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Necessity / Jo Walton.

By: Walton, Jo.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Walton, Jo. Thessaly: 3.Publisher: New York, New York : Tor, 2016Copyright date: ©2016Edition: First edition.Description: 334 pages ; 22 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780765379023 (hardback).Subject(s): Apollo (Deity) -- Fiction | Apollo (Greek deity) -- Fiction | Gods -- Fiction | Goddesses -- FictionGenre/Form: Fantasy fiction. DDC classification: 823/.914 Summary: The conclusion to The Just City and The Philosopher Kings. The Cities are flourishing on Plato, and even trading with multiple alien species. Then, on the same day, two things happen. Pytheas dies as a human, returning immediately as Apollo in his full glory. And there's suddenly a human ship in orbit around Plato--a ship from Earth.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Fiction Collection
Fiction Collection WALT Available T00814417
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

<p> 2017 Sunburst Award for Adult Fiction Finalist <br> <br> Necessity: the sequel to the acclaimed The Just City and The Philosopher Kings , Jo Walton's tales of gods, humans, and what they have to learn from one another. <br> <br> More than sixty-five years ago, Pallas Athena founded the Just City on an island in the eastern Mediterranean, placing it centuries before the Trojan War, populating it with teachers and children from throughout human history, and committing it to building a society based on the principles of Plato's Republic. Among the City's children was Pytheas, secretly the god Apollo in human form.<br> <br> Sixty years ago, the Just City schismed into five cities, each devoted to a different version of the original vision.<br> <br> Forty years ago, the five cities managed to bring their squabbles to a close. But in consequence of their struggle, their existence finally came to the attention of Zeus, who can't allow them to remain in deep antiquity, changing the course of human history. Convinced by Apollo to spare the Cities, Zeus instead moved everything on the island to the planet Plato, circling its own distant sun.<br> <br> Now, more than a generation has passed. The Cities are flourishing on Plato, and even trading with multiple alien species. Then, on the same day, two things happen. Pytheas dies as a human, returning immediately as Apollo in his full glory. And there's suddenly a human ship in orbit around Plato--a ship from Earth.</p>

"A Tom Doherty Associates Book."

The conclusion to The Just City and The Philosopher Kings. The Cities are flourishing on Plato, and even trading with multiple alien species. Then, on the same day, two things happen. Pytheas dies as a human, returning immediately as Apollo in his full glory. And there's suddenly a human ship in orbit around Plato--a ship from Earth.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

When we last left the Platonic experiment of the Just City, its citizens had fought wars over art and been transplanted by Zeus to a new planet to continue their attempts to live lives of excellence. This third and final volume of the trilogy opens with the planet of Plato in crisis. Apollo, who had lived there as a mortal, has recently died; Athena, the goddess who set up the whole experiment, hasn't been seen in a while; and a spaceship appears in orbit over Plato representing the human society that the Just City circumvented with their isolation. In this satisfying if not completely tidy end to the series (after The Just City and The Philosopher Kings), Walton brings back characters from the other books, making these titles that should be read in order. The author isn't afraid to pose questions that leave readers thinking and takes a deep dive into classical philosophy. -VERDICT The rewards are plentiful for fans of thoughtful speculative fiction as well as for aficionados of the classical world.-MM © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly Review

Walton delivers an adequately satisfying conclusion to her Thessaly trilogy (The Just City, The Philosopher Kings). The Greek goddess Athene brought a collection of people from ancient Greece to our near future on a planet called Plato, where they attempted to make Plato's Republic a reality. Forty years after being relocated, they finally make contact with the rest of humankind. Rather than engage with the intriguing philosophical and ethical issues presented by this reconnection, the story focuses on freshly re-deified Apollo, who discovers that Athene cannot be found anywhere and sets out to track her down. Walton makes the fresh and delightful choice to pull point-of-view characters from a broader cross-section of society, including Jason, a low-caste fisherman of the Remnant City, and Crocus, the first of the Just City's robots to become self-aware, but the story bogs down in its supernatural elements. The mortal characters are given tragically short shrift, and the abandonment of questions raised by earlier installments will leave readers wishing this story had strived for greater excellence. Agent: Jack Byrne, Sternig and Byrne Literary. (July) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Booklist Review

*Starred Review* The riveting conclusion to Walton's The Just City (2015) and The Philosopher Kings (2015) opens on a busy day: Pytheas, the human form of the god Apollo, dies (not to worry he immediately returns in his true form as deity); the goddess Athene goes missing; and the first human spaceship appears in the sky over the Just City, inviting a debate over whether to offer proof to these new arrivals that the gods exist. There are many other debates informing this novelistic exercise in dialectic, especially when Sokrates, who had been transformed into a mayfly by an angry Athene, returns in his human form. In the meantime, a search for the goddess is launched and takes on greater urgency when it is discovered that she has somehow managed to go into Chaos to study Necessity, the force that binds all thinking beings, and to learn how time began. How to rescue her from this dangerous mission is at the heart of the plot-rich novel, which is told from four points of view: that of Apollo himself, his granddaughter Marsilia, the fisherman Jason, and the sentient machine Crocus, who provides much of the philosophy that is the substance of this sometimes abstruse but nevertheless accessible novel of ideas. As before, Walton has done a superb job of world building and character development, giving readers a novel that both stimulates and satisfies.--Cart, Michael Copyright 2016 Booklist