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Is medicine still good for us? A primer for the 21st century. Julian Sheather.

By: Sheather, Julian.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: The Big Idea: Publisher: Farnborough : Thames & Hudson Ltd. 2019Description: 144 p.ISBN: 9780500294581; 0500294585.Subject(s): MEDICAL / GeneralDDC classification: 190 Summary: Modern medicine is exceptionally powerful, and has achieved unprecedented successes. But it comes at a price; individuals suffer from medicine's failures, and the economic costs of medicine are now stratospheric. Have we got the balance wrong? 0'Is Medicine Still Good For Us?' sets out the facts about our medical establishments in a clear, engaging style, interrogating the ethics of modern practices and the impact they have on all our lives.
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Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

This fascinating entry in The Big Idea series lays out the ethical implications and the costs of modern medicine.

Over the course of human history, medicine has achieved incredible successes--but at what cost? This latest book in The Big Idea series explores the state of modern medicine, examining the ethics of medical and healthcare practices and the impact they have on modern life. This fascinating analysis engages with the debate surrounding the escalating costs, both financial and ethical, of medicine today. Intelligent and provocative, Is Medicine Still Good for Us? dissects common assumptions about medicine, helping the reader create their own informed opinion about its extraordinary achievements, limitations, injustices, and inevitable failures.

Dr. Julian Sheather, an ethics adviser to Doctors Without Borders, contextualizes medicine as a science, art, institution, and ideology, outlining the pros and cons of what medicine has become in the signature Big Idea textual approach. Accompanying Sheather's text are numerous informative illustrations that deepen the reader's understanding of the material.

A timely addition to the series, this book will engage those who love to debate, who are interested in ethics and philosophy, and those working in the medical field.

Modern medicine is exceptionally powerful, and has achieved unprecedented successes. But it comes at a price; individuals suffer from medicine's failures, and the economic costs of medicine are now stratospheric. Have we got the balance wrong? 0'Is Medicine Still Good For Us?' sets out the facts about our medical establishments in a clear, engaging style, interrogating the ethics of modern practices and the impact they have on all our lives.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Introduction (p. 6)
  • 1 The Development of Medicine (p. 18)
  • 2 How Effective is Medicine? (p. 50)
  • 3 The Medicalization of Living and Dying (p. 74)
  • 4 Why Modern Medicine Needs to Change (p. 100)
  • Conclusion (p. 128)
  • Further Reading (p. 136)
  • Picture Credits (p. 138)
  • Index (p. 140)
  • Acknowledgments (p. 144)

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This book focuses on the impact of modern medicine on society and human life, arguing that the benefits of current practices no longer outweigh associated negatives. The book cites overmedicalization and the commercialization of medicine as causes of such things as the opioid epidemic, drug-resistant bacteria, and obesity. While the content is compelling, the book's unique layout and organization make it hard to take seriously. The book uses what it calls "quick-recognition text hierarchy," which means that paragraphs are prioritized by size: the larger the font size, the more important the concepts. While intended as an aid to the reader, it is distracting and gives the appearance of a diatribe, not a credible source. Additionally, while the book does have a useful further reading section, it lacks any references for the numerous statistics and studies it mentions. Overall, the book is not recommended for an academic setting, but could be of interest to a public library. Summing Up: Recommended. General readers only. --Carissa A. Tomlinson, University of Minnesota