Whanganuilibrary.com
Normal view MARC view ISBD view

An underground guide to sewers. or: Down, through and out in Paris, London, New York, &c. Stephen Halliday.

By: Halliday, Stephen.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Farnborough : Thames & Hudson Ltd. 2019Description: 256 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.Content type: text | still image | cartographic image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780500252352; 0500252351.Subject(s): Sewerage | Sewerage -- HistorySummary: Lose yourself in the vast sewer networks that lie beneath the world's great cities - past and present. Let detailed archival plans, maps and photographs guide you through these subterranean labyrinths - previously accessible only to their builders, engineers and, perhaps, the odd rogue explorer. This execrable exploration traces the evolution of waste management from the ingenious infra-structures of the ancient world to the seeping cesspits and festering open sewers of the medieval period. It investigates and celebrates the work of the civil engineers whose pioneering integrated sewer systems brought to a close the devastating cholera epidemics of the mid-19th century and continue to serve a vastly increased population today. And let's not forget those giant fatbergs clogging our underground arteries, or the storm-surge super-structures of tomorrow.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due
Non-Fiction Gonville Library
Non-Fiction
Non-Fiction 628.2 HAL Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Lose yourself in the vast sewer networks that lie beneath the world's great cities - past and present. Let detailed archival plans, maps and photographs guide you through these subterranean labyrinths - previously accessible only to their builders, engineers and, perhaps, the odd rogue explorer. This execrable exploration traces the evolution of waste management from the ingenious infra-structures of the ancient world to the seeping cesspits and festering open sewers of the medieval period. It investigates and celebrates the work of the civil engineers whose pioneering integrated sewer systems brought to a close the devastating cholera epidemics of the mid-19th century and continue to serve a vastly increased population today. And let's not forget those giant fatbergs clogging our underground arteries, or the storm-surge super-structures of tomorrow.

Lose yourself in the vast sewer networks that lie beneath the world's great cities - past and present. Let detailed archival plans, maps and photographs guide you through these subterranean labyrinths - previously accessible only to their builders, engineers and, perhaps, the odd rogue explorer. This execrable exploration traces the evolution of waste management from the ingenious infra-structures of the ancient world to the seeping cesspits and festering open sewers of the medieval period. It investigates and celebrates the work of the civil engineers whose pioneering integrated sewer systems brought to a close the devastating cholera epidemics of the mid-19th century and continue to serve a vastly increased population today. And let's not forget those giant fatbergs clogging our underground arteries, or the storm-surge super-structures of tomorrow.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Disposing of water and human waste has been a pressing concern since the formation of human societies. Engineering feats have shunted materials around, with varying degrees of success, for more than 3,000 years. Halliday (Water: A Turbulent History) showcases his deep knowledge of history and engineering, from the use of stone drains in ancient Pakistan to dams in Australia to today's anaerobic digester tanks and the low-cost OmniProcessor. Maps and photos abound, though captions are occasionally difficult to read. VERDICT Readers will never again flush a toilet without marveling at this miracle of convenience and sanitation. A quirky and delightful asset for most libraries.