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West Island : five twentieth-century New Zealanders in Australia / Stephanie Johnson.

By: Johnson, Stephanie.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Dunedin, New Zealand : Otago University Press , 2019Description: 284 pages : illustrations (some colour) ; 23 cm.Content type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781988531571; 1988531578.Subject(s): Wakelin, Roland, 1887-1971 | Deamer, Dulcie, 1890-1972 | Baume, Eric, 1900-1967 | Devanny, Jean, 1894-1962 | Stewart, Douglas, 1913-1985 | New Zealanders -- Australia -- BiographyGenre/Form: Biographies.DDC classification: 920.094 Summary: Five notable twentieth-century New Zealanders who made their lives in Australia are the subject of this fascinating biographical investigation by award-winning author Stephanie Johnson. Roland Wakelin, Dulcie Deamer, Jean Devanny, Douglas Stewart and Eric Baume had little in common in personality, proclivities and politics. Yet they all experienced fame and/or notoriety in the West Island while being largely forgotten in their country of origin. They also occasionally crossed paths in the course of eventful lives. The works of painter Roland Wakelin place him as a founder of Australias Modern Movement, while his modest and affable personality was the opposite of the stereotypical artist. Dulcie Deamer was a writer and libertine known for her leopardskin attire and associations with the larger-than-life characters of the Sydney bohemian set including the Witch of Kings Cross, fellow New Zealander Rosaleen Norton. The forthright feminism and creative integrity of novelist Jean Devanny led to bitter battles with the same communist movement she devoted decades of her life to. Douglas Stewart was one of the most famous Australian writers of his period. He was a long- term gatekeeper for Australian letters as the literary editor of the Bulletin, and then editor for publishers Angus and Robertson. Born into an unusual and unorthodox Jewish family, Eric Baume gained prominence in Australia as an early prototype of the modern- day shock jock and at one stage one of the countrys highest-earning media personalities and bestselling authors. A lifelong gambling addict, he died in debt. Stephanie Johnson restores these striking New Zealanders to our national narrative, engaging their life stories to illuminate the curious lacuna that exists at the heart of the complex relationship between the two nations. As a writer with strong connections to both countries, Johnson draws on her own experiences of life on both sides of the ditch in her reflections on the trans-Tasman diaspora and the subtle differences and cultural divide that set apart the two countries.
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Biographies Davis (Central) Library
Biographies
Biographies B JOH Checked out 01/08/2019

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Five notable twentieth-century New Zealanders who made their lives in Australia are the subject of this fascinating biographical investigation by award-winning author Stephanie Johnson.Roland Wakelin, Dulcie Deamer, Jean Devanny, Douglas Stewart and Eric Baume had little in common in personality, proclivities and politics. Yet they all experienced fame and/or notoriety in the 'West Island' while being largely forgotten in their country of origin. They also occasionally crossed paths in the course of eventful lives.The works of painter Roland Wakelin place him as a founder of Australia's Modern Movement, while his modest and affable personality was the opposite of the stereotypical artist. Dulcie Deamer was a writer and libertine known for her leopardskin attire and associations with the larger-than-life characters of the Sydney bohemian set - including the 'Witch of Kings Cross', fellow New Zealander Rosaleen Norton. The forthright feminism and creative integrity of novelist Jean Devanny led to bitter battles with the same communist movement she devoted decades of her life to. Douglas Stewart was one of the most famous 'Australian' writers of his period. He was a long- term gatekeeper for Australian letters as the literary editor of the Bulletin, and then editor for publishers Angus and Robertson. Born into an unusual and unorthodox Jewish family, Eric Baume gained prominence in Australia as an early prototype of the modern- day 'shock jock' and at one stage one of the country's highest-earning media personalities and bestselling authors. A lifelong gambling addict, he died in debt.Stephanie Johnson restores these striking New Zealanders to our national narrative, engaging their life stories to illuminate the curious lacuna that exists at the heart of the complex relationship between the two nations.As a writer with strong connections to both countries, Johnson draws on her own experiences of life on both sides of 'the ditch' in her reflections on the trans-Tasman diaspora and the subtle differences and cultural divide that set apart the two countries.

Five notable twentieth-century New Zealanders who made their lives in Australia are the subject of this fascinating biographical investigation by award-winning author Stephanie Johnson. Roland Wakelin, Dulcie Deamer, Jean Devanny, Douglas Stewart and Eric Baume had little in common in personality, proclivities and politics. Yet they all experienced fame and/or notoriety in the West Island while being largely forgotten in their country of origin. They also occasionally crossed paths in the course of eventful lives. The works of painter Roland Wakelin place him as a founder of Australias Modern Movement, while his modest and affable personality was the opposite of the stereotypical artist. Dulcie Deamer was a writer and libertine known for her leopardskin attire and associations with the larger-than-life characters of the Sydney bohemian set including the Witch of Kings Cross, fellow New Zealander Rosaleen Norton. The forthright feminism and creative integrity of novelist Jean Devanny led to bitter battles with the same communist movement she devoted decades of her life to. Douglas Stewart was one of the most famous Australian writers of his period. He was a long- term gatekeeper for Australian letters as the literary editor of the Bulletin, and then editor for publishers Angus and Robertson. Born into an unusual and unorthodox Jewish family, Eric Baume gained prominence in Australia as an early prototype of the modern- day shock jock and at one stage one of the countrys highest-earning media personalities and bestselling authors. A lifelong gambling addict, he died in debt. Stephanie Johnson restores these striking New Zealanders to our national narrative, engaging their life stories to illuminate the curious lacuna that exists at the heart of the complex relationship between the two nations. As a writer with strong connections to both countries, Johnson draws on her own experiences of life on both sides of the ditch in her reflections on the trans-Tasman diaspora and the subtle differences and cultural divide that set apart the two countries.