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Dismantling privilege : an ethics of accountability / Mary Elizabeth Hobgood.

By: Hobgood, Mary E, 1946-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Cleveland, Ohio : Pilgrim Press, 2009Edition: Revised and updated, revised edition.Description: xiv, 210 pages ; 23 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0829818235; 9780829818239.Subject(s): Elite (Social sciences) -- United States | Social stratification | Social ethics | Christian sociologyDDC classification: 305.5/12/0973 Summary: Class and race are often assumed to be natural, biologically determined categories when in fact they are social constructs. Together with gender, these distinctions are perpetuated and exploited by the most powerful social group -- white male elites -- to maintain their privilege. Christian ethicist Mary Elizabeth Hobgood addresses these dynamics not only because they are unjust, but because they create isolation and spiritual impoverishment and promote cultural values that do harm to everyone irrespective of class, race, or gender. In "Dismantling Privilege" she identifies an ethical agenda for elites and seeks to persuade them that an agenda of justice and an ethics of accountability will be of primary benefit to them. The solution, Hobgood asserts, is a politics of solidarity grounded in the realization that no one is free until all are free.-- Google Books.
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Non-Fiction 305.512 HOB Checked out 25/07/2020

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Mary Elizabeth Hobgood's bestselling Dismantling Privilege: An Ethics of Accountability reminds us the categories of gender, race, and class are not biological givens, but social constructs used to suppress some groups while giving power to others, diminishing the lives of all humankind and forestalling the possibility of a better society. Hobgood's proposed solution - a politics of accountability and solidarity - resonates throughout this new edition, which also includes a fresh introduction, updated statistics, and a concluding chapter targeting ecological crisis as the most pressing concern for accountable disciples. Additionally, Dismantling Privilege: An Ethics of Accountability looks to political stirrings in Africa and Latin America for inspiration in building the movement.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 175-200) and index.

Class and race are often assumed to be natural, biologically determined categories when in fact they are social constructs. Together with gender, these distinctions are perpetuated and exploited by the most powerful social group -- white male elites -- to maintain their privilege.

Christian ethicist Mary Elizabeth Hobgood addresses these dynamics not only because they are unjust, but because they create isolation and spiritual impoverishment and promote cultural values that do harm to everyone irrespective of class, race, or gender. In "Dismantling Privilege" she identifies an ethical agenda for elites and seeks to persuade them that an agenda of justice and an ethics of accountability will be of primary benefit to them. The solution, Hobgood asserts, is a politics of solidarity grounded in the realization that no one is free until all are free.-- Google Books.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Preface (p. ix)
  • Acknowledgments (p. xiii)
  • Introduction (p. 1)
  • Theological Grounding for Dismantling Privilege (p. 1)
  • Hurricane Katrina (p. 3)
  • War (p. 4)
  • Ecological Crisis (p. 6)
  • Economic Polarization and Post-Democracy (p. 8)
  • Challenging the Adequacy of Our Ideology (p. 11)
  • 1 An Ethical Agenda for Elites (p. 14)
  • Working Definitions (p. 16)
  • Why the Privileged Should Dismantle Privilege (p. 19)
  • The Moral Ambiguity of Being Elite (p. 21)
  • Social Theory and Christian Ethics (p. 25)
  • The Autonomous Self and Invisible Group Power (p. 27)
  • The Self as a Self-in-Relation (p. 30)
  • Moral and Political Tasks (p. 33)
  • Privilege and Christian Ethics (p. 34)
  • Why Christianity Has Avoided Examining Privilege (p. 36)
  • An Agenda for the Privileged (p. 38)
  • 2 Dismantling Whiteness (p. 42)
  • Race is Grounded in Class (p. 42)
  • The Race System (p. 44)
  • What is at Stake for Whites (p. 46)
  • The Dangers of Exploring Whiteness (p. 49)
  • Whiteness as Wages for industrial Morality (p. 50)
  • Making Whiteness Divine to Increase White Wages (p. 54)
  • Invisible Affirmative Action for Whites (p. 55)
  • Economic Affirmative Action for Whites (p. 56)
  • Cultural Affirmative Action for Whites (p. 58)
  • Political Affirmative Action for Whites (p. 58)
  • Ecological Affirmative Action for Whites (p. 60)
  • How Whites are Hurt by White Privilege (p. 61)
  • Catholic Social Teaching and Racism (p. 63)
  • Dismantling Whiteness through Coalition Politics (p. 64)
  • 3 An Economic Ethics of Right Relationship (p. 66)
  • The Taboo Social System of Class (p. 66)
  • Blood on Our Food, Tears on Our Clothes (p. 69)
  • Scripture, Tradition, and Class Power (p. 70)
  • Camouflaging Group Membership (p. 73)
  • Dividing the Working Class by Gender, Race, and Income (p. 77)
  • Increasing Income Stratification in the Working Class (p. 80)
  • Using Race and Gender to Hide Class (p. 85)
  • The Ideology of Hard Work and Bad Luck (p. 86)
  • The Recent History of Capitalism (p. 88)
  • The System of Finance (p. 93)
  • Economic Crisis (p. 94)
  • Intensified Managerial Control (p. 96)
  • Who Benefits and Who Suffers? (p. 99)
  • How Elites Are Vulnerable and Damaged (p. 103)
  • Violation of Trust-Destruction of Community (p. 106)
  • Solidarity Is the Solution (p. 108)
  • 4 Constructing a Compassionate Sexuality (p. 111)
  • The Dynamics of Gender (p. 111)
  • Gender and Economic Power (p. 113)
  • Gender, Eros, and Cultural Power (p. 117)
  • It Has Not Always and Everywhere Been So (p. 123)
  • How Elites Are Hurt (p. 127)
  • The Contribution of Christian Teachings (p. 130)
  • Sketching an Ethical Eroticism (p. 132)
  • 5 Relational Labor and the Politics of Solidarity (p. 136)
  • Why Diverse Subordinates Are Natural Allies (p. 137)
  • Why Alliances Are Hard to Build (p. 139)
  • Relational Labor and the Prophetic Imagination (p. 141)
  • Relational Labor and Christian Ethics (p. 144)
  • Analysis Is Not Politics (p. 147)
  • The Nature of Authentic Privilege (p. 148)
  • 6 Intellectual and Political Struggle: An Agenda for Accountable Disciples (p. 150)
  • Ecologizing the Economy: The Most Pressing Moral Assignment (p. 153)
  • Earth Healing and Human Evolution (p. 155)
  • Climate Meltdown and Earth-Healing Policies (p. 157)
  • Needed: Disciples Sawy about Power and Responsibility (p. 159)
  • Learning from Africa and Latin America (p. 161)
  • Political Strategies in U.S. Justice Struggle (p. 168)
  • The Universe Bends toward Justice (p. 171)
  • Notes (p. 175)
  • Index (p. 201)