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Collected poems / Ted Hughes ; edited by Paul Keegan.

By: Hughes, Ted, 1930-1998.
Contributor(s): Keegan, Paul [editor.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York, New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, [2005]Copyright date: ©2003Description: xli, 1333 pages ; 21 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780374529659 (paperback).Subject(s): English poetry -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Poetry.DDC classification: 821/.914 Summary: From the astonishing debut Hawk in the Rain (1957) to Birthday Letters (1998), Ted Hughes was one of postwar literature's truly prodigious poets. This volume gathers all of his work, from his earliest poems (published only in journals) through the Crow (1970), Gaudete (1977), and Tales from Ovid (1997). It includes poems Hughes composed for fine-press printers, poems he wrote as England's Poet Laureate, and those children's poems that he meant for adults as well.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

All the poems of a great 20th-century poet.

From the astonishing debut Hawk in the Rain (1957) to Birthday Letters (1998), Ted Hughes was one of postwar literature's truly prodigious poets. This remarkable volume gathers all of his work, from his earliest poems (published only in journals) through the ground-breaking volumes Crow (1970), Gaudete (1977), and Tales from Ovid (1997). It includes poems Hughes composed for fine-press printers, poems he wrote as England's Poet Laureate, and those children's poems that he meant for adults as well. This omnium-gatherum of Hughes's work is animated throughout by a voice that, as Seamus Heaney remarked, was simply "longer and deeper and rougher" than those of his contemporaries.

Includes indexes.

From the astonishing debut Hawk in the Rain (1957) to Birthday Letters (1998), Ted Hughes was one of postwar literature's truly prodigious poets. This volume gathers all of his work, from his earliest poems (published only in journals) through the Crow (1970), Gaudete (1977), and Tales from Ovid (1997). It includes poems Hughes composed for fine-press printers, poems he wrote as England's Poet Laureate, and those children's poems that he meant for adults as well.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Preface
  • Acknowledgements
  • Early Poems and Juvenilia (1946-57)
  • The Hawk in the Rain (1957)
  • Uncollected (1957-59)
  • Lupercal (1960)
  • Uncollected (1960-67)
  • From Recklings (1966)
  • From Wodwo (1967)
  • Uncollected (1967-70)
  • [Crow]
  • Four Crow Poems (1970)
  • A Few Crows (1970)
  • From Crow: From the Life and Songs of the Crow (1970)
  • From Crow Wakes (1971)
  • From Poems. Ruth Fainlight, Ted Hughes, Alan Sillitoe
  • Uncollected (1971-73)
  • Prometheus on His Crag (1973)
  • Uncollected (1974-75)
  • Season Songs (1976)
  • Uncollected (1976-77)
  • From Gaudete (1977)
  • Uncollected (1977-78)
  • From Orts (1978)
  • Cave Birds (1978)
  • Adam and the Sacred Nine (1979)
  • Remains of Elmet (1979)
  • Uncollected (1979)
  • Moortown Diary (1979)
  • 2 From Earth-Numb (1979)
  • Uncollected (1980-81)
  • From a Primer of Birds (1981)
  • Uncollected (1981-83)
  • From River (1983)
  • Uncollected (1983-86)
  • From Flowers and Insects (1986)
  • Uncollected (1987-89)
  • From Wolfwatching (1989)
  • Capriccio (1990)
  • Rain-Charm for the Duchy (1992)
  • Uncollected (1992-97)
  • Tales from Ovid (1997)
  • Birthday Letters (1998)
  • Howls & Whispers (1998)
  • Uncollected (1997-98)
  • Appendix One Notes and Prefaces by Ted Hughes
  • Appendix Two Variant Titles
  • Appendix Three Variant Lists of Contents
  • Notes
  • Index of Titles
  • Index of First Lines

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Hughes started big with his first book, Hawk in the Rain, and kept going strong until his death in 1998. This work spans four decades, right up to the poignant and contentious Birthday Letters, and is nicely rounded out by abundant supplementary material. However controversial, Hughes was a great poet, and this book proves it. (LJ 12/03) (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly Review

The main details of Hughes's life are well-known: after his National Service with the RAF, the dashing poet marries the brilliant American Sylvia Plath in 1954, and becomes an instant celebrity with the publication of Hawk in the Rain in 1957. While "The Thought-Fox" scampers its way into numberless anthologies, he publishes the poems of Lupercal (1960) and Wodwo (1967), where he treats his own voice as a force of nature, threaded through a violent animism. His wife and his lover die by suicide. He makes a major artistic breakthrough with the widely praised sequence Crow (1971), which draws on his deep knowledge of English folklore, and sacrifices, for a kind of Zarathustrian bluntness, all lingering traces of formalism (though blank verse and ballad would continue to be favored methods). He writes plays and several children's books, and becomes poet laureate in 1984, publishing a surprisingly good book of civic verse, Rain Charm for the Duchy, in 1992. His final volume, Birthday Letters, is a conflicted, front-page-news-making account of his relationship with Plath. This enormous, rewarding compendium contains all of the above as well as numerous poems that were previously uncollected (such as the lovely, Williams-y miniature "Snail" and the long "Scapegoat and Rabies," an indictment of the soldier culture that partly shaped Hughes); the entirety of his acclaimed Tales from Ovid; Hughes's appendices to the books as originally published; and copious bibliographic notes. Hughes is already canonical in Great Britain, and this volume, with its resolutely undomesticated bestiary, will mark out permanent space on the shelves of U.S. readers. (Nov.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Booklist Review

Lauded as a poetic genius and demonized for the suicide of his poet wife, Sylvia Plath, Hughes remains a controversial and compelling figure, one deserving of the serious attention this mammoth first collected edition of his poems demands. Precocious and ambitious, Hughes began winning literary awards with his debut collection, The Hawk in the Rain (1957), thanks to Plath's encouragement. Earthy and mystical and steeped in folklore and myth, Hughes wrote lush and confident nature poems until Plath's death, after which his poetry turned spare and wary. In Crow (1970), for instance, images of fallen trees, shrunken forms, camouflage, sickness, and stasis abound, followed by the torment of Prometheus on His Crag (1973). But slowly the prolific and irrepressible Hughes regained his artistic grounding, and ultimately created a great treasury of original and exalted works, finally addressing his intense relationship with Plath in his final book, Birthday Letters (1998), a resounding collection that stunned the literary world. Supported with extensive notes, this definitive volume brings Hughes into crisp focus as a complex and major poet. --Donna Seaman Copyright 2003 Booklist