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Charles Booth's London poverty maps. A landmark reassessment of Booth's social survey. Mary S. Morgan; Anne Power; Katie Garner.

By: Morgan, Mary S.
Contributor(s): Power, Anne | Garner, Katie.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Farnborough : Thames & Hudson Ltd. 2019Description: 288 p.ISBN: 9780500022290; 0500022291.DDC classification: 526 Summary: In the late 19th century, Charles Booth's landmark social and economic survey found that 35% of Londoners were living in abject poverty. Between 1886 and 1903, Booth's team of social investigators interviewed Londoners from all walks of life, recording their comments, together with their own unrestrained remarks and statistical information, in 450 notebooks. Their findings formed the basis of Booth's colour-coded social mapping (from vicious and semi-criminal to wealthy) and his Inquiry into the Life and Labour of the People of London. 0Organized into 12 geographical sections, 'Charles Booth's London Poverty Maps' presents the meticulously hand-coloured preparatory and final printed social mapping of London. Accompanying the colour-coded maps are selected reproductions of pages from the original notebooks, containing anecdotes related by Londoners of every trade, class, creed and nationality together with observations by Booth's interviewers that reveal much about their social class and moral views. An introduction by Mary S. Morgan clarifies the aims and methodology of Booth's survey, and six themed essays by experts in the field contextualize the survey's findings, illustrated by evocative period photographs.Completing the re-evaluation of Booth's seminal social survey are newly rendered infographics presenting the raw statistics relating to living conditions,employment status and poverty levels for each geographical section of London.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

In the late nineteenth century, Charles Booth's landmark social and economic survey found that 35 percent of Londoners were living in abject poverty. Booth's team of social investigators interviewed Londoners from all walks of life, recording their comments, together with their own unrestrained remarks and statistical information, in 450 notebooks. Their findings formed the basis of Booth's color-coded social mapping (from vicious and semi-criminal to wealthy) and his seventeen-volume survey Inquiry into the Life and Labour of the People of London, 1886-1903.Organized into six geographical sections, Charles Booth's London Poverty Maps presents the hand-colored preparatory and printed social mapping of London. Accompanying the maps are reproductions of pages from the original notebooks, containing anecdotes and observations too judgmental for Booth to include in his final published survey. An introduction by professor Mary S. Morgan clarifies the aims and methodology of Booth's survey and six themed essays contextualize the the survey's findings, accompanied by evocative period photographs.Providing insights into the minutia of everyday life viewed through the lens of inhabitants of every trade, class, creed, and nationality, Charles Booth's London Poverty Maps brings to life the diversity and dynamism of late nineteenth-century London.

In the late 19th century, Charles Booth's landmark social and economic survey found that 35% of Londoners were living in abject poverty. Between 1886 and 1903, Booth's team of social investigators interviewed Londoners from all walks of life, recording their comments, together with their own unrestrained remarks and statistical information, in 450 notebooks. Their findings formed the basis of Booth's colour-coded social mapping (from vicious and semi-criminal to wealthy) and his Inquiry into the Life and Labour of the People of London. 0Organized into 12 geographical sections, 'Charles Booth's London Poverty Maps' presents the meticulously hand-coloured preparatory and final printed social mapping of London. Accompanying the colour-coded maps are selected reproductions of pages from the original notebooks, containing anecdotes related by Londoners of every trade, class, creed and nationality together with observations by Booth's interviewers that reveal much about their social class and moral views. An introduction by Mary S. Morgan clarifies the aims and methodology of Booth's survey, and six themed essays by experts in the field contextualize the survey's findings, illustrated by evocative period photographs.Completing the re-evaluation of Booth's seminal social survey are newly rendered infographics presenting the raw statistics relating to living conditions,employment status and poverty levels for each geographical section of London.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Rescuing a cartographic achievement and pioneering sociological analysis from the virtual world of the internet, this richly illustrated and creatively designed publication transports readers back to London's streets at the end of the 19th century. Produced by a team at the London School of Economics (which is also responsible for an elegant website, https://booth.lse.ac.uk/map/, the book does not simply reproduce Booth's maps--which provided a cartographic record of the economic status of residents of London (revealing that 35 percent of the population lived in abject poverty)--but, through its design and essays, interrogates what it means to survey, classify, and record a living landscape. Reflecting the original publication's classification of poverty, the essays and illustrations consider housing, immigration, religion, trade, morality, and leisure and why these were the key elements of sociological classification. Laced throughout are references to ongoing debates: What does it mean to classify individuals and to collect data? How is one to understand the boundaries between the rich and the poor? Sociologists, historians, and geographers will be inspired by the work that went into the original 17-volume publication and this stellar demonstration of the work still being done on poverty. Encyclopedic in detail, this spectacular volume puts one directly on the streets of London circa 1899. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty and professionals; general readers. --Rebecca J. Bates, Berea College