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Ask that mountain : the story of Parihaka / Dick Scott.

By: Scott, Dick, 1923- [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Auckland, N.Z. : Raupo, 2008, 1975Edition: 1981 edition.Description: 216 pages : illustrations, portraits, map, facsimiles ; 20 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780143010869 (pbk.); 0143010867.Subject(s): Te Whiti-o-Rongomai, -1907 | Tohu Kākahi, 1828-1907 | Maori (New Zealand people) -- Government relations | Maori (New Zealand people) -- New Zealand -- South Taranaki District -- History | Maori (New Zealand people) -- History | Kōrero nehe | Kāwanatanga | Whenua raupatu | Pakanga | Tino rangatiratanga | Tōrangapū | Parihaka Pa (N.Z.) -- History | South Taranaki District (N.Z.) -- History | New Zealand -- History -- 1876-1918DDC classification: 993.488
Contents:
Fire and sword -- Village of peace -- Smoothing the pillow -- Challenge of the ploughmen -- Battle of the fences -- Rising storm -- Smite the shepherd, scatter his flock -- Prison and exile -- Pass laws and pilgrimages -- The liberal embrace -- Preposterous ghosts -- Portraits of Te Whiti -- Taranaki drink trade -- Hiroki's last letter.
Parihaka has become a byword for Maori refusal to yield land, culture and dignity to New Zealand's colonial government. Well after the end of the New Zealand Wars, the people of this small settlement at the foot of Mt Taranaki held out against the encroachments of Pakeha settlers in a struggle that swapped the weapons of war for the weapons of peace. Taking as their symbol the white feather, the chiefs Te Whiti and Tohu led Parihaka in one of the world's first-recorded campaigns of passive resistance. Maori ploughmen wrote its message across the settlers' pastures, and Maori fencers underlined the point by throwing barriers across the queen's highways. Withstanding repeated military action, the spirit of resistance born at Parihaka kept alive the flame of that supposedly 'dying race', the Maori. Ask That Mountain draws on official papers, settler manuscripts and oral history to give the first complete account of what took place at Parihaka. Now in its ninth edition, this seminal work was in 1995 named by the Sunday Star-Times as one of the ten most important books published in New Zealand.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Parihaka has become a byword for Maori refusal to yield land, culture and dignity to New Zealand's colonial government. Well after the end of the New Zealand Wars, the people of this small settlement at the foot of Mt Taranaki held out against the encroachments of Pakeha settlers in a struggle that swapped the weapons of war for the weapons of peace.

Taking as their symbol the white feather, the chiefs Te Whiti and Tohu led Parihaka in one of the world's first-recorded campaigns of passive resistance. Maori ploughmen wrote its message across the settlers' pastures, and Maori fencers underlined the point by throwing barriers across the queen's highways. Withstanding repeated military action, the spirit of resistance born at Parihaka kept alive the flame of that supposedly 'dying race', the Maori.
Ask That Mountain draws on official papers, settler manuscripts and oral history to give the first complete account of what took place at Parihaka. Now in its ninth edition, this seminal work was in 1995 named by the Sunday Star-Times as one of the ten most important books published in New Zealand.

Originally published: Auckland, N.Z. : Southern Cross/Reed, c1975.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 211-213) and index.

Fire and sword -- Village of peace -- Smoothing the pillow -- Challenge of the ploughmen -- Battle of the fences -- Rising storm -- Smite the shepherd, scatter his flock -- Prison and exile -- Pass laws and pilgrimages -- The liberal embrace -- Preposterous ghosts -- Portraits of Te Whiti -- Taranaki drink trade -- Hiroki's last letter.

Parihaka has become a byword for Maori refusal to yield land, culture and dignity to New Zealand's colonial government. Well after the end of the New Zealand Wars, the people of this small settlement at the foot of Mt Taranaki held out against the encroachments of Pakeha settlers in a struggle that swapped the weapons of war for the weapons of peace. Taking as their symbol the white feather, the chiefs Te Whiti and Tohu led Parihaka in one of the world's first-recorded campaigns of passive resistance. Maori ploughmen wrote its message across the settlers' pastures, and Maori fencers underlined the point by throwing barriers across the queen's highways. Withstanding repeated military action, the spirit of resistance born at Parihaka kept alive the flame of that supposedly 'dying race', the Maori. Ask That Mountain draws on official papers, settler manuscripts and oral history to give the first complete account of what took place at Parihaka. Now in its ninth edition, this seminal work was in 1995 named by the Sunday Star-Times as one of the ten most important books published in New Zealand.

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