Whanganuilibrary.com
Normal view MARC view ISBD view

The book of ingeniously daring chemistry / Sean Connolly ; cover and interior illustrations by Cara Bean.

By: Connolly, Sean, 1956- [author.].
Contributor(s): Bean, Cara [illustrator.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Irresponsible Science: Publisher: New York : Workman Publishing, [2018]Copyright date: �2018Description: xiii, 241 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780761180104; 0761180109.Other title: Ingeniously daring chemistry.Subject(s): Chemistry -- Experiments -- Juvenile literature | Periodic table of the elements -- Juvenile literature | Chemistry -- Experiments | Periodic table of the elements | Experiments | JUVENILE NONFICTION / Science & Nature / Chemistry | JUVENILE NONFICTION / Science & Nature / Earth Sciences / Rocks & Minerals | JUVENILE NONFICTION / Science & Nature / Experiments & Projects | Chemistry -- Experiments | Periodic table of the elements | Chemistry -- Experiments -- Juvenile literature | Periodic table of the elements -- Juvenile literatureGenre/Form: Nonfiction. | Juvenile works.DDC classification: 542 C
Contents:
Hydrogen : Get to Know an Atom -- Helium : Hey, Cool It! -- Boron : A Star Is Boron -- Carbon : Good Conduct Award -- Nitrogen : Fixin' to Use Some Nitrogen -- Oxygen : Global Cooling - On the Trail of Cavendish -- Fluorine : Try the Fluorine Tooth Test -- Neon : Even Neon Gets Excited -- Sodium : Hot Ice -- Magnesium : Trick Birthday Candles - Crackpot Crystals -- Aluminum : Curses---Foiled Again! -- Silicon : Don't Sand So Close to Me - Fast-Track Fossils -- Phosphorus : Playing Cat Detective -- Sulfur : Save That Silver! -- Chlorine : "I'll Have an Egg Float" -- Calcium : Not Such a Softie -- Iron : Burning Iron -- Copper : May the Force Be with You -- Zinc : Did You Wind the Potato Clock? -- Tin : Is That a Tin "Tin Can"? -- Arsenic ; Strontium; Cadmium; Cesium; Mercury; Lead; Polonium; Radon; Francium; Radium; Uranium; Plutonium.
Hydrogen -- Helium -- Boron -- Carbon -- Nitrogen -- Oxygen -- Fluorine -- Neon -- Sodium -- Magnesium -- Aluminum -- Silicon -- Phosphorus -- Sulfur -- Chlorine -- Calcium -- Iron -- Copper -- Zinc -- Tin -- The "dirty dozen". Arsenic ; Strontium ; Cadmium ; Cesium ; Mercury ; Lead ; Polonium ; Radon ; Francium ; Radium ; Uranium ; Plutonium.
Summary: Twenty-four eye-opening chemistry experiments that take readers on an interactive journey through the periodic table of elements. Includes glossary.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction
Non-Fiction 542 C Coming Soon

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Journey through the periodic table of elements - all you need is some adrenaline-pumping curiosity, a sense of adventure, and a well-stocked pantry!

From Sean Connolly, the master of messy and dangerous science books - which together have 615,000 copies in print - comes an introduction to chemistry for kids age 9 and up, a perfect addition to his STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) titles. Each fully illustrated chapter focuses on a single element--first describing its properties, how it was discovered, and even its potential danger level. Then easy-to-follow experiments help readers put their newfound knowledge into action by using everyday household ingredients such as light bulbs, eggs, and fridge magnets.

Sodium: Make "hot ice" by crystallising vinegar and baking soda into sodium acetate.

Neon: See how this gas emits light by powering a light bulb with static electricity.

Iron: Submerge steel wool in vinegar to see how this metal oxidises.

And phosphorus : Play cat detective by using ultraviolet light to locate bad cat smells! Elements are the building blocks of our world - and The Book of Ingeniously Daring Chemistry is a building block to our understanding them.

Hydrogen : Get to Know an Atom -- Helium : Hey, Cool It! -- Boron : A Star Is Boron -- Carbon : Good Conduct Award -- Nitrogen : Fixin' to Use Some Nitrogen -- Oxygen : Global Cooling - On the Trail of Cavendish -- Fluorine : Try the Fluorine Tooth Test -- Neon : Even Neon Gets Excited -- Sodium : Hot Ice -- Magnesium : Trick Birthday Candles - Crackpot Crystals -- Aluminum : Curses---Foiled Again! -- Silicon : Don't Sand So Close to Me - Fast-Track Fossils -- Phosphorus : Playing Cat Detective -- Sulfur : Save That Silver! -- Chlorine : "I'll Have an Egg Float" -- Calcium : Not Such a Softie -- Iron : Burning Iron -- Copper : May the Force Be with You -- Zinc : Did You Wind the Potato Clock? -- Tin : Is That a Tin "Tin Can"? -- Bonus Activity: Because You're Worth It : "DIRTY DOZEN" Arsenic ; Strontium; Cadmium; Cesium; Mercury; Lead; Polonium; Radon; Francium; Radium; Uranium; Plutonium.

Hydrogen -- Helium -- Boron -- Carbon -- Nitrogen -- Oxygen -- Fluorine -- Neon -- Sodium -- Magnesium -- Aluminum -- Silicon -- Phosphorus -- Sulfur -- Chlorine -- Calcium -- Iron -- Copper -- Zinc -- Tin -- The "dirty dozen". Arsenic ; Strontium ; Cadmium ; Cesium ; Mercury ; Lead ; Polonium ; Radon ; Francium ; Radium ; Uranium ; Plutonium.

For ages 9 and up.

Twenty-four eye-opening chemistry experiments that take readers on an interactive journey through the periodic table of elements. Includes glossary.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Publishers Weekly Review

This substantial chemistry primer (following The Book of Totally Irresponsible Science) explores complex concepts in an approachable, graphics-laden format. Connolly's first 20 chapters focus on a single element per section-discussing each element's discovery and attributes, and concluding with an experiment. Later chapters round up the "Dirty Dozen," denoting elements too dangerous for experimentation. Connolly writes with light humor that serves to spark readers' natural curiosity: "Red phosphorous is the most common form of the element, and it is the only phosphorus that you'll ever come across-unless you're really unlucky." The experiments are accessible and intriguing: "Playing Cat Detective" invites readers to use a black lightbulb to detect cat urine (it contains phosphorus, which glows under ultraviolet light, Connolly explains). Charts and sidebars offer visual variety to weightier sections of text, and playful illustrations anthropomorphize the elements (hydrogen resembles a bearded wizard). This is a lively, hands-on introduction to chemistry. Ages 9-up. (Nov.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Booklist Review

The author of several science experiment books, including The Book of Wildly Spectacular Sports Science (2016), Connolly turns his entertaining, conversational style to chemistry. From hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen to aluminum, chlorine, and zinc, the first 20 chapters each highlight a readily available element. Each profile comprises element basics (e.g., atomic number, symbol, melting point, etc.), an overview, descriptions of what it looks like, how it was discovered, and where it's used in everyday life. A Meet the Relatives section looks at related elements and how they compare and contrast, while a culminating experiment (requiring easy-to-find items) lets young scientists examine the elements for themselves by making crystals, hot ice, magic sand, potato clocks, and more. The concluding section gives short snapshots of 12 deadly elements, such as mercury, lead, and uranium. Keeping the text lively throughout are comics-style illustrations, photographs, danger levels for each element, and sidebars with interesting stories (e.g., the theory that Napoleon died from arsenic poisoning). Pair with the young readers edition of Sam Kean's The Disappearing Spoon (2018) for more periodic fun.--Angela Leeper Copyright 2018 Booklist

Horn Book Review

Each of twenty familiar elements (helium, carbon, sodium, etc.) is explored in a chapter offering detailed information on its characteristics, discovery, uses, and relationships to other elements represented in the periodic table. Sidebars introduce additional general chemistry concepts, and appropriate activities allow readers to experiment. The final chapter covers a "Dirty Dozen" elements deadly to humans. Cartoonlike illustrations and a chipper narrative voice lighten the book's tone. Glos. (c) Copyright 2019. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Kirkus Book Review

A highlights reel of the periodic table of elements, with 24 experiments and demonstrations.Connolly (The Book of Potentially Catastrophic Science, 2010, etc.) focuses on 20 of the table's common "key players," providing for each accounts of its historic discovery, how it bonds or otherwise behaves with other substances, common uses, quick snapshots of neighboring elements, and one or two experiments. These last are the weakest link, as, for instance, the author simply instructs budding chemists to buy trick birthday candles rather than try to make them, pulls a bait and switch with a project for neon that uses a fluorescent bulb ("Sure, it's filled with a different gasbut the experiment gets the same result"), and, thanks to garbled instructions, leaves the circuit unclosed in a supposed demonstration of graphite's electrical conductivity. In her very simple cartoon illustrations Bean doesn't always pick up the slack (placing the wire and nail in a potato "battery" close together rather than, as the instructions specify, as far apart as possible) but does at least portray a diverse cast of young makers along with decorative historical and fanciful images. Otherwise, the author further punches up a set of colorfully delivered tales of discovery with plenty of side notes on hazardous products and isotopes, capped by a closing rogues' gallery of particularly dangerous elements, and also offers lucid pictures of chemical processes and how the periodic table is organized.Fresh and informal but stronger on background than hands-on experiences. (glossary) (Nonfiction. 10-13) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.