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Japan's infamous Unit 731 : firsthand accounts of Japan's wartime human experimentation program / Hal Gold ; with a new foreword by Yumi Totani.

By: Gold, Hal [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Tokyo : Tuttle Publishing, [2019]Copyright date: �2019Description: 255 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm.Content type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780804852197; 0804852197.Other title: Japan's infamous Unit Seven Hundred Thirty-One.Uniform titles: Unit 731. Subject(s): Japan. Rikugun. Kant�ogun. Butai, Dai 731 -- History | World War, 1939-1945 -- Regimental histories -- Japan | World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, Japanese | Biological warfare -- JapanDDC classification: 940.541352 Summary: Some of the cruelest deeds of Japan's war in Asia did not occur on the battlefield, but in quiet, antiseptic medical wards in obscure parts of the continent. Far from front lines and prying eyes, Japanese doctors and their assistants subjected human guinea pigs to gruesome medical experiments. In the first part of Unit 731: Testimony, author Hal Gold draws upon a painstakingly accumulated reservoir of sources to construct a portrait of the Imperial Japanese Army's most notorious medical unit, giving an overview of its history and detailing its most shocking activities. The second half of the book consists almost entirely of the words of former unit members themselves, taken from remarks they made at a traveling Unit 731 exhibition held around Japan in 1994-95. These people recount their vivid firsthand memories of what it was like to cut open pregnant women as they lay awake on the vivisection table, inject plague germs into healthy farmers, and carry buckets of fresh blood and organs through corridors to their appropriate destinations. Unit 731: Testimony represents an essential addition to the growing body of literature on the still-unfolding story of one of the most infamous military outfits in modern history. By showing how the ethics of "normal" men and women, and even an entire profession, can be warped by the fire of war, this important book offers a window on a time of human madness, in the hope that such days will never come again.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

This is a riveting and disturbing account of the medical atrocities performed in China during WWII.

Some of the cruelest deeds of Japan's war in Asia did not occur on the battlefield, but in quiet, antiseptic medical wards in obscure parts of China. Far from front lines and prying eyes, Japanese doctors and their assistants subjected human guinea pigs to gruesome medical experiments in the name of science and Japan's wartime chemical and biological warfare research.

Author Hal Gold draws upon a wealth of sources to construct a portrait of the Imperial Japanese Army's most notorious medical unit, giving an overview of its history and detailing its most shocking activities. The book presents the words of former unit members themselves, taken from remarks they made at a traveling Unit 731 exhibition held in Japan in 1994-95. They recount vivid first-hand memories of what it was like to take part in horrific experiments on men, women and children, their motivations and reasons why they chose to speak about their actions all these years later.

A new foreword by historian Yuma Totani examines the actions of Unit 731, the post-war response by the Allies and the lasting importance of the book. Japan's Infamous Unit 731 represents an essential addition to the growing body of literature on the still unfolding story of some of the most infamous war crimes in modem military history. By showing how the ethics of normal men and women, and even an entire profession, can be warped by the fire of war, this important book offers a window on a time of human madness and the hope that history will not be repeated.

Previous edition published as: Unit 731 : testimony. Tokyo : Yenbooks, 1996.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 249-255)

Some of the cruelest deeds of Japan's war in Asia did not occur on the battlefield, but in quiet, antiseptic medical wards in obscure parts of the continent. Far from front lines and prying eyes, Japanese doctors and their assistants subjected human guinea pigs to gruesome medical experiments. In the first part of Unit 731: Testimony, author Hal Gold draws upon a painstakingly accumulated reservoir of sources to construct a portrait of the Imperial Japanese Army's most notorious medical unit, giving an overview of its history and detailing its most shocking activities. The second half of the book consists almost entirely of the words of former unit members themselves, taken from remarks they made at a traveling Unit 731 exhibition held around Japan in 1994-95. These people recount their vivid firsthand memories of what it was like to cut open pregnant women as they lay awake on the vivisection table, inject plague germs into healthy farmers, and carry buckets of fresh blood and organs through corridors to their appropriate destinations. Unit 731: Testimony represents an essential addition to the growing body of literature on the still-unfolding story of one of the most infamous military outfits in modern history. By showing how the ethics of "normal" men and women, and even an entire profession, can be warped by the fire of war, this important book offers a window on a time of human madness, in the hope that such days will never come again.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Foreword (p. 9)
  • Acknowledgments (p. 15)
  • Introduction (p. 17)
  • Part 1 Historical Overview
  • 1 Background of Japanese Biological Warfare (p. 25)
  • A Proud Medical Tradition (p. 25)
  • Ishii Shiro (p. 30)
  • Manchuria (p. 34)
  • The Stage Is Set (p. 36)
  • 2 A New Type of Warfare (p. 41)
  • The Fortress/Bacteria Factory (p. 41)
  • End of the Fortress (p. 45)
  • Pingfang (p. 47)
  • Satellite Facilities (p. 56)
  • Ties to the Civilian Sector (p. 66)
  • Ishii's Battlefield Debut (p. 70)
  • 3 Creating Pathology (p. 75)
  • Rodents and Insects (p. 75)
  • Four Areas of Experimentation (p. 77)
  • 4 End and Aftermath (p. 88)
  • Attempted Biological Warfare against the Americans (p. 93)
  • Covering the Traces (p. 99)
  • American Occupation (p. 100)
  • Superpower jockeying (p. 107)
  • 5 Unit 731 in Modern Times (p. 121)
  • The Teikoku Bank Incident (p. 122)
  • Japanese Biological Warfare Data in the Korean War (p. 128)
  • Shinjuku Shock (p. 131)
  • The Unit Leaders in Peacetime (p. 143)
  • Postwar Careers: Plum Positions (p. 145)
  • Part 2 Testimonies
  • Introduction (p. 151)
  • Researcher attached to Unit 1644 (p. 154)
  • Virologist attached to Unit 731 (p. 156)
  • Lecture, "Unit 731 and Comfort Women" (p. 163)
  • Youth Corps member (p. 169)
  • Hygiene specialist (p. 178)
  • Hygiene specialist (p. 180)
  • Kenpeitai member (p. 189)
  • Three Youth Corps members (p. 191)
  • Nurse attached to Unit 731 (p. 200)
  • Kenpeitai officer (p. 202)
  • Army doctor (p. 206)
  • Civilian employee of Unit 731 in Tokyo (p. 215)
  • Youth Corps member attached to Unit 731 (p. 219)
  • Professor emeritus at Osaka University (p. 221)
  • Member of the Hygiene Corps (p. 222)
  • Soldier stationed at Pingfang (p. 227)
  • Soldier attached to Unit 731 (p. 233)
  • Nurse attached to Unit 731 (p. 234)
  • Intelligence officer (p. 235)
  • Army major and pharmacist attached to Unit 731 (p. 238)
  • Army major and technician attached to Unit 516 (p. 240)
  • Ishii Shiro's driver (p. 240)
  • Pharmacist attached to the laboratory at Dalian (p. 242)
  • Captain, Japanese Imperial Army (p. 243)
  • Selected Bibliography (p. 249)