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Still life : inside the Antarctic huts of Scott and Shackleton / photography by Jane Ussher ; essays by Nigel Watson.

By: Ussher, Jane, 1953-.
Contributor(s): Watson, Nigel | Watson, Nigel | Antarctica Heritage Trust (N.Z.).
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Sydney, N.S.W. : Murdoch Books, 2010Copyright date: ©2010Description: 223 pages (some fold out) : colour illustrations, photographs ; 33 cm.Content type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781741967395 (hbk.); 1741967392 (hbk.).Other title: Inside the Antarctic huts of Scott and Shackleton.Subject(s): Scott, Robert Falcon, 1868-1912 | Shackleton, Ernest Henry, Sir, 1874-1922 | British Antarctic Expedition (1907-1909) -- Pictorial works | British Antarctic ("Terra Nova") Expedition (1910-1913) -- Pictorial works | Photography -- New Zealand | Photographers -- New Zealand | Huts -- Antarctic regions -- Ross Island (Ross Sea) -- Pictorial works | Historic buildings -- Antarctic regions -- Ross Island (Ross Sea) -- Pictorial works | Photography -- Antarctic regions -- Ross Island (Ross Sea) | Ross Island (Ross Sea, Antarctica) -- Buildings, structures, etc. -- Pictorial works | Antarctica -- Discovery and exploration -- British -- Pictorial worksDDC classification: 779 Awards: New Zealand Post Book Awards 2011 Illustrated Non-Fiction Finalist.Summary: "Still life" is a unique and hauntingly beautiful photographic study of the Antarctic huts that served as expedition bases for explorations led by Captain Robert Falcon Scott and Sir Ernest Shackleton. At the turn of the twentieth century Antarctica was the focus of one of the last great races of exploration and discovery. Known as the 'heroic age', from 1895 to 1917 Antarctic explorers set off from their huts in search of adventure, science and glory but some, such as Scott, were never to return. The World Wars intervened and the huts were left as time capsules of Edwardian life; a portrait of King Edward VII hangs amid seal blubber, sides of mutton, a jar of gherkins, penguin eggs, cufflinks and darned trousers. One of New Zealand's best known photographers, Jane Ussher, was invited by the Antarctic Heritage Trust to record 'the unusual, the hidden and minutiae of these sites'. The Executive Director of the Trust, Nigel Watson, provides a fascinating introduction to the history and atmosphere of each hut and detailed photographic captions. Key points: features Discovery Hut (used by both Scott and Shackleton), Shackleton's Hut and Scott's Hut on Ross Island in McMurdo Sound; unique and intimate glimpse into the lives of Antarctic explorers, a subject that holds great fascination for readers worldwide; large format and seven gatefolds display Jane Ussher's intriguing and evocative photography with stunning impact.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

A magnificent, hauntingly beautiful photographic study of the Antarctic huts that served as expedition bases for explorations led by Captain Robert Falcon Scott and Sir Ernest Shackleton   At the turn of the 20th century Antarctic explorers set off from their huts in search of adventure, science, and glory, while the huts were left as time capsules of Edwardian life. The huts had never been the subject of a thorough photographic survey until Jane Ussher was invited by the Antarctic Heritage Trust to record "the unusual, the hidden and minutiae of these sites," and this tome is the stunning result. Seven gatefolds reveal wide-format photos, while intimate close-ups explore the fascinating details in each small, gritty corner of the huts. A portrait of King Edward VII hangs amid seal blubber, sides of mutton, a jar of gherkins, penguin eggs, cufflinks, and darned trousers. The executive director of the Trust provides a fascinating introduction to the history and atmosphere of each hut and detailed photographic captions. Diary excerpts from the explorers bring their time in the huts to life, while a final chapter discusses the current work to conserve the huts.

"Still life" is a unique and hauntingly beautiful photographic study of the Antarctic huts that served as expedition bases for explorations led by Captain Robert Falcon Scott and Sir Ernest Shackleton. At the turn of the twentieth century Antarctica was the focus of one of the last great races of exploration and discovery. Known as the 'heroic age', from 1895 to 1917 Antarctic explorers set off from their huts in search of adventure, science and glory but some, such as Scott, were never to return. The World Wars intervened and the huts were left as time capsules of Edwardian life; a portrait of King Edward VII hangs amid seal blubber, sides of mutton, a jar of gherkins, penguin eggs, cufflinks and darned trousers. One of New Zealand's best known photographers, Jane Ussher, was invited by the Antarctic Heritage Trust to record 'the unusual, the hidden and minutiae of these sites'. The Executive Director of the Trust, Nigel Watson, provides a fascinating introduction to the history and atmosphere of each hut and detailed photographic captions. Key points: features Discovery Hut (used by both Scott and Shackleton), Shackleton's Hut and Scott's Hut on Ross Island in McMurdo Sound; unique and intimate glimpse into the lives of Antarctic explorers, a subject that holds great fascination for readers worldwide; large format and seven gatefolds display Jane Ussher's intriguing and evocative photography with stunning impact.

New Zealand Post Book Awards 2011 Illustrated Non-Fiction Finalist.

New Zealand Post Book Awards 2011 - Finalist (Illustrated Non-Fiction)

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

Publishers Weekly Review

In 2008, Ussher, a New Zealand photographer, photographed the famous Scott and Shackleton huts, which have survived intact in the Antarctic climate for a century. From her opening shot of the imposing frozen tundra and the memorials to those who died on the expeditions, the majestic but treacherous terrain seems to spread to infinity, rendering these huts blips on an unforgiving landscape. Featuring mostly interior shots of the explorers' shelters, these photos reveal an elegant British formality despite the austerity of daily life. Ussher, former chief photographer for the New Zealand Listener, portrays the interiors and remains in haunting but artful shots of intact food tins, crates, even animal carcasses. Certain images prove especially rich: light catching the edge of a tape measure, the stitching on a man's boot, writing paraphernalia from Paris-all shot in extreme close-ups with a delicate eye. Watson, executive director of the Antarctic Heritage Trust, provides detailed descriptions of each hut, the men, and their expeditions, as well as diary excerpts and comprehensive captions. (July) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.