Whanganuilibrary.com
Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Doughnut economics : seven ways to think like a 21st-century economist / Kate Raworth

By: Raworth, Kate.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London, England : Random House Business Books, 2018Copyright date: ©2017Description: viii, 372 pages : illustrations ; 20 cm.Content type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781847941398 (paperback); 1847941397 (paperback).Other title: 7 ways to think like a 21st century economist | Seven ways to think like a twenty first century economist.Subject(s): Economics | Economic forecasting | Economics -- HistoryDDC classification: 330 Summary: Economics is broken. It has failed to predict, let alone prevent, financial crises that have shaken the foundations of our societies. Its out-dated theories have permitted a world in which extreme poverty persists while the wealth of the super-rich grows year on year. And its blind spots have led to policies that are degrading the living world on a scale that threatens all of our futures. Can it be fixed? In Doughnut Economics, Oxford academic Kate Raworth identifies seven critical ways in which mainstream economics has led us astray, and sets out a roadmap for bringing humanity into a sweet spot that meets the needs of all within the means of the planet. En route, she deconstructs the character of "Rational economic man" and explains what really makes us tick. She reveals how an obsession with equilibrium has left economists helpless when facing the boom and bust of the real-world economy.She highlights the dangers of ignoring the role of energy and nature's resources - and the far-reaching implications for economic growth when we take them into account. And in the process, she creates a new, cutting-edge economic model that is fit for the 21st century - one in which a doughnut-shaped compass points the way to human progress. Ambitious, radical and rigorously argued, Doughnut Economics promises to reframe and redraw the future of economics for a new generation.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction (NEST)
Non-Fiction (NEST) 330 RAW Checked out 16/03/2020

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

As seen on BBC Newsnight.

Economics is broken, and the planet is paying the price.

Unforeseen financial crises. Extreme wealth inequality. Relentless pressure on the environment. Can we go on like this? Is there an alternative?

In Doughnut Economics , Oxford academic Kate Raworth lays out the seven deadly mistakes of economics and offers a radical re-envisioning of the system that has brought us to the point of ruin. Moving beyond the myths of 'rational economic man' and unlimited growth, Doughnut Economics zeroes in on the sweet spot- a system that meets all our needs without exhausting the planet.

The demands of the 21st century require a new shape of economics. This might just be it.

*The Sunday Times Bestseller*
*A Financial Times and Forbes Book of the Year*
*Winner of the Transmission Prize 2018*
*Longlisted for the FT /McKinsey Business Book of the Year Award 2017*

'The John Maynard Keynes of the 21st century.' George Monbiot, Guardian

'This is sharp, significant scholarship . . . Thrilling.' Times Higher Education

'Raworth's magnum opus . . . A fascinating reminder to business leaders and economists alike to stand back at a distance to examine our modern economics.' Books of the Year, Forbes

'There are some really important economic and political thinkers around at the moment - such as Kate Raworth's Doughnut Economics .' Andrew Marr, Guardian

'An admirable attempt to broaden the horizons of economic thinking.' Martin Wolf, Books of the Year, Financial Times

'A compelling and timely intervention.' Caroline Lucas MP, Books of the Year, The Ecologist

Originally published: 2017.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 301-350) and index.

Economics is broken. It has failed to predict, let alone prevent, financial crises that have shaken the foundations of our societies. Its out-dated theories have permitted a world in which extreme poverty persists while the wealth of the super-rich grows year on year. And its blind spots have led to policies that are degrading the living world on a scale that threatens all of our futures. Can it be fixed? In Doughnut Economics, Oxford academic Kate Raworth identifies seven critical ways in which mainstream economics has led us astray, and sets out a roadmap for bringing humanity into a sweet spot that meets the needs of all within the means of the planet. En route, she deconstructs the character of "Rational economic man" and explains what really makes us tick. She reveals how an obsession with equilibrium has left economists helpless when facing the boom and bust of the real-world economy.She highlights the dangers of ignoring the role of energy and nature's resources - and the far-reaching implications for economic growth when we take them into account. And in the process, she creates a new, cutting-edge economic model that is fit for the 21st century - one in which a doughnut-shaped compass points the way to human progress. Ambitious, radical and rigorously argued, Doughnut Economics promises to reframe and redraw the future of economics for a new generation.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

To be effectively critical, it helps to be an insider and, at a bare minimum, to know what you are talking about. As the "alternative facts" piled up (e.g., Samuelson did not invent the circular flow and Knight did not believe in homo economicus), this reviewer became convinced Raworth did not know enough about the history of economics. To be effectively critical, it makes sense to woo your audience, a la Keynes's "long struggle of escape," but Raworth paints a picture of economics as mindless, worthless, and without any redeeming qualities or content. So, yes, for non-experts who know that neoliberal economics has lost its way, this is a fine book. Its airy, flippant prose matches the superficial engagement with ideas, and the faithful will welcome hearing that economics is bankrupt. But make no mistake--this book is most certainly not an effective criticism of modern economics. Its impact on economics will be vanishingly small. Summing Up: Not recommended. --Humberto Barreto, DePauw University