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The spy in Moscow Station : a counterspy's hunt for a deadly cold war threat.

By: Haseltine, Eric.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: [Place of publication not identified], ICON Books LTD, 2019Description: 1 volume ; 22 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 1785784927; 9781785784927.Subject(s): Soviet Union. Komitet gosudarstvenno�i bezopasnosti -- History | Espionage, Soviet -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Secret service -- Soviet Union -- History -- 20th century | Cold War | Soviet Union. Komitet gosudarstvenno�i bezopasnosti | Cold War (1945-1989) | Espionage, Soviet | Secret service | Soviet Union | United States | 1900-1999Genre/Form: History.DDC classification: 327.12470730904
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction
Non-Fiction 327.12470730904 Coming Soon

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Moscow in the late 1970s: one by one, CIA assets are disappearing. The perils of American arrogance, mixed withbureaucratic infighting, had left the country unspeakably vulnerable toultra-sophisticated Russian electronic surveillance.. The Spy in Moscow Station tells of a time when--much like today--Russian spycraft wasproving itself far ahead of the best technology the U.S. had to offer.

This is the true story of unorthodox, underdog intelligence officers whofought an uphill battle against their government to prove that the KGB hadpulled off the most devastating and breathtakingly thorough penetration of U.S.national security in history.

Incorporating declassified internal CIA memos anddiplomatic cables, this suspenseful narrative reads like a thriller--but reallives were at stake, and every twist is true as the US and USSR attempt towrongfoot each other in eavesdropping technology and tradecraft. The book alsocarries a chilling warning for the present: like the State and CIA officers whowere certain their "sweeps" could detect any threat in Moscow, wedon't know what we don't know.