Lange's internment work within technical, cultural and historical contexts. Gordon (The Great Arizona Orphan Abduction) discusses Lange's professional methods and the formation of her "democratic-populist" beliefs. Okihiro (Whispered Silences: Japanese Americans and World War II) traces the history of prejudice against Japanese Americans, with emphasis on internees' firsthand accounts. But the bulk of the book is given over to Lange's photographs. Several of these are as powerful as her most stirring work, and the final image-of a grandfather in the desolate Manzanar Center looking down in anguish at the grandson between his knees-is worth the price of the book alone. 104 photos, 2 maps. (Nov.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved