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Women mean business : colonial businesswomen in New Zealand / Catherine Bishop.

By: Bishop, Catherine.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Dunedin, New Zealand : Otago University Press, 2019Description: 404 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.Content type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 1988531764; 9781988531762.Subject(s): Businesswomen -- New Zealand -- History -- 19th century | Women-owned business enterprises -- New Zealand -- History -- 19th century | Women -- New Zealand -- Social conditions -- 19th century | Small business -- New Zealand -- History -- 19th centurySummary: From Kaitaia in Northland to Oban on Stewart Island, New Zealand's nineteenth-century towns were full of entrepreneurial women. Contrary to what we might expect, colonial women were not only wives and mothers or domestic servants. A surprising number ran their own businesses, supporting themselves and their families, sometimes in productive partnership with husbands, but in other cases compensating for a spouse's incompetence, intemperance, absence - or all three. The pages of this book overflow with the stories of hard-working milliners and dressmakers, teachers, boarding-house keepers and laundresses, colourful publicans, brothelkeepers and travelling performers, along with the odd taxidermist, bootmaker and butcher - and Australasia's first woman chemist. Then, as now, there was no `typical' businesswoman. They were middle and working class; young and old; Ma ori and Pa keha ; single, married, widowed and sometimes bigamists. Their businesses could be wild successes or dismal failures, lasting just a few months or a lifetime. In this fascinating and entertaining book, award-winning historian Dr Catherine Bishop showcases many of the individual businesswomen whose efforts, collectively, contributed so much to the making of urban life in New Zealand.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due
Heritage & Archives Alexander Library | Te Rerenga Mai o Te Kauru
Heritage Collections
Reference - not for loan 650.1082 BIS Reference Only
Heritage & Archives Alexander Library | Te Rerenga Mai o Te Kauru
Heritage Collections
Reference - not for loan 650.1082 BIS Reference Only
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction (NEST)
Non-Fiction (NEST) 650.1082 BIS Available
Non-Fiction Hakeke Street Library
Non-Fiction
Non-Fiction 650.1082 BIS Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

From Kaitaia in Northland to Oban on Stewart Island, New Zealands nineteenth-century towns were full of entrepreneurial women. Contrary to what we might expect, colonial women were not only wives and mothers or domestic servants. A surprising number ran their own businesses, supporting themselves and their families, sometimes in productive partnership with husbands, but in other cases compensating for a spouses incompetence, intemperance, absence or all three. The pages of this book overflow with the stories of hard-working milliners and dressmakers, teachers, boarding-house keepers and laundresses, colourful publicans, brothelkeepers and travelling performers, along with the odd taxidermist, bootmaker and butcher and Australasias first woman chemist. Then, as now, there was no typical businesswoman. They were middle and working class; young and old; Māori and Pākehā single, married, widowed and sometimes bigamists. Their businesses could be wild successes or dismal failures, lasting just a few months or a lifetime. In this fascinating and entertaining book, award-winning historian Dr Catherine Bishop showcases many of the individual businesswomen whose efforts, collectively, contributed so much to the making of urban life in New Zealand.

From Kaitaia in Northland to Oban on Stewart Island, New Zealand's nineteenth-century towns were full of entrepreneurial women. Contrary to what we might expect, colonial women were not only wives and mothers or domestic servants. A surprising number ran their own businesses, supporting themselves and their families, sometimes in productive partnership with husbands, but in other cases compensating for a spouse's incompetence, intemperance, absence - or all three. The pages of this book overflow with the stories of hard-working milliners and dressmakers, teachers, boarding-house keepers and laundresses, colourful publicans, brothelkeepers and travelling performers, along with the odd taxidermist, bootmaker and butcher - and Australasia's first woman chemist. Then, as now, there was no `typical' businesswoman. They were middle and working class; young and old; Ma ori and Pa keha ; single, married, widowed and sometimes bigamists. Their businesses could be wild successes or dismal failures, lasting just a few months or a lifetime. In this fascinating and entertaining book, award-winning historian Dr Catherine Bishop showcases many of the individual businesswomen whose efforts, collectively, contributed so much to the making of urban life in New Zealand.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • 1 Don't Assume It's a Man: Finding colonial businesswomen (p. 8)
  • 2 Women's Place and Men's Responsibility (p. 34)
  • 3 'This Outlandish Place at the End of the Earth' (p. 48)
  • 4 One Ring to Bind Them All: Marriage and the law (p. 57)
  • 5 'Good Morning, Miss': The business of education (p. 71)
  • 6 A Stitch in Time: Dresses and drapery (p. 111)
  • 7 'Personal Offices for Man': Beds, booze and bodies (p. 162)
  • 8 'Personal Offices for Woman': A female economy (p. 205)
  • 9 The Corner Shop: For better or for worse (p. 226)
  • 10 Butchers and Bakers and Cordial Makers (p. 236)
  • 11 Pushing Boundaries: Exploiting 'accomplishments' (p. 261)
  • 12 Globetrotting (p. 275)
  • 13 Forgetting and Remembering (p. 293)
  • Abbreviations (p. 303)
  • Notes (p. 305)
  • Bibliography (p. 363)
  • Index (p. 383)