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Bats : an illustrated guide to all species / Marianne Taylor ; Merlin D. Tuttle, science editor and photographer.

By: Taylor, Marianne, 1972-.
Contributor(s): Tuttle, Merlin D [editor,, photographer.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London, England : Ivy Press, 2019Description: 400 pages : colour illustrations ; 25 cm.Content type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 1782405577; 9781782405573.Subject(s): Bats | Bats -- IdentificationDDC classification: 599.4 Summary: From the Giant Golden Crowned Flying Fox, a megabat with a wingspan of over five feet, to the aptly named Bumblebee Bat, the world's smallest mammal, the number and diversity of bat species is proving to be very rich and vastly underestimated. Nocturnal, fast-flying, and secretive, their behaviors are extremely difficult to observe and catalog. This lavishly illustrated handbook offers in-depth profiles of 300 megabats and microbats and detailed summaries of all the species identified to date. An endlessly fascinating guide with a hefty introduction exploring their natural history and unique adaptations to life on the wing, Bats includes close-up images of these animals' delicate, intricate and sometimes grotesque forms and faces, each shaped by evolution to meet the demands of an extraordinarily specialized life.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction (NEST)
Non-Fiction (NEST) 599.4 TAY Checked out 05/10/2019

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

"Meshing deft scientific text with Tuttle's sumptuous images, it's a superb introduction to the baroque morphologies and flying prowess of these beguiling beasts." - Nature

Bats: An Illustrated Guide to All Species looks in detail at the more than 1,300 species known today. Nocturnal, fast-flying and secretive, they are endlessly fascinating, yet extremely difficult to observe and catalogue. The diversity of bats is both rich and underestimated and the threats they face from humans are very real. This guide illuminates the world of bats and reveals their true nature as intelligent, social and deeply misunderstood creatures.

This extravagantly illustrated handbook features the work of famed nature photographer Merlin D. Tuttle and in-depth profiles of 288 bats, from the Large Flying Fox, which has a wingspan of more than five feet, to the Bumblebee Bat, contender for the world's smallest mammal. Bats includes close-up images of these animals' delicate and intricate forms and faces, each shaped by evolution to meet the demands of an extraordinarily specialized life, and a thorough introduction which explores their natural history and unique adaptations to life on the wing.

From the Giant Golden Crowned Flying Fox, a megabat with a wingspan of over five feet, to the aptly named Bumblebee Bat, the world's smallest mammal, the number and diversity of bat species is proving to be very rich and vastly underestimated. Nocturnal, fast-flying, and secretive, their behaviors are extremely difficult to observe and catalog. This lavishly illustrated handbook offers in-depth profiles of 300 megabats and microbats and detailed summaries of all the species identified to date. An endlessly fascinating guide with a hefty introduction exploring their natural history and unique adaptations to life on the wing, Bats includes close-up images of these animals' delicate, intricate and sometimes grotesque forms and faces, each shaped by evolution to meet the demands of an extraordinarily specialized life.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Bats make up about 20 percent of the world's mammals, but the challenges of studying such small, fast-flying, nocturnal animals mean that our knowledge about them is incomplete. Technological advances in field and lab research have increased our understanding, reflected in this spectacular volume from Taylor (The Way of the Hare). The precise text and lush, extravagant photographs from Tuttle (The Secret Lives of Bats) offer a compelling combination. A concise introduction explores evolution, diversity, biology, behavior, ecology, and the bats/people connection. Brief profiles of 1,386 known species, arranged taxonomically, comprise the second section and detail the distribution, conservation status, physical traits, habitat, and behavior of various kinds of bats. Mostly color and full-page photographs show the creatures doing their beneficial things: on the wing chasing insects, pollinating flowers, or aiding in seed dispersal. These animals astonish even in repose, especially when "sitting" for one of Tuttle's facial portraits or roosting en masse. Indexes provide access by scientific and common bat names, but one might wish for an easier way to pinpoint local species, such as an additional "distribution table." VERDICT Going far beyond the practical value of a guidebook, this is an important update to bat literature and one to savor, containing a wonder on nearly every page and proving that bats are indeed "intelligent, curious, comical, even essential animals."-Robert Eagan, Windsor P.L., Ont. © Copyright 2019. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

With more than 1,300 known species, bats represent the second most diverse order of mammals. Only the rodents are more speciose. Following a general discussion of chiropteran biology, the authors provide a broad overview of the various families and associated genera of bats. These are divided into the two currently recognized suborders, Yangochiroptera and Yinpterochiroptera, and arranged alphabetically by family. Each family/generic section includes a respective list of species (and geographic range) and a brief description of the natural history of select species. A total of 288 representative species are described and accompanied by high-quality, full-color photography, a thumbnail distribution map, and conservation status. Two separate indexes, one of common names and one of scientific names, is helpful; however, the book would have benefited from a listing of species by even broad geographic boundaries. Readers interested in the bats of a particular region must thumb through the species accounts and distribution maps page by page. The book is written in a clear, conversational style, and will be of interest to general readers wishing to learn more about the diversity of this intriguing and unique group of animals. Summing Up: Recommended. General readers. --Danny A. Brass, independent scholar

Booklist Review

This thorough introduction to the world of bats begins with an overview that covers topics such as research, evolution, behavior, and ecology. Then over 1,300 species of bats are profiled in entries arranged by taxonomic order and covering distribution, habitat, behavior, and conservation status. An overview of each family as a whole precedes the individual profiles of each species. Each individual species entry is accompanied by a photograph. The book concludes with an index of scientific names and an index of common names. Taylor (Owls, 2012) and photographer Merlin Tuttle's dedication to the species shines through on every page. This comprehensive, clear, and concise guide is sure to appeal to any armchair enthusiast or researcher with an interest in the topic.--Maren Ostergard Copyright 2019 Booklist