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Cardington Crescent : a Charlotte and Thomas Pitt novel / Anne Perry.

By: Perry, Anne.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Perry, Anne. Charlotte and Thomas Pitt novel: 8.Publisher: New York, N.Y. : Ballantine Books, 2011Description: 312 pages ; 21 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780345514073 (pbk.); 0345514076 (pbk.).Subject(s): Pitt, Charlotte (Fictitious character) -- Fiction | Pitt, Thomas (Fictitious character) -- Fiction | Women detectives -- England -- London -- Fiction | Police -- England -- London -- Fiction | Police spouses -- Fiction | London (England) -- FictionGenre/Form: Detective and mystery fiction. | Historical fiction.DDC classification: [Fic] Subject: When the womanizing aristocrat George March is found dead over his morning coffee, the immediate concern of his shocked Cardington Crescent household is quieting the scandal as discreetly - and quickly - as possible. Unfortunately for March's wife, Emily, that means accusing her of the murder. But the family does not take into account Emily's beloved sister, who is none other than the indomitable Charlotte Pitt. Together, Charlotte and her husband, police inspector Thomas Pitt, take on the seemingly irreproachable, upper-crust March clan and uncover an insidious web of corruption and depravity that leads them from the elegant Crescent town house to the hideous London slums, and from genteel society to murder - again.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

When the womanizing aristocrat George March is found dead over his morning coffee, the immediate concern of his shocked Cardington Crescent household is quieting the scandal as discreetly--and quickly--as possible. Unfortunately for March's wife, Emily, that means accusing her of the murder. But the family does not take into account Emily's beloved sister, who is none other than the indomitable Charlotte Pitt. Together, Charlotte and her husband, police inspector Thomas Pitt, take on the seemingly irreproachable, upper-crust March clan and uncover an insidious web of corruption and depravity that leads them from the elegant Crescent town house to the hideous London slums, and from genteel society to murder--again.

Originally published: St. Martin's Press, 1987.

Includes an excerpt from Treason at Lisson Cover p. [299]-312.

When the womanizing aristocrat George March is found dead over his morning coffee, the immediate concern of his shocked Cardington Crescent household is quieting the scandal as discreetly - and quickly - as possible. Unfortunately for March's wife, Emily, that means accusing her of the murder. But the family does not take into account Emily's beloved sister, who is none other than the indomitable Charlotte Pitt. Together, Charlotte and her husband, police inspector Thomas Pitt, take on the seemingly irreproachable, upper-crust March clan and uncover an insidious web of corruption and depravity that leads them from the elegant Crescent town house to the hideous London slums, and from genteel society to murder - again.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Perry's latest Thomas Pitt mystery takes the listener back to Victorian England. She details the clothes, homes, d?cor, and decorum of both the high class and those who served them. As the story opens, Thomas is called in when neatly tied parcels containing human body parts are discovered. Meanwhile, at Cardington Crescent, the mansion where Thomas's sister-in-law Emily is visiting, another murder takes place. Thomas's wife, Charlotte, is summoned to the mansion to help care for her sister, for it is Emily's husband, George, who is killed. Perry describes the differences between London's "best society" and the poor in vivid detail. She paints a bleak picture of an age when enlightened people had no concern for the working class. Not quite the cozy cottage mystery, this book, narrated by Davina Porter, is really a period piece that spends as much time setting the stage as it does resolving the crimes. Recommended for public libraries with a Perry collection.-Theresa Connors, Arkansas Tech Univ., Russellville (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly Review

Perry's Victorian sleuths Inspector Thomas Pitt and his redoubtable wife Charlotte returnafter Death in the Devil's Acre and Bluegate Fieldsto poke holes in the stiff fabric of London's high society. While Thomas works on a case involving a murdered woman whose body has been dismembered and left in packages around the city, Charlotte's brother-in-law George is poisoned at the home of his cousin's family on Cardington Crescent. George had been suffering an infatuation for his cousin's wife Sybilla, and the family would like to squelch the suggestion of scandal by leaving the crime unsolved, allowing their circle to believe the poison was administered by his wife Emily Charlotte's sister in a fit of jealousy. Charlotte arrives at Cardington Crescent to clear Emily's name and while she's there, Sybilla is also murdered, strangled with her own long, lovely hair. Thomas and Charlotte work at the mysteries, each cutting through layers of class structure to arrive at the same sordid point, where incest and child neglect intersect. Perry brings the era to life not just by period detail, but with sure-handed characterization and compelling, timeless plot. (March 22) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Booklist Review

Victoriana abounds in Perry's eighth historical mystery featuring the stalwart Inspector Thomas Pitt of Scotland Yard and his inquisitive wife, Charlotte. When Charlotte's beloved sister is suspected of poisoning her philandering husband, the Pitts undertake the investigation of the unfortunate victim's seemingly irreproachable, upper-crust family. Amid the luxurious splendor of an elegant town house and the hideous squalor of a London slum, they uncover a scandalous web of depravity and corruption that has inevitably culminated in the murder. A detailed period puzzler suffused with atmosphere, emotion, and suspense. MF. [OCLC] 86-27942

Kirkus Book Review

Another of the author's Victorian tales involving plebian Inspector Pitt and his aristocratic, sleuthing wife Charlotte (Rutland Place, etc.) in a case close to home. Charlotte's brother-in-law George, husband of sister Emily, has been poisoned in the Cardington Crescent mansion of Uncle Eustace March, where he and Emily were staying for the London ""season."" Lusty, bombastic, widowed Eustace, his grim mother; rebellious daughter Tassie; fragile painter son William, and beautiful daughter-in-law Sybilla were all in residence, along with feisty Aunt Vespasia and handsome, well-connected, unmonied Jack Hadley, a suitor for Tassie. They were all aware of George's ardent affair with Sybilla, which seemed to be ending just before his death. Now Charlotte moves in to comfort Emily and, after a second murder, provides husband Thomas with a crucial lead that ties in with a previous, unrelated killing and eventually pinpoints George's murderer. Perry gives a vivid, if sometimes tract-like, picture of Victorian London and the appalling contrasts between its haves and have-nots, but there are too many soporific pages of the sister's vapors and speculations. In this story, anyway, less would have been much more. Copyright ┬ęKirkus Reviews, used with permission.