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The madness of crowds : gender, race and identity / Douglas Murray.

By: Murray, Douglas, 1979-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London, England : Bloomsbury Continuum, 2019Copyright date: ©2019Description: 280 pages ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781635579987; 1635579988; 9781472959973; 1472959973.Subject(s): Freedom of speech | Censorship | Internet -- Political aspects | Social media -- Political aspects | Online social networks -- Political aspects | Political correctness | Social movements | Collective behaviorDDC classification: 323.443 Summary: In the long-awaited follow-up to his 2016 best-seller The Strange Death of Europe, Douglas Murray interrogates the vicious new culture wars playing out in our media, universities, homes and perhaps the most violent place of all: online. The Madness of Crowds is a must-read polemic-a vociferous demand for a return to free speech in an age of mass hysteria and political correctness. The global conversations around sexuality, race, mental health and gender are heavily policed by the loud and frequently anonymous voices on social media and in the press. Once conceived as forums for open speech, social media and online networks have emboldened the mob and exacerbated groupthink-self-censorship and public shaming have become rife. As a result, Murray argues, we have become paralyzed by the fear of being criticized and have unlearned the ability to speak frankly about some of the most important issues affecting society. Murray walks against the tide of censorship. He asks us to think more openly about what we're afraid to say; to think outside of the mob and the psychology of the crowd.
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Non-Fiction (NEST) 323.443 MUR Coming Soon

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

The challenging and brilliantly-argued new book from the bestselling author of The Strange Death of Europe.

In his devastating new book The Madness of Crowds , Douglas Murray examines the twenty-first century's most divisive issues: sexuality, gender, technology and race. He reveals the astonishing new culture wars playing out in our workplaces, universities, schools and homes in the names of social justice, identity politics and intersectionality.

We are living through a postmodern era in which the grand narratives of religion and political ideology have collapsed. In their place have emerged a crusading desire to right perceived wrongs and a weaponization of identity, both accelerated by the new forms of social and news media. Narrow sets of interests now dominate the agenda as society becomes more and more tribal--and, as Murray shows, the casualties are mounting.

Readers of all political persuasions cannot afford to ignore Murray's masterfully argued and fiercely provocative book, in which he seeks to inject some sense into the discussion around this generation's most complicated issues. He ends with an impassioned call for free speech, shared common values and sanity in an age of mass hysteria.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 258-272) and index.

In the long-awaited follow-up to his 2016 best-seller The Strange Death of Europe, Douglas Murray interrogates the vicious new culture wars playing out in our media, universities, homes and perhaps the most violent place of all: online. The Madness of Crowds is a must-read polemic-a vociferous demand for a return to free speech in an age of mass hysteria and political correctness. The global conversations around sexuality, race, mental health and gender are heavily policed by the loud and frequently anonymous voices on social media and in the press. Once conceived as forums for open speech, social media and online networks have emboldened the mob and exacerbated groupthink-self-censorship and public shaming have become rife. As a result, Murray argues, we have become paralyzed by the fear of being criticized and have unlearned the ability to speak frankly about some of the most important issues affecting society. Murray walks against the tide of censorship. He asks us to think more openly about what we're afraid to say; to think outside of the mob and the psychology of the crowd.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Introduction (p. 1)
  • 1 Gay (p. 11)
  • Interlude - The Marxist Foundations (p. 51)
  • 2 Women (p. 64)
  • Interlude - The Impact of Tech (p. 107)
  • 3 Race (p. 121)
  • Interlude - On Forgiveness (p. 174)
  • 4 Trans (p. 184)
  • Conclusion (p. 231)
  • Acknowledgements (p. 257)
  • Notes (p. 258)
  • Index (p. 273)

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In this bold and timely work, Murray (a prolific political columnist and debater based in the UK) exposes the madness in current social justice movements and the power of that madness in public discourse. Murray is no reactionary: he celebrates the extension of rights to women, the GLBTQ population, and racial minorities. He is a modern liberal who is satisfied with recent gains in equality. What bewilders and troubles him is the unrelenting push for more--for going from what he frames as equal to better. He criticizes the new and dense minefields of public discourse, which prevent critical, complex thought and self-reflection. Innocent comments can send one begging for mercy before the crowd. After documenting the excesses, contradictions, and unforgiving nastiness of these movements, he concludes that this madness is an instrument for a project of destruction, both societal and personal. Murray's account suggests the beginnings of a sort of Orwellian dystopia, one led by tech giants, hysterical college students, weak college administrators and faculty, and the Twitterati. Following Hannah Arendt, Murray advocates the rediscovery of forgiveness. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All readers. --Stephen Wolfe, Louisiana State University