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Kauri : witness to a nation's history / Joanna Orwin.

By: Orwin, Joanna.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Auckland, N.Z. : New Holland, 2004Description: 208 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some color), maps ; 23 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 1869660374; 9781869660376.Subject(s): Kauri -- New Zealand | Forests and forestry -- Social aspects -- New Zealand -- History | Forests and forestry -- Social aspects | Kauri | New Zealand | Forests and forestry - Social aspects - New Zealand - History | Kauri - New ZealandGenre/Form: History.DDC classification: 634.975920993
Contents:
1. Father of the forest -- te matua o te wao. Kauri in the Maori world -- 2. Legends in the landscape. How and where Kauri grow -- 3. The first spar seekers. Early European and Maori contacts -- 4. Ship and shore stations. Establishment of the timber trade, 1810-1840 -- 5. Hinterland and harbour. Expansion of the timber industry, 1840-1920 -- 6. Capitalising on kauri. Colonial politics, Auckland, and the kauri trade, 1840s-1920s -- 7. Gum spear, spade, and scraper. Life on the gum-fields, 1830s-1930s -- 8. The cutting edge. Peak and decline of the kauri timber industry, 1900-1940 -- 9. Turn of the tide. Rise of the conservation movement -- 10. Habitat and heritage. Into the twenty-first century.
Summary: This recent history of NZ's magnificent Kauri tree and its contribution to early settlement covers the botany of the species and its importance to the industrial and economic foundations of the nation. Apart from whales and seals, the Kauri tree was to provide the first major export commodity for the colony. This stemmed from the discovery of the value of its timber for spars, shipbuilding and eventually buildings throughout NZ, as well as a masssive lumber export trade. This is a history with a difference, covering botanical aspects, the first uses of its timber, its importance to pioneers and its traditional uses and mylogical recognition by the Maori people. Also, how this once vast resource throughout the area to the north of Auckland was reduced to the tree surviving mainly in a few reserves preserving some of the largest of these giant and iconic trees. Joanna Orwin's book can be regarded as a study in social history too, ecompassing its uses as a timber, then the exploitation of its by-product Kauri gum, which employed many diggers, both Maori and European and particularly the people from Dalmatia who remain prominant in the Northland community. By the 1940s the forests of the North reached a point of near extinction and the gum fields were largely replaced by farmlands. A campaign to save the last remnants of the Kauri forest was successful, but only a tiny remnant remained. The author has presented the story of the Kauri, its boom and bust days, its economic contribution to the new nation, is influences on people, places and poulations, in a readable and informative way. In some aspects the Kauri story parallels the gold-rush days of Otago and has the same threads of exitement, endeavour, hardship and pioneering.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

One of the largest trees in the world, the kauri is a natural wonder and a New Zealand icon. Its immense trunk has supplied timber for every conceivable use from Maori war canoes to modern European homes. Along the way, the industries that sprang up around it shaped national culture in ways that still echo today. Today the last remaining stands of kauri forest are preserved carefully, a must-see for locals and visitors alike. From commodity for exploitation to object of awe, the kauri and its story lie at the heart of New Zealand's own story, which is vividly brought to life in Joanna Orsin's book. 'Kauri: Witness to a Nation's History' takes us back to the tree's ancient originals. We read about Maori myth surrounding the tree, and about the white-skinned mariners who sailed up to harvest timber for their own 'giant birds': the great naval ships of Europe. The tree's presence looms over the colonial period and beyond, and is the very stuff from which the flagpoles at Waitangi were carved (as well as some of the country's fines architectual treasures and modern works of art).The book charts the growth of the conservation movement, and presents the modern-day issues that affect the tree, such as Maori guardianship and tourism versus protection.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 201-204) and index.

1. Father of the forest -- te matua o te wao. Kauri in the Maori world -- 2. Legends in the landscape. How and where Kauri grow -- 3. The first spar seekers. Early European and Maori contacts -- 4. Ship and shore stations. Establishment of the timber trade, 1810-1840 -- 5. Hinterland and harbour. Expansion of the timber industry, 1840-1920 -- 6. Capitalising on kauri. Colonial politics, Auckland, and the kauri trade, 1840s-1920s -- 7. Gum spear, spade, and scraper. Life on the gum-fields, 1830s-1930s -- 8. The cutting edge. Peak and decline of the kauri timber industry, 1900-1940 -- 9. Turn of the tide. Rise of the conservation movement -- 10. Habitat and heritage. Into the twenty-first century.

This recent history of NZ's magnificent Kauri tree and its contribution to early settlement covers the botany of the species and its importance to the industrial and economic foundations of the nation. Apart from whales and seals, the Kauri tree was to provide the first major export commodity for the colony. This stemmed from the discovery of the value of its timber for spars, shipbuilding and eventually buildings throughout NZ, as well as a masssive lumber export trade. This is a history with a difference, covering botanical aspects, the first uses of its timber, its importance to pioneers and its traditional uses and mylogical recognition by the Maori people. Also, how this once vast resource throughout the area to the north of Auckland was reduced to the tree surviving mainly in a few reserves preserving some of the largest of these giant and iconic trees. Joanna Orwin's book can be regarded as a study in social history too, ecompassing its uses as a timber, then the exploitation of its by-product Kauri gum, which employed many diggers, both Maori and European and particularly the people from Dalmatia who remain prominant in the Northland community. By the 1940s the forests of the North reached a point of near extinction and the gum fields were largely replaced by farmlands. A campaign to save the last remnants of the Kauri forest was successful, but only a tiny remnant remained. The author has presented the story of the Kauri, its boom and bust days, its economic contribution to the new nation, is influences on people, places and poulations, in a readable and informative way. In some aspects the Kauri story parallels the gold-rush days of Otago and has the same threads of exitement, endeavour, hardship and pioneering.