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Fatal terrain / Dale Brown.

By: Brown, Dale, 1956-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Patrick McLanahan: 6.Publisher: London : HarperCollins, c1997Description: xiii, 448 pages ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0002254522; 0006498477 (pbk.).Subject(s): United States. Air Force -- Fiction | Thriller -- Fiction | Air pilots -- Fiction | Air forces | United States -- Military relations -- China -- Fiction | China -- Military relations -- United States -- FictionGenre/Form: Action and adventure fiction.DDC classification: [Fic]
Contents:
Firm sale (Print on Demand or Special Order title) -Paperback -State-of-the-art action in the air, on land and at sea as the USA is drawn into conflict with China in this compelling and authentic new tale from an acclaimed master of the modern action-thriller. Dale Brown's spectacular new international bestseller -- packed with high-action entertainment, cutting-edge technology and breathtaking scenes of aerial combat -- looks forward to a near future where Taiwan's declaration of independence from mainland China brings a very real threat of major conflict to the Pacific. As China prepares its military response, the US president attempts to avert an international crisis by calling on his own tried and trusted secret strike force. But soon it becomes horribly apparent that with China and the USA moving ever closer to a nuclear showdown, it could be a mission too far for Patrick McLanahan, Brad Elliott, Jon Masters and their high-tech EB-52 Megafortress -- the 'Old Dog' itself.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

State-of-the-art action in the air, on land and at sea as the USA is drawn into conflict with China in this spectacular new novel from an acclaimed master of the modern action-thriller. 'When a former pilot with years of experience turns his hand to writing thrillers you can take their authenticity for granted. His writing is exceptional and the dialogue, plots and characters are first-class... far too good to be missed.' Sunday Mirror Admired for their authenticity and breathtaking scenes of aerial combat, Dale Brown's bestselling thrillers - which include the classic Flight of the Old Dog and, most recently, Shadows of Steel - offer high-action entertainment, cutting-edge technology and insights into the world of international power politics to match the very best of Tom Clancy, Stephen Coonts and Larry Bond. In Fatal Terrain, which takes place shortly after the events of Shadows of Steel, Taiwan's formal declaration of independence from mainland China brings the threat of major conflict to the Pacific. As China prepares to send an invasion force into Taiwan, the US president once again calls on his own tried and trusted secret strike force... But it may be the final mission for Patrick McLanahan, Brad Elliott, Jon Masters and their high-tech EB-52 Megafortress - the 'Old Dog' itself.

Firm sale (Print on Demand or Special Order title) -Paperback -State-of-the-art action in the air, on land and at sea as the USA is drawn into conflict with China in this compelling and authentic new tale from an acclaimed master of the modern action-thriller. Dale Brown's spectacular new international bestseller -- packed with high-action entertainment, cutting-edge technology and breathtaking scenes of aerial combat -- looks forward to a near future where Taiwan's declaration of independence from mainland China brings a very real threat of major conflict to the Pacific. As China prepares its military response, the US president attempts to avert an international crisis by calling on his own tried and trusted secret strike force. But soon it becomes horribly apparent that with China and the USA moving ever closer to a nuclear showdown, it could be a mission too far for Patrick McLanahan, Brad Elliott, Jon Masters and their high-tech EB-52 Megafortress -- the 'Old Dog' itself.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

In this all-too-predictable tale, a reconfigured B-52 bomber and its doughty crew try to prevent a war between Taiwan and the People's Republic of China. Dastardly politicians and greedy military careerists attempt to thwart our friends in the skies, but, aided by hawkish President Martindale, strike-warfare expert Patrick McLanahan and his buddies put their prototype aircraft through its paces while flirting with their own capture or destruction. Unfortunately, Brown here fails to live up to the thought-provoking substance of his previous books, notably Shadows of Steel (LJ 6/15/96). The major characters from those earlier works reappear (accompanied by turgid recapitulations of past escapes) and seize the opportunity to weigh in on the side of the good guys. Despite battle scenes and lots of shouted dialog, the pace is leaden and the characterizations dull. Only for comprehensive Brown or aviation-fiction collections. [Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 2/1/97.]‘Elsa Pendleton, Boeing Information Svcs., Inc., China Lake, Cal. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly Review

" `It's nothing you haven't done before, General,' McLanahan said. `I know you've gone over the Mach at one hundred AGL in the B-1B, and you've shook off fighters in a B-52 down low before, too.' " Readers whose pulse rises at sentences like that will find that Brown's (Storming Heaven) latest hymn to airborne death and destruction will get their engines up to full rev. Laden with acronyms like COMNAVAIRPAC and CINCPAC, full of stiffly worded patriotism ("And thank you for what you and Tiger Jamieson did over Iran and the Persian Gulf. You averted a major world oil crisis, and probably another Desert Storm. Job well done"), the narrative nevertheless manages to jet through a complex story involving a Chinese plot to retake Taiwan. Crippled by huge budget cuts, the Air Force looks hopeless in the face of this aggression‘until a secret, private fleet of Megafortresses comes to the rescue. As usual, Brown's encyclopedic knowledge of everything military (and his boyish delight in putting it all down on paper) go a long way toward excusing his tinny dialogue and leaden prose. (June) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Booklist Review

The Old Dog (an airplane, as Brown regulars know) learns yet more new tricks in Brown's latest technothriller. The EB-52 Megafortresses (improved descendants of the Old Dog) are about to be scrapped, the rest of the U.S. heavy bomber force radically downsized. Then the Chinese seriously try to conquer Taiwan, and President Martindale wants to defend it equally seriously, despite U.S. military weakness, interservice rivalry, and political opposition. Led by Brad Elliott and Patrick McLanahan, the reunited Old Dog crew flies one official mission against the Chinese--and then is faced with arrest for exceeding orders. The next mission--unofficial--becomes justly compared with the exploits of the Flying Tigers of World War II and precipitates a decisive U.S. bomber counteroffensive that defeats the Chinese. Longer on well-handled action and hardware than on characterization (virtually all the navy personnel in it are caricatures), the yarn is another consistent page-turner from Brown, anyway, and won't disappoint his numerous readers. --Roland Green

Kirkus Book Review

Retired USAF Colonel Patrick McLanahan and his band of irregulars help turn the tide when the People's Republic of China makes war on its lost province of Taiwan, in another high adventure from past master Brown (Shadows of Steel, 1996, etc.). On the eve of Hong Kong's return to China, the nationalists on Taiwan unexpectedly announce their complete independence from the mainland and are immediately recognized by Kevin Martindale, the US President. Taipei's declaration enrages Beijing's hardline Communists, and the Red regime dispatches a carrier force to patrol the Formosa Straits. A heavily armed EB-52 Megafortress on a test flight with a civilian crew under McLanahan's command becomes involved in the resultant confrontation. Initially, the American bomber (extensively modified by McLanahan's employer to carry advanced weaponry) tips the balance, but China's vessels launch nuclear-tipped missiles that wipe out the nationalist warships. On the home front, political adversaries in Congress and business interests (concerned about their commercial stakes in China) put intense pressure on Martindale to let Taiwan go by the boards; the turf-conscious American military also presses the White House to take the McLanahan crew (over which they have minimal control) out of the increasingly deadly game. But under the crafty direction of Admiral Sun Ji Guoming (an ardent patriot bent on returning Taiwan to the mainland fold), hostilities escalate and US forces sustain severe losses. Ordered to stand down in the wake of a tragic mistake, McLanahan's experimental aircraft escapes to Guam (before that island is obliterated by China's missiles) and fights on the side of the nationalists in a climactic battle that effectively finishes off Sun's vaulting ambitions. Nobody, in detailing the lethal excitements of high-tech aerial combat in at least plausible geopolitical contexts, does it better than Brown.