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Gardens of the arts & crafts movement / Judith B. Tankard.

By: Tankard, Judith B.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Portland, Oregon : Timber Press, 2018Copyright date: ©2018Edition: Revised edition.Description: 298 pages : colour illustrations ; 26 cm.Content type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781604698206; 1604698209.Other title: Gardens of the arts and crafts movement.Subject(s): Arts and crafts gardens | Arts and crafts gardens -- United States | Arts and crafts gardens -- England | Arts and crafts movement | Arts and crafts movement -- United States | Arts and crafts movement -- EnglandSummary: "In this thoroughly revised edition of "Gardens of the arts and crafts movement", landscape scholar Judith B. Tankard surveys the inspirations, characteristics, and development of garden design during the movement. Tankard presents a selection of houses and gardens of the era from Great Britain and the United States, with an emphasis on the diversity of designers who helped forge a truly distinct approach to garden design. A visual feast of nearly 300 illustrations and photographs, it is an essential resource for designers and gardeners interested in this iconic era"-- Jacket.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

"The ever-alluring Arts and Crafts garden...is profoundly relevant to our 21st-century needs." --Sam Watters, author of Gardens for a Beautiful America

In Gardens of the Arts and Crafts Movement , landscape scholar Judith B. Tankard surveys the inspirations, characteristics, and development of garden design during this iconic movement. Tankard presents a selection of houses and gardens of the era from Great Britain and North America. With almost 300 illustrations and photographs, and an emphasis on the diversity of designers who helped forge the movement, Gardens of the Arts and Crafts Movement is an essential resource for this truly distinct approach to garden design.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 279-289) and index.

"In this thoroughly revised edition of "Gardens of the arts and crafts movement", landscape scholar Judith B. Tankard surveys the inspirations, characteristics, and development of garden design during the movement. Tankard presents a selection of houses and gardens of the era from Great Britain and the United States, with an emphasis on the diversity of designers who helped forge a truly distinct approach to garden design. A visual feast of nearly 300 illustrations and photographs, it is an essential resource for designers and gardeners interested in this iconic era"-- Jacket.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Preface (p. 7)
  • Introduction (p. 11)
  • Chapter 1 Gardens Old and New (p. 19)
  • Chapter 2 William Morris's Earthly Paradise (p. 39)
  • Chapter 3 The Lure of the Cotswolds (p. 53)
  • Chapter 4 Architectural Gardening (p. 73)
  • Chapter 5 Individuality and Imagination (p. 89)
  • Chapter 6 The Art and Craft of Garden Making (p. 107)
  • Chapter 7 At Home with Two Master Gardeners (p. 123)
  • Chapter 8 A Perfect House and Garden (p. 141)
  • Chapter 9 Beyond the Borders (p. 159)
  • Chapter 10 Craftsman Style (p. 177)
  • Chapter 11 Beautiful Gardens in America (p. 195)
  • Chapter 12 Color in the Flower Garden (p. 211)
  • Chapter 13 Contemporary Gardens (p. 229)
  • Chapter 14 Design Inspiration (p. 245)
  • Houses and Gardens to Visit (p. 275)
  • Notes (p. 279)
  • Bibliography (p. 286)
  • Acknowledgments (p. 290)
  • Photo and Illustration Credits (p. 291)
  • Index (p. 292)

Excerpt provided by Syndetics

Introduction In the 1870s, England began to emerge from the heavy shroud of Victorian design sensibilities by embracing a new aesthetic that would have ramifications on the design of houses, interiors, and decorative arts until the First World War. The Aesthetic Movement, which centered on the world of James McNeill Whistler and Oscar Wilde, ushered in a new concept in domestic architecture and interior design known as the "The House Beautiful."1 The concept of artistic houses characterized by the lightness of their interiors and decorated with beautiful objects was a welcome relief from the heavy furnishings, dark interiors, and somber palette of the Victorian era. This new aesthetic was especially appealing to the growing middle classes with newfound artistic yearnings. The parallel Queen Anne Movement, with its distinctive style of architecture that harked back to an earlier period in English history, took hold in London's newly fashionable enclaves, such as Chelsea and Bedford Park. The leading architect was Richard Norman Shaw (1831-1912), who, along with Ernest J. May, designed the artists' suburb in Bedford Park. There, red-brick houses featured picturesque turrets and gables, with artistic interiors in soft, pleasing colors. The Queen Anne style was personified in nursery books written and illustrated by Walter Crane, Randolph Caldecott, and, above all, Kate Greenaway, whose books Under the Window (1878), Mother Goose (1881), A Day in a Child's Life (1881), and Marigold Garden (1885) depict caricatures of Shaw houses. Her own brick house in Hampstead was designed by Shaw in 1885. In her books, children decked out in sunbonnets play outdoors amid green croquet lawns and gardens filled with colorful flower borders and enormous topiary shrubs and trees. The steep, red-tile roofs of houses peek over the tops of high green hedges and garden walls. Young ladies enjoy a leisurely afternoon tea on the lawn, with flower borders bursting with sunflowers and roses and the Shaw-inspired house on the other side of the wall. The Queen Anne style, for all its quaintness, was more suited to townhouses, shops, and suburban neighborhoods than to country houses, for which something more traditionally English was called for.2 It was during this period that former country seats were replaced by smaller houses inspired by old English models of many forms. According to Ernest Newton (1856-1922), one of Shaw's pupils, these pioneer architects "aimed at catching the spirit of the old building rather than at the literal reproduction of any defined style."3 Newton's genteel houses, such as Fouracre, in Winchfield, Hampshire, of 1901, definitely catch this spirit. The red-brick house, with decorative bands of trim and the front door opening out onto the garden, is simple, genial, and welcoming. As with many of the architects of the era, Newton's career advanced from Queen Anne and Tudor to Georgian revivals. Shaw was a versatile architect best known for his old English style. His country houses, such as Cragside in Northumberland, are generously sized and include half-timbering and other traditional details. Perched on a steep ledge, Cragside is surrounded by acres of naturalistic woodland gardens (primarily rhododendrons, heathers, and alpines) and numerous water features. In addition to Shaw, the leading practitioners of the new architecture were George Devey and Philip Webb. Devey (1820-86), a superb watercolor artist known for his picturesque approach to design, was one of the first Victorian architects to create houses based on the local vernacular, an important issue for Arts and Crafts architects. Devey's sympathetic restorations of older buildings were drawn from an extensive knowledge of Elizabethan and Jacobean architecture. Philip Speakman Webb (1831-1915) undoubtedly had the most far-reaching influence of the trio. His houses evoke the old in detailing but are innovative in planning, reflecting his passion for traditional building and local materials without copying them in a historicist fashion. A master of understatement, Webb profoundly influenced the coming generation of architects. Standen, which he designed in 1891 for London solicitor James Beale, is his masterpiece. The brick-and-stone house, with its distinctive wooden gables and tile-hung façade, takes its cue from the old farm buildings on the site that other architects might have torn down. Webb's unusual sensitivity to vernacular buildings and details had an enormous influence on the design of country houses in England. Excerpted from Gardens of the Arts and Crafts Movement by Judith B. Tankard All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This revised edition of Gardens of the Arts & Crafts Movement (1st ed., CH, Mar'05, 42-3834) adds some 80 pages, including two additional chapters ("Contemporary Gardens" and "Design Inspiration"), an expanded bibliography, and a guide of sites to visit. Most of the nearly 300 illustrations mirror the first edition's, but the book design and layout reflects more elegantly the Arts and Crafts focus. More architectural than horticultural, Arts and Crafts gardens were designed in tandem with the houses they surrounded, reflecting an aesthetic that rejected decorative Victorian design and favored vernacular styles with use of local materials. The illustrations, including contemporary photographs, period watercolors, and some site plans, support a comprehensive study of the major architects and landscape practitioners who participated in the movement, as well as their most significant works. This is a go-to, scholarly work that reflects thorough knowledge of the sites, structures, and literature on the topic. The two added chapters underline the influence that Arts and Crafts gardens continue to have on contemporary gardens, illustrating both specific recent designs and details such as architectural details, flower borders, and furnishings. A must for comprehensive landscape collections, and a recommended substitute to the earlier edition for general collections. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All readers. --Micheline Nilsen, Indiana University South Bend