Whanganuilibrary.com
Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Necropolis / Boris Pahor ; translated by Michael Biggins ; introduced by Alan Yentob.

By: Pahor, Boris [author.].
Contributor(s): Biggins, Michael [translator.] | Yentob, Alan [writer of introduction.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Canons (Canongate Books Ltd.): Publisher: Edinburgh : Canongate, 2020Copyright date: �1995Description: xix, 172 pages ; 20 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781838852290; 1838852298.Uniform titles: Nekropola. English. Subject(s): Pahor, Boris | World War, 1939-1945 -- Prisoners and prisons, German | Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945) | World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, Slovenian | Pahor, Boris | Jewish Holocaust (1939-1945) | World War (1939-1945) | 1939-1945Genre/Form: Personal narratives -- Slovenian.DDC classification: 940.5318092 Summary: Boris Pahor spent the last fourteen months of World War II as a prisoner and medic in the Nazi camps at Bergen-Belsen, Harzungen, Dachau and Natzweiler-Struthof. Twenty years later, as he visited the preserved remains of a camp, his experiences came back to him: the emaciated prisoners; the ragged, zebra-striped uniforms; the infirmary reeking of dysentery and death. Necropolis is Pahor's stirring account of providing medical aid to prisoners in the face of the utter brutality of the camps and coming to terms with the guilt of surviving when millions did not. It is a classic account of the Holocaust and a powerful act of remembrance.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction
Non-Fiction 940.5318092 Coming Soon

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

A classic of Holocaust literature from the camps' oldest known survivor; introduced by Alan Yentob

Originally published in Slovenian as Nekropola by Zalozba Obzorja Maribor, 1967.

Boris Pahor spent the last fourteen months of World War II as a prisoner and medic in the Nazi camps at Bergen-Belsen, Harzungen, Dachau and Natzweiler-Struthof. Twenty years later, as he visited the preserved remains of a camp, his experiences came back to him: the emaciated prisoners; the ragged, zebra-striped uniforms; the infirmary reeking of dysentery and death. Necropolis is Pahor's stirring account of providing medical aid to prisoners in the face of the utter brutality of the camps and coming to terms with the guilt of surviving when millions did not. It is a classic account of the Holocaust and a powerful act of remembrance.

Translated from the Slovenian.