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The last train to London : a novel / Meg Waite Clayton.

By: Clayton, Meg Waite.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York, New York : Harper, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, 2019Edition: First edition.Description: 451 pages ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780062946935; 0062946935; 9780062966285; 0062966286.Subject(s): Kindertransports (Rescue operations) -- Fiction | Jews -- Fiction | Jewish children -- Fiction | Jewish refugees -- Fiction | Vienna (Austria) -- FictionGenre/Form: Historical fiction. DDC classification: 813/.6 Summary: "In 1936, the Nazis are little more than loud, brutish bores to fifteen-year old Stephan Neuman, the son of a wealthy and influential Jewish family and budding playwright whose playground extends from Vienna's streets to its intricate underground tunnels. Stephan's best friend and companion is the brilliant Zofie-Helene, a Christian girl whose mother edits a progressive, anti-Nazi newspaper. But the two adolescents' carefree innocence is shattered when the Nazis' take control. There is hope in the darkness, though. Truus Wijsmuller, a member of the Dutch resistance, risks her life smuggling Jewish children out of Nazi Germany to the nations that will take them. It is a mission that becomes even more dangerous after the Anschluss - Hitler's annexation of Austria - as, across Europe, countries close their borders to the growing number of refugees desperate to escape. Tante Truus, as she is known, is determined to save as many children as she can. After Britain passes a measure to take in at-risk child refugees from the German Reich, she dares to approach Adolf Eichmann, the man who would later help devise the "Final Solution to the Jewish Question," in a race against time to bring children like Stephan, his young brother Walter, and Zofie-Helene on a perilous journey to an uncertain future abroad."-- Publisher description.
List(s) this item appears in: Book Chat Fiction notes: Click to open in new window
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Fiction Collection (New)
Fiction Collection (New) CLAY Checked out 03/06/2021 T00826392
Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Fiction Collection
Fiction Collection CLAY Checked out 20/05/2021 T00826395
Fiction Gonville Library
Fiction Collection
Fiction Collection CLAY Available T00826393
Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Fiction Collection
Fiction Collection CLAY In transit from Davis (Central) Library to Hakeke Street Library since 11/05/2021 T00820352
Fiction Rangiora Street Library
Fiction Collection
Fiction Collection CLAY Available T00826394
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

<p>National bestseller</p> <p>A Historical Novels Review Editors' Choice<br> <br></p> <p>A Jewish Book Award Finalist</p> <p>The New York Times bestselling author of Beautiful Exiles conjures her best novel yet, a pre-World War II-era story with the emotional resonance of Orphan Train and All the Light We Cannot See, centering on the Kindertransports that carried thousands of children out of Nazi-occupied Europe--and one brave woman who helped them escape to safety.<br> <br> <br> <br> In 1936, the Nazi are little more than loud, brutish bores to fifteen-year old Stephan Neuman, the son of a wealthy and influential Jewish family and budding playwright whose playground extends from Vienna's streets to its intricate underground tunnels. Stephan's best friend and companion is the brilliant Žofie-Helene, a Christian girl whose mother edits a progressive, anti-Nazi newspaper. But the two adolescents' carefree innocence is shattered when the Nazis' take control.</p> <p>There is hope in the darkness, though. Truus Wijsmuller, a member of the Dutch resistance, risks her life smuggling Jewish children out of Nazi Germany to the nations that will take them. It is a mission that becomes even more dangerous after the Anschluss--Hitler's annexation of Austria--as, across Europe, countries close their borders to the growing number of refugees desperate to escape.</p> <p>Tante Truus, as she is known, is determined to save as many children as she can. After Britain passes a measure to take in at-risk child refugees from the German Reich, she dares to approach Adolf Eichmann, the man who would later help devise the "Final Solution to the Jewish Question," in a race against time to bring children like Stephan, his young brother Walter, and Žofie-Helene on a perilous journey to an uncertain future abroad.</p>

Includes bibliographical references.

"In 1936, the Nazis are little more than loud, brutish bores to fifteen-year old Stephan Neuman, the son of a wealthy and influential Jewish family and budding playwright whose playground extends from Vienna's streets to its intricate underground tunnels. Stephan's best friend and companion is the brilliant Zofie-Helene, a Christian girl whose mother edits a progressive, anti-Nazi newspaper. But the two adolescents' carefree innocence is shattered when the Nazis' take control. There is hope in the darkness, though. Truus Wijsmuller, a member of the Dutch resistance, risks her life smuggling Jewish children out of Nazi Germany to the nations that will take them. It is a mission that becomes even more dangerous after the Anschluss - Hitler's annexation of Austria - as, across Europe, countries close their borders to the growing number of refugees desperate to escape. Tante Truus, as she is known, is determined to save as many children as she can. After Britain passes a measure to take in at-risk child refugees from the German Reich, she dares to approach Adolf Eichmann, the man who would later help devise the "Final Solution to the Jewish Question," in a race against time to bring children like Stephan, his young brother Walter, and Zofie-Helene on a perilous journey to an uncertain future abroad."-- Publisher description.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Publishers Weekly Review

Clayton (Beautiful Exiles) reaches into the troubled lives of the Third Reich's civilian victims, drawing readers into one woman's efforts to save children in this excellent novel based on actual events. Geertruida Wijsmuller, known as "Tante Truus" and part of the Dutch resistance, is determined to risk everything to save children of all ages despite--or because of--her inability to bring a pregnancy to term herself. In Vienna, the lives of two children are highlighted: Stephan Neuman is Jewish, and because he turned 17 in 1938, he's barely allowed to escape to England in the 1938--1939 Kindertransport, which will not accept 18-year-olds. Stephan's friend and budding beloved, 15-year-old Sofie-Helene Perger, is not Jewish, but her mother is a journalist who refuses to stop writing articles critical of Hitler. Stephan, an aspiring playwright, must adapt to the changes in his life, which was once filled with wealth from his father's famous chocolate factory. Math prodigy Sofie also tries to adapt, uncertain about how to help Stephan without threatening her own family. The children and Tante Truus's stories don't intersect until later in the book, when she secures them safe passage to England due to a daring, last-second decision. Clayton effectively captures the dim hope of survival amid the mounting terror of the lead-up to WWII. This is a standout historical fiction that serves as a chilling reminder of how insidious, pervasive evil can gradually seep into everyday lives. Agent: Marly Rusoff, Marly Rusoff & Associates, Inc. (Sept.)

Booklist Review

Geertruida Wijsmuller-Meijer a real-life Dutch Resistance fighter and the heroine of Clayton's enlightening, meticulously researched historical novel began rescuing Jewish children from the Third Reich as early as 1933. As Nazi power grew, she expanded her efforts, ushering hundreds of children to safety. Clayton's story of this remarkable woman, known as Tante Truus, is enriched by a compelling cast of fictional characters. Stephan Neuman, son of a Jewish businessman in Austria, is a budding playwright at 17; his good friend, Zofie-Helene, is a math whiz. In chapters alternating with those describing Tante Truus' dangerous trips between Austria and the Netherlands, Clayton relates the struggles faced by the young pair. Stephan's father is picked up by the Gestapo, and dies in German custody; Stephan hides in underground tunnels. Zofie is Christian, but her father is dead, and her mother, a well-known journalist who writes fearlessly about the Nazi treatment of Jews, is sent to jail. Eventually Tante Truus convinces Adolf Eichmann to let her take one last train of Austrian children to England, where they will be housed in camps until families are found to shelter them. Stephan, Zofie, and Stephan's younger brother make this harrowing journey to an uncertain future, one experienced by so many.--Deborah Donovan Copyright 2010 Booklist

Kirkus Book Review

Clayton's (Beautiful Exiles, 2018, etc.) novel about the Kindertransport program joins the recent spate of Holocaust books (from All the Light We Cannot See to The Tattooist of Auschwitz) that allow readers to identity with heroes and survivors instead of victims.The real-life heroine here is Truus Wijsmuller, the Dutch Christian woman instrumental in smuggling approximately 10,000 children out of the Reich and into England through the Kindertransport. The villain is the infamous Adolph Eichmann. Early in his career Eichmann authored the influential paper "The Jewish Problem," about how to rid the Reich of Jews. After Germany took over Austria he landed a powerful position in Vienna. In 1938, Truus met with Eichmann, who offered what he assumed was an impossible deal: If she could arrange papers for exactly 600 healthy children to travel in one week's timeon the Sabbath, when Jewish law forbids travelhe would allow safe passage. With help from British activists, Truus successfully made the arrangements and found refuge for all 600 children in England. Clayton intersects these historical figures and events with fictional characters trapped in Vienna. Aspiring playwright Stephan, 15 years old when the novel begins in 1936, comes from a wealthy Jewish family, manufacturers of highly prized chocolate candies. The Nazis strip ownership of the chocolate factory from Stephan's father and hand it to Stephan's Aryan Uncle Michael. A guilty collaborator torn between greed and love, Michael is the novel's most realistically portrayed character, neither good nor entirely evil. Sensitive, brilliant, and precocious, Stephan is naturally drawn to equally sensitive, brilliant, and precocious ofie-Helene, a math genius whose anti-Nazi father died under questionable circumstances and whose journalist mother writes the outspokenly anti-Nazi articles about actual events, like Britain's limiting Jewish immigration and the invasion of Czechoslovakia, that punctuate the plot. After Kristallnacht Stephan ends up hiding in Vienna's sewers (a weird nod to Orson Welles in The Third Man), and ofie-Helene's mother is arrested. Will Stephan and ofie-Helene end up among the children Truus saves?Workmanlike and less riveting than the subject matter. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.