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Polynesian Island myths / general editor: Jake Jackson ; associate editor: Taylor Bentley.

Contributor(s): Jackson, Jake [editor.] | Bentley, Taylor [editor.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: Worlds greatest myths and legends.Publisher: London, England : Flame Tree Publishing, 2020Description: 252 pages : illustrations (black and white) ; 21 cm.Content type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 1839642246; 9781839642241.Subject(s): Mythology, Polynesian | Pūrākau | Atua | MāuiDDC classification: 398.209931
Contents:
Introduction to Polynesian myths -- Tales of creation -- Tales of Maui -- Tales of Hina -- Tales of Gods -- Tales of ghosts and the underworld -- Glossary of Māori words.
Summary: The rich and fascinating myths of Polynesia are all the more extraordinary for the fact that they have survived thousands of years - and miles - of voyages. Scattered across the pacific, the Polynesian islands were populated over generations, as waves of people emigrated from on island to the next, leaping into the unknown with each journey. With each migration, their stories travelled with them. Figures such as the goddess Hina and Maui, the trickster demi-god, are a unifying thread in the sprawling oral history of the Polynesian people. Yet these stories also highlight the rich diversity among these island nations, with each developing its own distance culture and oral tradition.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Te Taurawhiri Non-Fiction Alexander Library | Te Rerenga Mai o Te Kauru
Te Taurawhiri
Te Taurawhiri 398.2 POL Available T00836765
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction (NEST)
Non-Fiction (NEST) 398.2 POL Available T00832231
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

The Polynesian triangle covers Easter Island, Hawaii, New Zealand and the many isles in between. The legends of the region are based on the creation of land, fish, sea, valleys and the volcanic outcrops scattered across the long stretches of the Pacific.<br> <br> The beautiful myths of the ancient Polynesians are brought together in this new collection: from Hawaii the Rainbow Maiden of Manoa undulates through the valleys and rainbow mists; the creator Maui releases his fish hooks into the sea to raise the islands to the surface; and tales of Pele the Fire Goddess, who hurls fountains of molten rock into the air creating vast flows of lava. From the Maori of New Zealand come the strange fruit of darkness, the tales of Tiki and the Great Mother from whom the gods descend, then humankind. And from Polynesia, more legends of Maui creating the ancestors, and Hina the moon goddess. Such myth-making joy creates a rare unity in diversity as the ancient Polynesians strove to explain the beauty and darkness of their lush ocean worlds, now offered in this new selection of myths and legends.<br> <br> FLAME TREE 451 : From myth to mystery, the supernatural to horror, fantasy and science fiction, Flame Tree 451 offers a healthy diet of werewolves and mechanical men, blood-lusty vampires, dastardly villains, mad scientists, secret worlds, lost civilizations and escapist fantasies. Discover a storehouse of tales gathered specifically for the reader of the fantastic.

Introduction to Polynesian myths -- Tales of creation -- Tales of Maui -- Tales of Hina -- Tales of Gods -- Tales of ghosts and the underworld -- Glossary of Māori words.

The rich and fascinating myths of Polynesia are all the more extraordinary for the fact that they have survived thousands of years - and miles - of voyages. Scattered across the pacific, the Polynesian islands were populated over generations, as waves of people emigrated from on island to the next, leaping into the unknown with each journey. With each migration, their stories travelled with them. Figures such as the goddess Hina and Maui, the trickster demi-god, are a unifying thread in the sprawling oral history of the Polynesian people. Yet these stories also highlight the rich diversity among these island nations, with each developing its own distance culture and oral tradition.