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Bella Poldark : a novel of Cornwall, 1818-1820 / Winston Graham.

By: Graham, Winston.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Poldark: 12.; Graham, Winston: 12Publisher: London : Pan, 2008, c2002Description: xiii, 688 pages ; 20 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780330463317.Subject(s): Poldark, Ross (Fictitious character) -- Fiction | Cornwall (England : County) -- FictionGenre/Form: Historical fiction.Summary: The final instalment in the much-loved Poldark saga. Cornwall, 1818: We continue the tale of Ross and Demelza; of the wayward Valentine Warleggan, whose existence keeps open the old wounds of the feud between Ross and George; of Bella, the Poldark's youngest daughter, whose precocious talent as a singer is encouraged by her old flame, Christopher Havergal, and by a distinguished French conductor, who has more in mind than Bella's music; of Clowance, the Poldark's widowed daughter, who considers remarriage to one of two rival suitors; and of a murderer who stalks the villages of west Cornwall.
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Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Fiction Collection
Fiction Collection GRA 1 Checked out 26/04/2020

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Cornwall 1818. We continue the tale of Ross and Demelza; of the wayward Valentine Warleggan, whose existence keeps open the old wounds of the feud between Ross and George; of Bella, the Poldark's youngest daughter, whose precocious talent as a singer is encouraged by her old flame, Christopher Havergal, and by a distinguished French conductor, who has more in mind than Bella's music; of Clowance, the Poldark's widowed daughter, who considers remarriage to one of two rival suitors; and of a murderer who stalks the villages of west Cornwall. 'From the very first lines we tingle with the sense that we are in good hands, transported by Graham's atmospheric prose back to 1818 and the treacherous coast of craggy Cornwall' Daily Mail

First published: London : Macmillan, 2002.

The final instalment in the much-loved Poldark saga. Cornwall, 1818: We continue the tale of Ross and Demelza; of the wayward Valentine Warleggan, whose existence keeps open the old wounds of the feud between Ross and George; of Bella, the Poldark's youngest daughter, whose precocious talent as a singer is encouraged by her old flame, Christopher Havergal, and by a distinguished French conductor, who has more in mind than Bella's music; of Clowance, the Poldark's widowed daughter, who considers remarriage to one of two rival suitors; and of a murderer who stalks the villages of west Cornwall.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

In the 12th and final novel of Graham's acclaimed series, which debuted in 1945, the Poldark and Warleggan families continue to feud and try to deal with personal losses and social unrest after the Napoleonic wars. (Earlier "Poldark" books were made into a popular Masterpiece Theater series in the 1970s.) As the story opens, Valentine Warleggan's paternity still poisons the atmosphere, and his financial and marital troubles form a major narrative strand set firmly against the saga's familiar background of Cornwall. Meanwhile, Bella Poldark's desire for a musical career takes her to stages in London and France, where she is involved with rival suitors. Her widowed older sister, Clowance, must also choose between two men of vastly different backgrounds who propose marriage. A host of other characters and subplots, including a series of murders, keeps the action bubbling. Graham surmounts the daunting challenge of reminding readers of major events and characters from previous Poldark novels. Still, even devoted fans of the books or the BBC series may require a refresher. Public libraries with earlier volumes will want to complete their set, but the novel's ties to its predecessors reduce its interest as a stand-alone novel.-Kathy Piehl, Minnesota State Univ. Lib., Mankato(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.