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We danced all night : a social history of Britain between the wars / Martin Pugh.

By: Pugh, Martin.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London : Bodley Head, 2008Description: xii, 495 pages, [16] pages of plates : illustrations ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780224076982 (hbk.); 0224076981 :.Subject(s): Great Britain -- Social conditions -- 20th century | Great Britain -- History -- George V, 1910-1936 | Great Britain -- History -- George VI, 1936-1952DDC classification: 941.083
Contents:
'Will never really came home': The Impact of the Great War -- 'A Babylonian touch': British Food Between the Wars -- 'Mr Can and Mr Can't': Health and Medicine -- 'Where the air's like wine': The Origins of the Property-Owning Democracy -- Wigan Pier Revisited: Work, Unemployment and Class Conflict -- Screwneck Webb and Jimmy Spinks: Crime, Violence and the Police -- 'The Best Job of All': Marriage and Divorce -- 'Abnormalities of the brain': Sex, Sexuality and Gender Confusion -- 'Keep Young and Beautiful': Women, Domesticity and Feminism -- 'The mills were our destiny': Childhood, Youth and Education -- 'Reminiscent of Negro orgies': Leisure Between the Wars -- Yellow Earl and Silver Ghost: Motoring and Interwar Society -- 'Cider With Rosie': The Countryside Between the Wars -- 'Six penn'orth of hope': Sport and Gambling -- 'Wings over Everest': The Romance and the Menace of Aviation -- 'A talent to amuse': British Cultural Life -- 'Brideshead Revisited': The Decline of the Aristocracy -- 'Everybody calls him Bertie': The Monarchy and the British People -- A Stone's Throw to Australia': Patriotism, Race and Empire -- 'No longer part of England': Regions and Nations in Interwar Britain -- 'Ask Your Father': From War to War.
Review: "Bounded by the Great War on one side and by the looming shadow of the Second World War on the other, the interwar era boasts a coherent identity enjoyed by few other twenty-year periods. Martin Pugh vividly shows how the British people reacted to the privations of wartime by indulging in leisure and entertainment activities of all kinds - from dancing and cinema-going to smoking, football pools and paid holidays. He assesses the dramatic impact of novelties such as the 'wireless', aviation and motoring on lives and attitudes. And he corrects the view of those contemporary critics who saw British society as undisciplined, irresponsible and criminal: in those decades the great Victorian vices - prostitution and drunkenness - were in fact in steep decline, while the prison population stood at just 11,000."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction
Non-Fiction 941.083 PUG 1 Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Martin Pugh offers a uniquely untraditional view of Britain's inter-war period; that among the many dramatic social changes taking place, our modern consumer society of dedicated shoppers effectively took shape during the 1930s.

Includes index.

1. 'Will never really came home': The Impact of the Great War -- 2. 'A Babylonian touch': British Food Between the Wars -- 3. 'Mr Can and Mr Can't': Health and Medicine -- 4. 'Where the air's like wine': The Origins of the Property-Owning Democracy -- 5. Wigan Pier Revisited: Work, Unemployment and Class Conflict -- 6. Screwneck Webb and Jimmy Spinks: Crime, Violence and the Police -- 7. 'The Best Job of All': Marriage and Divorce -- 8. 'Abnormalities of the brain': Sex, Sexuality and Gender Confusion -- 9. 'Keep Young and Beautiful': Women, Domesticity and Feminism -- 10. 'The mills were our destiny': Childhood, Youth and Education -- 11. 'Reminiscent of Negro orgies': Leisure Between the Wars -- 12. Yellow Earl and Silver Ghost: Motoring and Interwar Society -- 13. 'Cider With Rosie': The Countryside Between the Wars -- 14. 'Six penn'orth of hope': Sport and Gambling -- 15. 'Wings over Everest': The Romance and the Menace of Aviation -- 16. 'A talent to amuse': British Cultural Life -- 17. 'Brideshead Revisited': The Decline of the Aristocracy -- 18. 'Everybody calls him Bertie': The Monarchy and the British People -- 19. A Stone's Throw to Australia': Patriotism, Race and Empire -- 20. 'No longer part of England': Regions and Nations in Interwar Britain -- 21. 'Ask Your Father': From War to War.

"Bounded by the Great War on one side and by the looming shadow of the Second World War on the other, the interwar era boasts a coherent identity enjoyed by few other twenty-year periods. Martin Pugh vividly shows how the British people reacted to the privations of wartime by indulging in leisure and entertainment activities of all kinds - from dancing and cinema-going to smoking, football pools and paid holidays. He assesses the dramatic impact of novelties such as the 'wireless', aviation and motoring on lives and attitudes. And he corrects the view of those contemporary critics who saw British society as undisciplined, irresponsible and criminal: in those decades the great Victorian vices - prostitution and drunkenness - were in fact in steep decline, while the prison population stood at just 11,000."--BOOK JACKET.

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