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Tooth and veil : the life and times of the New Zealand dental nurse / Noel O'Hare.

By: O'Hare Noel.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Auckland, New Zealand : Massey University Press, 2020Description: 254 pages : colour illustrations ; 25 cm.Content type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780995122963; 0995122962.Subject(s): Dental auxiliary personnel -- New Zealand | Dental auxiliary personnel -- Training -- New Zealand | School Dental Service -- New Zealand -- History | Dental public health -- New Zealand -- History | Dental schools -- New Zealand -- History | New Zealand -- New Zealand -- HistorySummary: "In 1921, the School Dental Service was established. A social experiment unique to New Zealand, it was lauded around the world and later modelled in 15 countries. This is the story of those on the front line of that experiment, the dental nurses who endured military-style training, poor resourcing and petty discipline, as well as increasingly anachronistic rules around uniform and behaviour. Bringing together interviews with dental nurses from across the decades, Noel O'Hare has created an engaging social history of New Zealand in the twentieth century, through the eyes and voices of young women. The book begins on 29 March 1974, when more than 600 dental nurses from throughout New Zealand marched to Parliament in their uniforms to protest at their low pay. They hadn't had a pay rise in 21 years . . ." -- Publisher description.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction (NEST)
Non-Fiction (NEST) 617.6 OHA Checked out 29/08/2020

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

The story of the young women charged with waging war on our nation's poor teeth In 1921, when the School Dental Service was established, New Zealand embarked on a unique social experiment: improving the terrible state of the nation's teeth. Set up by veterans of the First World War, the service -- focused on 'battling Bertie Germ' -- was run like a military operation and the all-female dental nurses were treated like foot-soldiers: underpaid, overworked and poorly resourced. Eventually they rebelled. In this lively history, Noel O'Hare details the nurses' experiences on the front line of dental health, and explores what that reveals about our society's attitudes to women, work and children's health.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

"In 1921, the School Dental Service was established. A social experiment unique to New Zealand, it was lauded around the world and later modelled in 15 countries. This is the story of those on the front line of that experiment, the dental nurses who endured military-style training, poor resourcing and petty discipline, as well as increasingly anachronistic rules around uniform and behaviour. Bringing together interviews with dental nurses from across the decades, Noel O'Hare has created an engaging social history of New Zealand in the twentieth century, through the eyes and voices of young women. The book begins on 29 March 1974, when more than 600 dental nurses from throughout New Zealand marched to Parliament in their uniforms to protest at their low pay. They hadn't had a pay rise in 21 years . . ." -- Publisher description.