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How to talk so little kids will listen : a survival guide to life with children ages 2-7 / Joanna Faber & Julie King ; with a foreword by Adele Faber.

By: Faber, Joanna.
Contributor(s): King, Julie (Parent educator) [author.] | Faber, Adele [author of introduction, etc.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London, England : Piccadilly Press, 2017Copyright date: ©2017Description: xxi, 409 pages : illustrations ; 20 cm.Content type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781848126145 (paperback); 184812614X (paperback).Subject(s): Parenting | Interpersonal communication | Interpersonal communication in children | Parent and childDDC classification: 649/.12 Summary: For over thirty-five years, parents have turned to How to Talk So Kids Will Listen & Listen So Kids Will Talk for its respectful and effective solutions to the unending challenges of raising children. Now, in response to growing demand, Adele's daughter, Joanna Faber, along with Julie King, tailor How to Talk's powerful communication skills to children ages two to seven. Faber and King, each a parenting expert in her own right, share their wisdom accumulated over years of conducting How To Talk workshops with parents and a broad variety of professionals. With a lively combination of storytelling, cartoons, and fly-on-the-wall discussions from their workshops, they provide concrete tools and tips that will transform your relationship with the young kids in your life. What do you do with a little kid who... won't brush her teeth... screams in his car seat... pinches the baby... refuses to eat vegetables... throws books in the library... runs rampant in the supermarket? Organized according to common challenges and conflicts, this book is an essential emergency first-aid manual of communication strategies, including a chapter that addresses the special needs of children with sensory processing and autism spectrum disorders. This user-friendly guide will empower parents and caregivers of young children to forge rewarding, joyful relationships with terrible two-year-olds, truculent three-year-olds, ferocious four-year-olds, foolhardy five-year-olds, self-centered six-year-olds, and the occasional semi-civilized seven-year-old. And, it will help little kids grow into self-reliant big kids who are cooperative and connected to their parents, teachers, siblings, and peers.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Parenting Collection
Parenting Collection 649.12 FAB Checked out 24/07/2020

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

From the widely acclaimed HOW TO TALK series, discover tried and tested communication strategies to survive - and thrive - with kids ages 2-7.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

For over thirty-five years, parents have turned to How to Talk So Kids Will Listen & Listen So Kids Will Talk for its respectful and effective solutions to the unending challenges of raising children. Now, in response to growing demand, Adele's daughter, Joanna Faber, along with Julie King, tailor How to Talk's powerful communication skills to children ages two to seven. Faber and King, each a parenting expert in her own right, share their wisdom accumulated over years of conducting How To Talk workshops with parents and a broad variety of professionals. With a lively combination of storytelling, cartoons, and fly-on-the-wall discussions from their workshops, they provide concrete tools and tips that will transform your relationship with the young kids in your life. What do you do with a little kid who... won't brush her teeth... screams in his car seat... pinches the baby... refuses to eat vegetables... throws books in the library... runs rampant in the supermarket? Organized according to common challenges and conflicts, this book is an essential emergency first-aid manual of communication strategies, including a chapter that addresses the special needs of children with sensory processing and autism spectrum disorders. This user-friendly guide will empower parents and caregivers of young children to forge rewarding, joyful relationships with terrible two-year-olds, truculent three-year-olds, ferocious four-year-olds, foolhardy five-year-olds, self-centered six-year-olds, and the occasional semi-civilized seven-year-old. And, it will help little kids grow into self-reliant big kids who are cooperative and connected to their parents, teachers, siblings, and peers.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Parent and educator Faber, with educator King, picks up where esteemed mom Adele Faber (How To Talk So Kids Will Listen) left off with this updated "survival guide" for talking to little kids and gaining compliance. Her wisdom is in the same affectionate and funny style of mom: "Enough with all the talk about feelings. It's lovely to know we're enhancing our children's confidence but we still have to get our kids to do things." Faber zeroes in on the most common (and irritating) things and tactics little ones employ, and provides caregivers with a clear and supportive path to holding their own. From tattling ("snitches and whistleblowers") to runaways ("kids who take off in the parking lot and other public places"), the authors describe exactly what life with little kids is like and make neither excuses nor pedagogical pronouncements; their advice is always supportive, appropriate, and ultimately best for the parking lot escapee in question. VERDICT Parents should not be put off by this volume's length. The "How To Talk" books are treasures to read. All libraries should acquire and recommend with gusto. © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly Review

Anyone who has ever tried to entice a young child to take a nap or eat a healthy dinner knows that meeting willful behavior with a firm, yet nurturing approach requires patience, understanding, and flexibility. This new guidebook by lifelong friends Faber (coauthor of How to Talk So Kids Will Listen and Listen So Kids Will Talk) and King, a parent educator and consultant, will help parents navigate this sometimes bumpy road. The examples and suggestions they provide are relatable and authentic, the direct result of their own experiences along with feedback from other parents. The first section discusses basic tools to help parents cope "when a youngster goes haywire," exploring topics such as "engaging cooperation" and "avoiding combat," with each chapter featuring a brief recap at the end. Part two shows "the tools in action," highlighting the issues Faber and King view as most challenging and how the tools can be used to deal with them. The authors' creative ideas will help parents feel they are not alone in dealing with little runaways, arguments over tooth brushing, tattling, and numerous other child-rearing dilemmas. As Faber notes, "Sometimes simple survival is a good goal." Agent: Robert Markel, Markel Enterprises. (Jan.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

School Library Journal Review

Parent and educator Faber, with educator King, picks up where esteemed mom Adele Faber (How To Talk So Kids Will Listen) left off with this updated "survival guide" for talking to little kids and gaining compliance. Her wisdom is in the same affectionate and funny style of mom: "Enough with all the talk about feelings. It's lovely to know we're enhancing our children's confidence but we still have to get our kids to do things." Faber zeroes in on the most common (and irritating) things and tactics little ones employ, and provides caregivers with a clear and supportive path to holding their own. From tattling ("snitches and whistleblowers") to runaways ("kids who take off in the parking lot and other public places"), the authors describe exactly what life with little kids is like and make neither excuses nor pedagogical pronouncements; their advice is always supportive, appropriate, and ultimately best for the parking lot escapee in question. VERDICT Parents should not be put off by this volume's length. The "How To Talk" books are treasures to read. All libraries should acquire and recommend with gusto.-Julianne Smith, Ypsilanti District Library, MI © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Booklist Review

Parenting young children can be challenging the urge to treat them like miniature adults is appealing, but it's difficult (if not impossible) to reason with them. Enter experienced parent educators Faber and King, who share tips and stories for coping with sticky little-kid-related problems. The first section provides an overview of their techniques, beginning with tools for handling emotions, which are often the root cause of frustration for young children. The second part provides real-life examples of the tools applied to common problems, including tattling, picky eating, tantrums, and sibling rivalry. The authors provide simple scripts that can be easily adapted, and each chapter ends with a bullet-point overview of the tools for quick reference. Examples and stories from parents of non-neurotypical children are included throughout, and the chapter Children Who Are Differently Wired provides some basic suggestions for parenting children with autism and sensory-processing disorders. The authors' techniques may take some practice, especially for frustrated and frazzled parents, but parents looking for peace, harmony, and cooperation will find a wealth of options in this guide.--Donohue, Nanette Copyright 2017 Booklist

Kirkus Book Review

Advice for parents on handling toddlers to pre-tweens.Faberthe daughter of Adele Faber, the author of the bestselling How to Talk So Kids Will Listen and Listen So Kids Will Talk (1980)and her good friend King combine their years of experience as mothers with new research on child-rearing to offer a useful guide for parents and other adults regarding the 2-to-7 age group. With a format similar to the original book, the authors begin with the basics: acknowledging a child's feelings through words, writing, and artwork; using play, offering choices, and patience, among other methods, to enlist cooperation; instilling discipline and resolving conflicts without the use of threats, character attacks, or physical punishment. In the second section, the authors move on to specific issues: eating and food battles, brushing teeth, shopping with young children, name-calling, hitting and other physically aggressive behavior, getting children to sleep, navigating anger, interacting with pets, how to handle lying, and a host of other common and difficult scenarios adults face on a daily basis. Faber and King not only offer their own lives as examples; they also include numerous scenarios from other parents who have used the tactics presented in the authors' group workshops. For those in need of a quick rehash of each chapter, short cartoons summarize each section. Although the information is mostly common-sense, the logical presentation enables readers to quickly understand why one method works and another method doesn't, making it easy for the adult to incorporate subtle changes into his/her behavior, which in turn creates profound differences in the child. Any new parent, teacher, or day care operator will benefit from reading this helpful book. Adele Faber provides the foreword. Accessible, highly effective methods for raising well-behaved children. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.