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The image always has the last word : on contemporary New Zealand painting and photography / Laurence Simmons.

By: Simmons, Laurence, 1950-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Palmerston North, N.Z. : Dunmore Press, 2002Description: 195 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 30 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0864694121 (pbk.) :.Subject(s): Painting, New Zealand -- 21st century | Painters -- New Zealand | Painting, New Zealand -- 20th century | Painting, New ZealandDDC classification: 759.993
Partial contents:
Rita Angus -- Tracing the self -- The haunting of painting -- Colin McCahon -- McCahon's myth -- 'after Titian' -- The enunciation of the Annunciation -- McCahon's glass -- Gordon Walters -- Time, series and signature -- Milan Mrkusich -- Mrkusich's maculae -- Richard Killeen -- Painting communities -- 'Language is not neutral' -- Photography -- 'Looking back' -- The image always has the last word.
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Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction
Non-Fiction 759.993 SIM 1 Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

This book examines in detail the work of seven major twentieth-century New Zealand painters and photographers: Rita Angus, Colin McCahon, Gordon Walters, Milan Mrkusich, Richard Killeen, Les Cleveland and Megan Jenkinson. While it contains some historical and contextual background, it is not an art history in the traditional sense. Rather, it applies a broad range of critical theories and methodologies to sustained close readings of paintings and photographic images, in an attempt to explore a cluster of related concepts: subjectivity, sociality, self-reflexive representation, feminism, time, the gaze and the frame. It is also a complex attempt to explore the complex relationship between words and images and therefore to begin the answer the question of how we might write about painting and the visual. To achieve this it deliberately employs a number of different performative strategies or 'manners' of writing in order to unseat the belief that discourse on painting simply 'relates' an image by speaking it.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 183-190) and index.

Rita Angus -- Tracing the self -- The haunting of painting -- Colin McCahon -- McCahon's myth -- 'after Titian' -- The enunciation of the Annunciation -- McCahon's glass -- Gordon Walters -- Time, series and signature -- Milan Mrkusich -- Mrkusich's maculae -- Richard Killeen -- Painting communities -- 'Language is not neutral' -- Photography -- 'Looking back' -- The image always has the last word.

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