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Greek to me : adventures of the comma queen / Mary Norris.

By: Norris, Mary, 1952-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Melbourne, Victoria : Text Publishing, 2019Copyright date: ©2019Description: 227 pages ; 21 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781922268242 (hardback).Subject(s): Norris, Mary, 1952- -- Travel -- Greece | Periodical editors -- United States -- Biography | Americans -- Greece -- Biography | Greek language -- Social aspects | Greece -- Description and travelGenre/Form: Travel writing. | Autobiographies.DDC classification: 306.44281 Summary: The Comma Queen returns with a buoyant book about language, love, and the wine-dark sea. In her New York Times bestseller Between You & Me, Mary Norris delighted readers with her irreverent tales of pencils and punctuation in the New Yorker's celebrated copy department. In Greek to Me, she delivers another wise and funny paean to the art of self-expression, this time filtered through her greatest passion- all things Greek. Greek to Me is a charming account of Norris's lifelong love affair with words and her solo adventures in the land of olive trees and ouzo. Along the way, Norris explains how the alphabet originated in Greece, makes the case for Athena as a feminist icon, goes searching for the fabled Baths of Aphrodite, and reveals the surprising ways Greek helped form English. Filled with Norris's memorable encounters with Greek words, Greek gods, Greek wine-and more than a few Greek men-Greek to Me is the Comma Queen's fresh take on Greece and the exotic yet strangely familiar language that so deeply influences our own.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

The Comma Queen returns with a buoyant book about language, love, and the wine-dark sea.

In her New York Times bestseller Between You & Me , Mary Norris delighted readers with her irreverent tales of pencils and punctuation in the New Yorker's celebrated copy department. In Greek to Me , she delivers another wise and funny paean to the art of self-expression, this time filtered through her greatest passion- all things Greek.

Greek to Me is a charming account of Norris's lifelong love affair with words and her solo adventures in the land of olive trees and ouzo. Along the way, Norris explains how the alphabet originated in Greece, makes the case for Athena as a feminist icon, goes searching for the fabled Baths of Aphrodite, and reveals the surprising ways Greek helped form English. Filled with Norris's memorable encounters with Greek words, Greek gods, Greek wine-and more than a few Greek men- Greek to Me is the Comma Queen's fresh take on Greece and the exotic yet strangely familiar language that so deeply influences our own.

The Comma Queen returns with a buoyant book about language, love, and the wine-dark sea. In her New York Times bestseller Between You & Me, Mary Norris delighted readers with her irreverent tales of pencils and punctuation in the New Yorker's celebrated copy department. In Greek to Me, she delivers another wise and funny paean to the art of self-expression, this time filtered through her greatest passion- all things Greek. Greek to Me is a charming account of Norris's lifelong love affair with words and her solo adventures in the land of olive trees and ouzo. Along the way, Norris explains how the alphabet originated in Greece, makes the case for Athena as a feminist icon, goes searching for the fabled Baths of Aphrodite, and reveals the surprising ways Greek helped form English. Filled with Norris's memorable encounters with Greek words, Greek gods, Greek wine-and more than a few Greek men-Greek to Me is the Comma Queen's fresh take on Greece and the exotic yet strangely familiar language that so deeply influences our own.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

In her latest work, Comma Queen Norris (Between You and Me) sings an ode to Greece in her quest to experience all things Greek-from the language and culture to the history and people-paying tribute to the gods along the way. Crediting her father for forbidding her to learn Latin as a child, Norris describes the compulsion that led her to study Greek as an adult, funding her passion through her copy editing work at The New Yorker, and testing her skill through travel. Norris's journey starts with language, from A to , detailing the history of written Greek, from the birth of the alphabet to the evolution of spacing. Becoming immersed in the language, Norris consumes every bit of Greek she can get, from singing in a chorus to skinny dipping off a beach in the southern Peloponnese region. VERDICT Norris's experience is one few can match, making this a lively read. However, the author dives deep into the details, which may be distracting for some readers. Overall, this is a good choice for anyone who enjoys travel memoirs.-Gricel Dominguez, Florida International Univ. Lib., Miami © Copyright 2019. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly Review

New Yorker copy editor Norris (Between You and Me), known for her Comma Queen videos on grammar and style, once again takes readers on an entertaining, erudite, and altogether delightful journey fueled by the love of language. Here, she chronicles her passion for all things Greek, both classical and modern. Denied a chance to study Latin in fifth grade, Morris took that latent enthusiasm for the ancients and applied it to Greek as an adult, even convincing her New Yorker supervisors to subsidize her classical Greek classes as an aid to her copyediting duties. In addition to recounting her scholastic adventures, the book recounts her successive travels through Greece, which she explored with ever-increasing linguistic skill. Morris's lively travel log skillfully meshes autobiographical anecdotes, self-reflection, and explorations of mythology-on her first trip, she gets up early during an overnight ferry ride, hoping "to catch Homer's famed rhododA¡ctylos, the rosy fingers of dawn." At the center of it all is her passion for Greek, a language often "held to be impenetrable," yet which gives her "an erotic thrill, as if every verb and noun had some visceral connection to what it stands for." For those who have long followed the Comma Queen, her latest outing will not disappoint. (Apr.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Booklist Review

Comma Queen Norris, author of the best-seller Between You & Me (2016), has done much reflection on her years as a copy editor for the New Yorker. In this memoir, she invites readers to explore the passions she stoked while away from the copy desk, particularly her adulthood dive into the Greek language. As a child, Norris relished learning the alphabet and decoding the words around her. Learning Greek allowed Norris that same enchanting experience of first-time phonics. She was even able to convince the New Yorker that learning Greek was imperative to her success as a copy editor, and the magazine paid for her university classes. Her affair with the language incited a series of trips to the Mediterranean, where she swam in the foaming seas that spawned Aphrodite and practiced her Greek tongue with a myriad of Greek suitors. The book is a delicious intersection of personal essays, etymology, and travel writing. Norris' full Greek immersion pushed her out of her comfort zone and taught her much more than the history of the comma.--Courtney Eathorne Copyright 2019 Booklist

Kirkus Book Review

The New Yorker's acclaimed "Comma Queen" explores her captivation with all things Greek.Norris (Between You Me, 2015), whose first book recounted her career in the New Yorker's copy department, offers an exuberant memoir of her transformation from a sheltered schoolgirl in Ohio to a passionate Hellenophile. Thwarted by her father from learning Latin"Was Dad against education for women? Yes"the author revived her fascination for dead languages after seeing Time Bandits, part of which was set in ancient Greece. Since the New Yorker generously paid tuition for classes that had some bearing on an employee's workas a copy editor, knowing Greek could be helpfulNorris enrolled in modern Greek and ancient Greek courses at NYU, Barnard, and Columbia. The Greek alphabet enthralled her. It was adapted radically, she discovered, from the Phoenician alphabet into "a tool for the preservation of memory, for recording history and making art." Delving into etymology, Norris makes a case for the enduring vitality of Greek by revealing its widespread roots in English. Ancient Greek, she asserts, "is far from dead." As she painstakingly immersed herself in learning the language, the author took her first trip to Greece, where she "shot around the Aegean like a pinball," making brief stops in Crete, Rhodes, Cyprus, Samos, Chios, and Lesbos. As a solo traveler, she found herself the object of much male attention. "Dining alone in restaurants," she reports, "I was a tourist attraction unto myself." That trip incited her desire to returnshe recounts subsequent journeys in lyrical detailas well as to tackle Greek classics: "I wished there were some way I could be Greek or at least pass as Greek, just by saturating myself in Greekness." She devoured books by Lawrence Durrell and, especially, Patrick Leigh Fermor, two renowned philhellenes, and she steeped herself in heroes, myths, and, gleefully, goddesses. Mythology, she writes, gave her myriad models for women's roles beyond "virgin, bride, and mother," choices that seemed so constricting to her as she grew up.A delightful celebration of a consuming passion. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.