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Dinner with Edward : a story of an unexpected friendship / Isabel Vincent.

By: Vincent, Isabel, 1965-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: London, England : Pushkin Press, 2019Copyright date: ©2016Description: 223 pages ; 20 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781911590187 (paperback).Subject(s): Vincent, Isabel, 1965- -- Friends and associates | Women authors, American -- Anecdotes | Friendship -- Psychological aspects | Self-actualization (Psychology) | Dinners and dining -- New York (State) -- New York | New York (N.Y.) -- AnecdotesGenre/Form: Autobiographies. DDC classification: 158.1092 Summary: With its delicious food, warm jazz, and stunning views of Manhattan, Edward's home was a much-needed refuge for reporter Isabel Vincent. Her recently widowed ninety-something neighbour would prepare weekly meals for her, dinners Isabel would never cook for herself - fresh oysters, juicy steak, sugar-dusted apple galette. But over long, dark evenings where they both grieved for their very different lost marriages, Isabel realised she was being offered a gift greater than crisp martinis and perfect lamb chops. As they progressed from meals a deux to full dinner parties with an eclectic New York crowd, she saw that Edward was showing her how to rediscover the joy of life. For even a shared bowl of chowder could transform loneliness and anxiety into friendship, freedom, and a pure, simple pleasure Isabel had not known she could find again.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Biographies Davis (Central) Library
Biographies
Biographies B VIN Available T00823409
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

A charming, tender and life-affirming memoir of a journalist's unlikely bond with a 93-year-old widower.

With its delicious food, warm jazz, and stunning views of Manhattan, Edward's home was a much-needed refuge for reporter Isabel Vincent. Her recently widowed ninety-something neighbour would prepare weekly meals for her, dinners Isabel would never cook for herself - fresh oysters, juicy steak, sugar-dusted apple galette. But over long, dark evenings where they both grieved for their very different lost marriages, Isabel realised she was being offered a gift greater than crisp martinis and perfect lamb chops. As they progressed from meals a deux to full dinner parties with an eclectic New York crowd, she saw that Edward was showing her how to rediscover the joy of life. For even a shared bowl of chowder could transform loneliness and anxiety into friendship, freedom, and a pure, simple pleasure Isabel had not known she could find again.