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Have you seen Mr. Robinson? / by Arwen Huang.

By: Huang, Arwen [author.].
Material type: TextTextPublisher: [Place of publication not identified] : Starfish Bay Children's Books, 2019Description: 1 volume (unpaged) : colour illustrations ; 23 x 26 cm.Content type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781760360818.Other title: Have you seen Mister Robinson?.Subject(s): Friendship in children -- Juvenile fiction | Books and reading -- Juvenile fiction | Lost articles -- Juvenile fiction | Cats -- Juvenile fiction | Loneliness in children | Loneliness -- Juvenile fiction | Bashfulness in childrenGenre/Form: Fiction. | Juvenile works. | Children's stories -- Pictorial works.Summary: Anna is a shy, bibliophile, book loving girl whose only friends are the characters in her books, but when Grandpa suggests she go outside to play, Anna has trouble talking to the other children. That is until she meets a boy who wants to find a cat named Mr. Robinson. A sweet story about a friendship between two reserved children.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Childrens Picture Books Aramoho Community Library
Children's Picture Books
Children's Picture Books HUAN Available T00837006
Childrens Picture Books Davis (Central) Library
Children's Picture Books
Children's Picture Books HUAN Available T00837005
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

A shy, book-loving girl has troubling making friends until she meets a boy who is looking for the local park's cat.

Anna is a shy, bibliophile, book loving girl whose only friends are the characters in her books, but when Grandpa suggests she go outside to play, Anna has trouble talking to the other children. That is until she meets a boy who wants to find a cat named Mr. Robinson. A sweet story about a friendship between two reserved children.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Publishers Weekly Review

"Anna loves reading books," Huang begins. "She reads a lot. A lot more than you or I." True to form, bespectacled, brown-haired Anna sits perched on a pile of books with a blue volume cracked open on her lap. She has trouble connecting with her peers but finds sufficing companionship in book characters. When her librarian grandfather suggests she enjoy herself outside, Anna takes herself to the park and again finds it difficult to make friends, until a child asks her to help him find Mr. Robinson, the local park cat. They search their town high and low, and their collaboration hints at a human friendship to come. Huang's text doesn't paint Anna with much depth, and the message about finding friends seems inconsistent with the book's initial suggestion that Anna is content with book-character companions; still, illustrations in a pleasing, autumnal palette add richness to this story about stepping out of one's comfort zone. Ages 5--7. (Sept.)

Kirkus Book Review

A solitary bookworm makes a friend.Anna's a reader. She "doesn't have any real' friends," the book explains alongside art that depicts her standing in line at the bus stop, nose in a book, and then by herself, still reading, at a classroom table as her classmates play all around her. "But she doesn't mind, because she has many friends in her books," it goes on, depicting her sitting on a unicorn and surrounded by characters both familiar (Little Red Riding Hood, a lute-bearing nymph, some animals) and less so. Among the latter are William Shakespeare, whom adults may recognize but children are unlikely to; a robed white man who leans on a globe (Ren Descartes??); and a gray-haired, Asian-presenting cellist who is probably not Yo-Yo Ma. Children must shake off this obscurity to proceed. Anna's librarian grandfather sends her into the park to play. This does not go well until a boy named Jeff approaches her with the titular question. Mr. Robinson is his lost cat. "He's big, fluffy, and cute." The two kids proceed through town, climbing a tower from which Anna spots the cat, who "is not as cute as Anna had imagined." And that's pretty much it. Exactly what Huang is getting at in this story is unclear beyond a general feeling that it's good for children to vary reading with interaction with other kids. Both Anna and Jeff present white.Baffling. (Picture book. 4-7) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.