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The golden city / John Twelve Hawks.

By: Twelve Hawks, John.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Twelve Hawks, John. Fourth realm trilogy: 3.; Twelve Hawks, John. Fourth realm trilogy: bk. 3.Publisher: London : Bantam, 2010Description: 358 pages ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780593054918 (hbk.); 0593054911 (hbk.).Subject(s): Brothers -- Fiction | Supernatural -- FictionGenre/Form: Thrillers (Fiction)DDC classification: 813.6 Subject: A world that exists in the shadow of our own ...John Twelve Hawks' previous novels about the mystical Travellers and the Brethren, their ruthless enemies, generated an extraordinary following around the world. In "The Golden City", Twelve Hawks delivers the climax to his spellbinding epic. Struggling to protect the legacy of his Traveller father, Gabriel faces troubling new questions and relentless threats. His brother Michael, now firmly allied with the enemy, pursues his ambition to wrest power from Nathan Boone, the calculating leader of the Brethren. And Maya, the Harlequin warrior pledged to protect Gabriel at all costs, is forced to make a choice that will change her life forever.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due
Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Fiction Collection
Fiction Collection HAW 1 Checked out 16/10/2020

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Since childhood Gabriel and Michael Corrigan were told by their father Matthew that the world they live in is engaged in a constant struggle between good and evil. Matthew has since disappeared and both his sons find themselves on different sides in a fight for the future of humanity.

A world that exists in the shadow of our own ...John Twelve Hawks' previous novels about the mystical Travellers and the Brethren, their ruthless enemies, generated an extraordinary following around the world. In "The Golden City", Twelve Hawks delivers the climax to his spellbinding epic. Struggling to protect the legacy of his Traveller father, Gabriel faces troubling new questions and relentless threats. His brother Michael, now firmly allied with the enemy, pursues his ambition to wrest power from Nathan Boone, the calculating leader of the Brethren. And Maya, the Harlequin warrior pledged to protect Gabriel at all costs, is forced to make a choice that will change her life forever.

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Sequel to: The dark river.

Excerpt provided by Syndetics

1 Early in the evening, a North Sea storm swept through the German countryside and drenched Berlin. Raindrops rattled on the glass panes of the greenhouse and the orangery in Babelsberg Park. The willow trees around the lake swayed back and forth like underwater plants while a flock of ducks huddled together on their little island. In the streets around Potsdamer Platz, the traffic was slow and halting, the cream-colored taxicabs honking at one another in the clogged intersections while delivery trucks grumbled like large shambling creatures. Windshields were streaked with water and it was difficult to see the faces of the drivers. The sidewalks in the Mitte district were empty, and it seemed as if much of Berlin's population had disappeared. But the surveillance cameras remained like mute guardians of the city. They tracked a young woman holding a newspaper over her head as she darted from an office doorway to a waiting car. They followed a restaurant deliveryman as he pedaled a bicycle up the street, a life revealed in a series of grainy black-and-white images: a desperate face with wet hair plastered to the forehead, legs moving frantically while a cheap plastic poncho flapped in the wind. On Friedrichstrasse, a license-plate scanner mounted on a building photographed a black Mercedes stopped at a traffic light. The plate number was recorded and automatically checked against a central database as Michael Corrigan and Mrs. Brewster sat in the backseat and waited for the light to turn green. Mrs. Brewster had taken a tube of lipstick out of her purse and was studying her face in a compact mirror. This was behavior quite out of character for the current head of the Brethren's executive board; unless there was a party or some other kind of special event, Mrs. Brewster paid minimal attention to her personal appearance. She was a tweed-and-practical-shoes sort of woman, whose only gesture to vanity was the artificial color of her chestnut-brown hair. "God, I look tired," she announced. "It's going to take an effort to get through dinner with Hazelton and his friends." "If you want, I'll do all the talking." "That would be wonderful, Michael. But it's not necessary. There's been a change of plans." With exaggerated decisiveness, Mrs. Brewster snapped the mirror shut and dropped it into her purse, then slipped on a pair of sunglasses. The dark glasses covered her eyes and upper cheekbones like a half mask. "Terry Dawson just sent me an e-mail from the research center in New York," she said. "They've finished building the new version of the quantum computer, and Dawson has been testing the system. I want you to be there tomorrow afternoon when the computer becomes fully operational." "Perhaps they could postpone everything for a few days so I could attend the executive board meeting." "The Crossover Project is a good deal more important than any meeting. The original version of this computer put us in contact with an advanced civilization that began to supply us with technical data. Dr. Dawson wants you to be there if the civilization contacts us again." The Mercedes turned another corner. Michael stared at Mrs. Brewster for a few seconds, but the sunglasses and the dim light made it difficult to know what she was thinking. Was she telling him the truth, or was this just a strategy to separate him from the rest of the Brethren? Her mouth and neck showed some tension, but there was nothing unusual about that. "I think it would be easier if we interviewed Dawson with a video conference camera," Michael said. "I want a full assessment of the project, and you can only do that if you're at the laboratory. Your clothes are packed and waiting at the hotel. A chartered jet is fueling at Schanefeld Airport." "We've been meeting people for the last three days . . ." "Yes. I know. Everything is rather frantic. But the quantum computer has a Excerpted from The Golden City by John Twelve Hawks All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

The battle between brothers Michael and Gabriel Corrigan comes to a head in this final "Fourth Realm" trilogy installment (after The Traveler and The Dark River). The brothers are the last of the Travelers, a line of prophets with the ability to travel to parallel universes. Michael continues to cooperate with the Tabula, a group of wealthy international elite in pursuit of world domination. He travels to the fifth realm, where ultimate control of the population is instilled through fear. Upon his return, Michael begins to take control of the Tabula to start his own worldwide campaign of fear. Gabriel has been gathering his own forces, known as Free Runners, individuals who have noticed the growth in invasive technologies that curtail true freedom. With their lives constantly in danger from the Tabula, Gabriel, his friend Hollis, and Harlequin bodyguards Maya and Linden must find a way to thwart Michael's plans. VERDICT Twelve Hawks is able skillfully to expand further on his characters and keep the rapid pace for a satisfying conclusion to this technological fantasy-thriller amalgamation. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 6/1/09.]-Joy Gunn, Henderson Libs., NV (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly Review

The final volume in Hawks's fantasy thriller series, the Fourth Realm trilogy, brings to an end the struggle between the forces of evil, the Brethren-run empire known as the Tabula, and those of good-the Travelers, Harlequins and other fighters of the Resistance. The first book, The Traveler, promised, and delivered, much; the second, The Dark River, was bleak and a bit of a disappointment. With the third, Hawks has returned, somewhat, to the excitement of the first, though those expecting a final, titanic battle to decide the fate of the world will come away frustrated. In the end, the action scenes are too few and too brief, and the explorations into the other Realms don't come to much of anything. Some fans might wish the author had spent less time on the easy-to-understand philosophical underpinnings (e.g., "freedom is the essence of our lives-not surveillance and control") and more time on swinging swords. Newcomers should read the series in order. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Booklist Review

Twelve Hawks' Fourth Realm trilogy, which began with The Traveler (2005) and continued with The Dark River (2007), concludes. The author has several threads to tie up: the fate of Maya, the Harlequin presently trapped in an alternate realm; the struggle of Gabriel, Maya's lover, to find her and to ensure that his evil brother, Michael, doesn't take over the world; the struggle of Michael to manipulate certain technologies for his own evil purposes. Twelve Hawks, who has kept his own identity a secret, is a highly imaginative writer, and he likes to get right to the meat of the story, which is good, if you like to play catch-up as you're reading. If you're the type who likes things clearly explained at the outset (What's a Harlequin? What's a Traveler?), you might feel a bit confused. The first two novels in this trilogy were stunningly imaginative and innovative; this one is, too, but the burden of the first two books weighs heavily on both author and reader. Twelve Hawks must bow here to the more mundane needs of plot resolution, and readers not thoroughly familiar with the earlier books may lose themselves trying to keep things straight. For devotees, however, this is a satisfying and very entertaining wrap-up, though it lacks the bravura flourishes of its predecessors.--Pitt, David Copyright 2009 Booklist

Kirkus Book Review

Less-than-rip-roaring final installment in Twelve Hawks' Fourth Realm trilogy (The Traveler, 2005, etc.). Brothers Gabriel and Michael are Travelers, mystics who have the ability to journey between parallel dimensions, or realms. They find themselves aligned with opposite sides in the conflict between the Brethren, a shadowy group bent on acquiring and maintaining power, and those who work to thwart the Brethren's nefarious plan to establish a global surveillance network known as the Panopticon, designed to squash any and all efforts at resistance. Michael, the brother who works for the bad guys, is given a lesson in Machiavellian tactics by the Half Gods, a group of technologically advanced beings who have established Orwellian control over the Fifth Realm, and he returns to our dimension to consolidate his power. Meanwhile, gentle Gabriel travels to the hellish First Realm to rescue his beloved Maya, a member of the Harlequin warrior sect, dour fighters dedicated to protecting Travelers from the Brethren. After cementing his position as a leader of the Brethren and the Evergreen Foundation (their public face), Michael sets a plan in motion to increase his organization's power by generating terror in the populace. He hires a psychopath to kidnap children, thus increasing calls for greater surveillance, while Gabriel engineers a bold play to inform the world at large about the shady deeds perpetrated by the Evergreen Foundation. Despite the fact that this trilogy revolves around a high-stakes and often violent struggle between the forces of good and evil, it is oddly boring. Only a few well-wrought action sequences may hold the reader's strained interest; the decidedly half baked inter-dimensional travel cosmology and bland New Age-y philosophizing will not. Tepid and vague. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.