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Whole food cooking every day / Amy Chaplin ; photographs by Anson Smart.

By: Chaplin, Amy [author.].
Contributor(s): Smart, Anson [photographer.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York, NY : Artisan, a division of Workman Publishing Co., Inc., [2019]Edition: First printing, March 2019.Description: pages cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781579658021; 1579658024.Subject(s): Cooking (Natural foods) | Natural foods | Cooking (Natural foods) | Natural foodsGenre/Form: Cookbooks. | Cookbooks.DDC classification: 641.3/02
Contents:
Chia breakfast bowls -- Genius whole-grain porridges -- Gluten-free breads -- Nut and seed milks and drinks -- Simple compotes -- Nut, seed, and coconut butters -- Simple and healing soups -- Beans -- Vegetables: land and sea -- Dressings -- Sauces -- Baked marinated tempeh -- Cauliflower bakes -- Seeded crackers -- Chia puddings -- Muffins -- Easy cakes -- Protein bars -- Granola -- Waffles -- Meal prep -- Nut and seed toasting times -- Grain cooking times -- Essential equipment -- Pantry list.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

"There's no shortage of vegetarian cookbooks out there, but it's rare that I find one that inspires me page after page as much as Amy Chaplin's Whole Food Cooking Every Day ."
-- Bon Appétit

Eating whole foods can transform a diet, and mastering the art of cooking these foods can be easy with the proper techniques and strategies. In 20 chapters, Chaplin shares ingenious recipes incorporating the foods that are key to a healthy diet: seeds and nuts, fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and other plant-based foods. Chaplin offers her secrets for eating healthy every day: mastering some key recipes and reliable techniques and then varying the ingredients based on the occasion, the season, and what you're craving. Once the reader learns one of Chaplin's base recipes, whether for gluten-free muffins, millet porridge, or baked marinated tempeh, the ways to adapt and customize it are endless: change the fruit depending on the season, include nuts or seeds for extra protein, or even change the dressing or flavoring to keep a diet varied. Chaplin encourages readers to seek out local and organic ingredients, stock their pantries with nutrient-rich whole food ingredients, prep ahead of time, and, most important, cook at home.

Includes an index.

Chia breakfast bowls -- Genius whole-grain porridges -- Gluten-free breads -- Nut and seed milks and drinks -- Simple compotes -- Nut, seed, and coconut butters -- Simple and healing soups -- Beans -- Vegetables: land and sea -- Dressings -- Sauces -- Baked marinated tempeh -- Cauliflower bakes -- Seeded crackers -- Chia puddings -- Muffins -- Easy cakes -- Protein bars -- Granola -- Waffles -- Meal prep -- Nut and seed toasting times -- Grain cooking times -- Essential equipment -- Pantry list.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Chia pudding, bircher bowls, whole-grain porridge--these are just some of the nourishing recipes presented here by popular vegan chef and food writer Chaplin. While not all of the items are strictly vegan, they are vegetarian and gluten- and dairy-free, with no refined sugar. With the focus on "whole foods," some of the recipes require more unusual ingredients and/or extra cooking and prep time, but the emphasis is on regular weekday meals. One nice feature is the use of "base" recipes that can be customized for a variety of tastes. Another helpful section features ideas for menu planning and preparing food for the week ahead, with a list of resources for purchasing harder-to-find ingredients such as dried sea vegetables, beet juice powder, and yacon syrup, made from a South American tuber. VERDICT Nicely illustrated with close-up color photographs, this book encourages cooks to try new ingredients and techniques to make healthier food but may be a little advanced for some audiences.--Susan Hurst, Miami Univ. Libs., Oxford, OH

Publishers Weekly Review

Chaplin follows up At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen with a solid collection of vegetarian, vegan, and gluten-free recipes. Chapters focus on specific items, like fruit compotes and no-bake seed bars, and nearly all start with a base recipe and then riff on it. A selection of soaked chia seed concoctions begins with two recipes, one grain-free and one with oatmeal and then expands options by adding cacao, mesquite, or maca powders, or orange juice and coconut yogurt. A chapter on porridge includes recipes for buckwheat and black rice options, and a chart on how to customize them. The primer on nut and seed milks is thorough, and a chart of steam-cooking times for 23 different vegetables can be utilized beyond the scope of the book. Gluten-free breads, such as a beet-fennel seed loaf, rely on psyllium husks instead of starches and eggs as a binder. Chaplin offers four shepherd's pie-like bakes-including one with French lentil and tomato and another with beet and cannellini beans-that call for a topping of pureed cauliflower, nuts, and nutritional yeast in place of mashed potatoes. Chaplin rounds out the collection with tips for preparation and meal-planning, as well as instructions for doing a broth cleanse. This dense volume will appeal to fans of Chaplin, and to those already familiar with this eating regimen. (Sept.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Booklist Review

In the realm of healthy cooking, Chaplin (At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen, 2014) has made a name for herself for her comprehensive approach to whole foods, gluten-free fare, vegetarian dishes, and vegan options. Here, she offers the home cook more instruction on how to achieve delicious foods within healthy parameters. For those wanting to eat more meals based on whole grains, bircher bowls of chia seeds can be whole-grain or grain-free breakfasts as dietary needs suggest. For those needing to pursue gluten-free regimens, Chaplin turns to rice and millet, adding psyllium husks to add requisite structure for leavened breads. Roasting vegetables adds both flavor and texture to ensure mealtime appeal. Pureed vegetables, from beets to artichokes to sweet corn, form bases for dressings with citrus juices to enliven almost any dish. A powerful blender is an essential kitchen appliance for the success of much of Chaplin's cuisine.--Mark Knoblauch Copyright 2010 Booklist