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More : the 10,000-year rise of the world economy / Philip Coggan.

By: Coggan, Philip.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London, England : Profile Books Ltd., 2020Copyright date: ©2020Description: xiii, 466 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : colour illustrations ; 24 cm.Content type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 1781258082; 9781781258088; 1788163850; 9781788163859.Subject(s): Economic historyDDC classification: 330.9 Summary: Philip Coggan takes us from the ancient mountains of North Wales through Grand Central station and the great civilizations of Mesopotamia to the factories of Malaysia, showing how changes in agriculture, finance, technology, work, and demographics have driven the progress of human civilization. It's the story of how trade became broader and deeper over thousands of years, how governments have influenced economies, for good or ill, and how societies have repeatedly tried to tame and harness finance. This book shows how, at every step of our long journey, it was the connection between people that resulted in more trade, more specialization, more freedom, and ultimately, more prosperity.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction (NEST)
Non-Fiction (NEST) 330.9 COG Checked out 10/08/2020

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

A panoramic history of trade, industry and economic thought, from prehistoric times to the present.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Philip Coggan takes us from the ancient mountains of North Wales through Grand Central station and the great civilizations of Mesopotamia to the factories of Malaysia, showing how changes in agriculture, finance, technology, work, and demographics have driven the progress of human civilization. It's the story of how trade became broader and deeper over thousands of years, how governments have influenced economies, for good or ill, and how societies have repeatedly tried to tame and harness finance. This book shows how, at every step of our long journey, it was the connection between people that resulted in more trade, more specialization, more freedom, and ultimately, more prosperity.