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The new childhood : raising kids to thrive in a connected world / Jordan Shapiro.

By: Shapiro, Jordan.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London, England : Yellow Kite, an imprint of Hodder & Stoughton, 2019Copyright date: ©2018Description: viii, 308 pages ; 22 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781529304657 (paperback).Subject(s): Technology and children | Internet and children | ParentingDDC classification: 004.678083 Summary: A provocative look at the new, digital landscape of childhood and how to navigate it. In The New Childhood, Jordan Shapiro provides a hopeful counterpoint to the fearful hand-wringing that has come to define our narrative around children and technology. Drawing on groundbreaking research in economics, psychology, philosophy, and education, The New Childhood shows how technology is guiding humanity toward a bright future in which our children will be able to create new, better models of global citizenship, connection, and community. Shapiro offers concrete, practical advice on how to parent and educate children effectively in a connected world, and provides tools and techniques for using technology to engage with kids and help them learn and grow. He compares this moment in time to other great technological revolutions in humanity's past and presents entertaining micro-histories of cultural fixtures: the sandbox, finger painting, the family dinner, and more. But most importantly, The New Childhood paints a timely, inspiring and positive picture of today's children, recognising that they are poised to create a progressive, diverse, meaningful, and hyper-connected world that today's adults can only barely imagine.
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Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Parenting Collection
Parenting Collection 649.1 SHA Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

IT'S TIME FOR A NEW APPROACH TO SCREEN TIME.

Jordan Shapiro believes we need to rethink parental attitudes to technology. There's a damaging orthodoxy that presents screen-time as the ultimate modern parenting evil and the only acceptable response to it is restriction. Shapiro, psychologist, educational pioneer and father of two, draws on cutting-edge research in education, philosophy, neuroscience and psychology to show we've let fear and nostalgia stand in the way of our children's best interests.

In his optimistic, inspiring and practical guide to the new, digital frontier of childhood, he reframes gaming, social media and smartphones to offer fresh, evidence-based advice on how to take a more progressive approach.

*Winner of the Spirituality & Practice Book Award as one of the 50 Best Spiritual Books of 2018.*

'Shapiro successfully transforms our worst fears about screen time into excitement about the potential for redesigning childhood around our latest technologies ... It's a necessary book that I urge you to read.' - The Telegraph

'Shapiro knows what he's talking about ... Shapiro's arguments are compelling' - USA Today

'a thought-provoking, bold read. As a father of two daughters at similar ages to Jordan's children (7 and 9), facing similar challenges and dilemmas, the book provided me with an inspiring and optimistic perspective that's rare in the current media landscape.' - Variety

'Timely, essential, and thought-provoking, The New Childhood is the must-read parenting guide for raising 21st century, digitally driven kids. Instead of raising a white flag and giving in to social media and the Internet, Jordan Shapiro tells parents how to embrace technology, stay involved in their children's lives, and prepare them for their future. Read it! I promise you'll rethink your parenting. I couldn't put it down' - Michele Borba, EdD, author of UnSelfie: Why Empathetic Kids Succeed In Our All-About-Me World

Includes bibliographical references (pages 295-301) and index.

A provocative look at the new, digital landscape of childhood and how to navigate it. In The New Childhood, Jordan Shapiro provides a hopeful counterpoint to the fearful hand-wringing that has come to define our narrative around children and technology. Drawing on groundbreaking research in economics, psychology, philosophy, and education, The New Childhood shows how technology is guiding humanity toward a bright future in which our children will be able to create new, better models of global citizenship, connection, and community. Shapiro offers concrete, practical advice on how to parent and educate children effectively in a connected world, and provides tools and techniques for using technology to engage with kids and help them learn and grow. He compares this moment in time to other great technological revolutions in humanity's past and presents entertaining micro-histories of cultural fixtures: the sandbox, finger painting, the family dinner, and more. But most importantly, The New Childhood paints a timely, inspiring and positive picture of today's children, recognising that they are poised to create a progressive, diverse, meaningful, and hyper-connected world that today's adults can only barely imagine.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Publishers Weekly Review

Shapiro, a coordinator of child development research at Sesame Workshop, presents a well-formulated, deeply insightful point of view on the place of technology in raising kids. Avoiding being either a Luddite or technology cheerleader, Shapiro explains that adults must still take responsibility for guiding child cognitive and social development, despite their possible discomfort at the "multidirectional, nonlinear intersection" of modern childhood and the digital world. His analysis places early-21st-century tools in the context of older concepts, showing how the game Minecraft promotes imaginative play and peer connection just as playing outside does, or how virtual locations can meaningfully and healthily provide public spaces. Shapiro works backward as well as forward, diving into the cultural history of older modes to show how they are not timeless but grounded in outdated ideas; notably, he argues the monastery-based model of school bells and quiet desks no longer matches the diversified attention required by modern workplaces. He admonishes parents and educators not to give technology "autonomy and credit," but to treat it as a helpful tool. Placing modern child-rearing in the context of the long story of human cultural adaptation, this manual makes the challenges of screens more approachable, and the adult role in meeting them clearer. (Dec.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Booklist Review

Worried that video games will ruin kids' minds? Stop. Shapiro, psychologist and father of 10- and 12-year-old boys, advocates for digital play. Video games are the new bedtime stories, the new fairy tales, the new mythology, perhaps even the new scripture, he says. Whew. In his view, people fear their own creations, from Frankenstein to the Terminator to new technologies. He encourages parents not to be like the troll beneath the footbridge, saying, When are you going to grow up and stop staring at screens all day? He sees the glass as half full, with gamers cultivating social skills during thumb play. And he urges parents to resist tut-tutting and, instead, ask questions about the games and talk about everything from their soundtracks to the developers who decide how avatars jump, run, and shoot. Skeptics may be less than bullish about his rosy view of the "New Childhood." Still, they will find much food for thought about how video games may unite people even if they live largely in the equivalent of a digital gated community.--Karen Springen Copyright 2018 Booklist

Kirkus Book Review

Why screen time might not be so detrimental to your child's health. With the rise of the internet and smartphones, humans entered an era of extreme connectivity via invisible threads around the globe. Children born during this time know no other life and readily accept and adapt to the latest changes in software and technology. Shapiro (Intellectual Heritage/Temple Univ.; Freeplay: A Video Game Guide to Maximum Euphoric Bliss, 2013, etc.) believes the connections children make over the internet are similar to those previously made on the playground or in the sandbox. Children are learning similar social and relationship skills in digital space, just as they once did face to face. The author claims the amount of time he spends playing video games with his sons is akin to the days when dads played ball with their children; in both cases, they are bonding on the child's level. Playing video games with other children around the world enhances a child's sense of self and their place in it while building social interactions in the safe environment of the child's own home. Shapiro argues that parents and educators should let go of their own fears about technology and embrace and endorse it, letting children develop their skills via these tools. He believes that in this new paradigm, adults must let go of their memories of their own childhoods and let their children create memories using the technology at hand. The author's arguments are persuasive and bolstered by research. Yet his theories may be difficult to swallow for those still inclined to believe that active outdoor play with real children in real time and space is a more productive way to learn acceptable social behaviors and develop relationships than sitting alone in front of a computer screen. Credible theories backed by solid research that show technology is possibly less harmful than originally thought to children who use it on a regular basis. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.